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Wilson's Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
intention to have surprised and attacked them at daybreak, and had it not been for the unfortunate occurrence of the night — the neglect of the column to move forward as ordered — I have little doubt I should have succeeded in destroying or capturing the entire rebel force. Too much praise cannot be awarded to the gallant Second, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Bassett, which took a prominent part in the affair of the morning. Truly have they added new lustre to their laurels won at Wilson's Creek. With less than six hundred men, our numbers, and with guns' without bayonets, charged the enemy's line and artillery, and drove them from the field. To mention names where all, both officers and men, did their duty so well and so nobly, may seem, I fear, invidious. Yet I feel that I ought to say to Captain Crawford, who commanded the battalion that made the charge upon and captured the rebel battery, great credit is due for his gallantry; and the names of Capts. Ayres, Russell, Hop
Edwards (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
al the enemy's position. He informed us that he was about two miles distant encamped. Without waiting for reenforcements to come up, the General ordered us — the Kansas Second mounted riflemen--into line, and we marched forward toward the enemy. We could see parties of them on the prairie, and as we advanced they retired. Presently we came to a corn-field and wood, where we dismounted, passed rapidly through the field and wood, coming out into the prairie beyond. Company B, mostly from Edwards, Wabash and Wayne Counties, Illinois, with one or two other companies, were on the left of the column, and reached the prairie last. On arriving thither, they heard the companies that were on the right engaging the enemy, about a half-mile distant. Our horses had been brought around the wood. We mounted and were soon on the field of battle. We dismounted, hurried forward, loading and firing, rapidly advancing upon the enemy, who were posted in a field grown up in small sassafras bushes,
were on the right engaging the enemy, about a half-mile distant. Our horses had been brought around the wood. We mounted and were soon on the field of battle. We dismounted, hurried forward, loading and firing, rapidly advancing upon the enemy, who were posted in a field grown up in small sassafras bushes, and were firing musketry and cannon at us with at least a determination to slay. They were three thousand in number, with one large brass mounted howitzer and three large brass pieces, European make. We were not six hundred strong, with two small mounted howitzers; but forward was the command, and the command was quickly obeyed, the men making the air resound with their shouts. I have heard Indians yell, but they could not come up with our boys. At double-quick we advanced, waiting only to load; our muskets we depended upon, our pistols at our sides remaining untouched, and having no sabres and no bayonets. A strange charge! It was an exciting time. The air was musical with
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ent straight up to the muzzles of the enemy's guns, driving his cannoneers from them, seizing the four brass pieces and bringing them in triumph from the ground. It was a most brilliant and daring act, of which the gallant victors, nay, all of Kansas may well be proud. Before us and close at hand, lay the forces of the enemy, probably not less than seven thousand strong, concealed mostly by the woods. The head of our own anxiously looked for column, the Eleventh Kansas, Sixth Kansas, Rabb's and the Kansas batteries, etc., were still back three miles or more toward Maysville, while the rear of the column, Weer's regiment and others, were still further back, perhaps eight or ten miles off. New orders were sent for the advance to come up rapidly, which it did accordingly — had been doing, in fact, all the time since the dawn of day. The Sixth, headed by its gallant Colonel, Judson, came galloping over the four miles of prairie between Maysville and the point where the fight was going
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
egiment. The Kansas Second formed then on foot, and I ordered them to advance through the fence to within short-range of the enemy's position, which order was obeyed with alacrity, they opening upon the rebel lines a terrific fire with their Harper's Ferry rifles. The enemy observing our small force upon the field, the main column not having yet come in sight, attempted to overwhelm us by superior numbers, and, by flank movements, to obtain possession of the projecting woods on my right and leact as infantry, Gen. Blunt directing the movement in person, and encouraged the men, promptly and efficiently seconded by Col. Bassett and all his officers. The regiment had with it two little mountain howitzers, and the men were armed with Harper's Ferry rifles without bayonets. Emboldened by the very small number of our people present, the enemy brought out his artillery clear of the woods, and commenced blazing away at them industriously, but a very few hundred yards intervening between the
Fort Gibson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
