hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 702 0 Browse Search
Doc 416 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) 318 4 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 263 15 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 238 14 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 229 7 Browse Search
James G. Blunt 163 1 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Robert L. McCook 149 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 149 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 171 total hits in 57 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
He had left the gunboat Marblehead, Captain Robert Scott, there, to blockade this outlet from Savannah. We reached the bar off Ossabaw Sound at sunset on Monday evening, and selecting a good anchtion of this powerful fleet in Ossabaw Sound, had sent large reenforcements down the river from Savannah, and the smoke of steamers in the distance, moving to and from the city, indicated the most actmost deafening to a novice in such matters, and must have been heard with great distinctness in Savannah, the wind bearing the sound off in that direction. It was a most beantiful day, the sun shinins, the work would have been an easy one of accomplishment, and they might have moved on against Savannah, if so desired. These obstructions, however, have proved a greater barrier than the guns of ths of but little real importance. Yours, etc., C. C. F. Savannah Republican account. Savannah, March 12, 1863. This remarkable engagement is deserving a more extended notice than it has
Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
s the bombardment of Fort McAllister. Baltimore American account. steamship Ericsson, Ossabaw Sound, mouth of Ogeechee River, March 4, 1863. we left Port Royal harbor again at noon on Monday, the second inst., in our splendid floating homecer of the whole fleet in Ossabaw Sound, preparatory to a joint attack on Fort McAllister, located a few miles up the Ogeechee River. He had left the gunboat Marblehead, Captain Robert Scott, there, to blockade this outlet from Savannah. We reachifully, and a steamer sent out by Commandant Drayton afforded us the desired opportunity of entering the mouth of the Ogeechee River. On rounding Ossabaw Island this morning we found the entire Monitor fleet, including the Passaic, which had come th attempt of the enemy to carry the position. We would state that Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies the farthest points, by mainland, jutting out into the marsh. The river flows straight from a point about
Warsaw Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
g the coast immensely, the atmosphere being as warm as would be experienced in a sail on the Chesapeake in the month of June. On our way down we passed in view of