fect. Col. Judson, of the Sixth Kansas, and Colonel Phillips, of the Third Cherokee regiment, pursued them in their retreat for a distance of seven miles, skirmishing with their rear, and leaving quite a number of their dead strewn by the way, when their horses becoming exhausted from the long and wearisome march of the night before, they were obliged to give up further pursuit. The rebels, as I have since learned, did not halt in their retreat until they had reached Arkansas River at Fort Gibson, seventy miles from the battle-ground, where they arrived thirty hours after their rout at Old Fort Wayne. The casualties in my command were one killed on the battle-field belonging to the Kansas Second, and nine wounded, and four mortally, since dead, three belonging to the Kansas Second, and one to the Kansas Sixth. Of the enemy's killed and wounded I have been unable to procure a full and accurate statement. About fifty of their dead have been found upon the field and buried by
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
with excellent effect. Col. Judson, of the Sixth Kansas, and Colonel Phillips, of the Third Cherokee regiment, pursued them in their retreat for a distance of seven miles, skirmishing with their rear, and leaving quite a number of their dead strewn by the way, when their horses becoming exhausted from the long and wearisome march of the night before, they were obliged to give up further pursuit. The rebels, as I have since learned, did not halt in their retreat until they had reached Arkansas River at Fort Gibson, seventy miles from the battle-ground, where they arrived thirty hours after their rout at Old Fort Wayne. The casualties in my command were one killed on the battle-field belonging to the Kansas Second, and nine wounded, and four mortally, since dead, three belonging to the Kansas Second, and one to the Kansas Sixth. Of the enemy's killed and wounded I have been unable to procure a full and accurate statement. About fifty of their dead have been found upon the fiel
Fort Wayne (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Doc. 12.-battle of old Fort Wayne, Ark. General Blunt's official report. headquarters First division, army of the frontier, old Fort Wayne, near Maysville, Ark., Oct. 28, 1862. Brigadier-GeFort Wayne, near Maysville, Ark., Oct. 28, 1862. Brigadier-General J. M. Schofield, Commanding Army of the Frontier: General: I have the honor to report that, in pursuance of your instructions of the twentieth instant, I left camp at Pea Ridge at about seven seventy miles from the battle-ground, where they arrived thirty hours after their rout at Old Fort Wayne. The casualties in my command were one killed on the battle-field belonging to the Kansas S abandoned. It may be found laid down on some of the maps — is so on one now before me as Old Fort Wayne, at the junction of Spannivaw and Welster creeks. Coming up with the enemy, Gen. Blunt had ty-second of October is one long to be remembered by the few who were engaged in the battle of Fort Wayne, near our present encampment. We had travelled two whole nights without sleep, and early on t
Cherokee, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ort. headquarters First division, army of the frontier, old Fort Wayne, near Maysville, Ark., Oct. 28, 1862. Brigadier-General J. M. Schofield, Commanding Army of the Frontier: General: I have the honor to report that, in pursuance of your instructions of the twentieth instant, I left camp at Pea Ridge at about seven o'clock P. M. of that day with the Second and Third brigades of my command, consisting of the Second, Sixth, and Tenth, and the Eleventh Kansas, and the First and Third Cherokee regiments, the First Kansas and the Second Indiana batteries and four mountain howitzers, leaving the First brigade, Gen. Salomon, to protect my rear and flank, and my supply train, meeting the command of Gen. Herron about midnight, which caused considerable delay. I did not reach Bentonville until daylight of the twenty-first. At the latter place I halted until five o'clock P. M. at which hour my train, left behind at Pea Ridge, came up. having learned from my scouts, sent out during t
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
our pieces of cannon, and drove him from the field. My last, under date of the twentieth inst., written on the battle-field of Pea Ridge, indicated that we were to march that night, the whole army, as I then supposed, under the command of Gen. Schofield, directly south on the Fayetteville road, in pursuit of the enemy. Information, however, coming to hand that they had divided their forces, Marmaduke, Rains, and others, with one portion of it, to proceed south-east, in the direction of Huntsville, and Cooper and Standwaite with the other west, through Bentonville to Maysville, into the Indian country; our forces were therefore divided to meet the emergency. Gens. Schofield and Totten, with the Missouri division, went in pursuit of Marmaduke and company, while Gen. Blunt, with the brigades of Weer and Cloud, followed Cooper and Standwaite, leaving Gen. Salomon, with his command, including Stockton's and Blair's batteries, at Pea Ridge, to keep open communication with the rear, pr
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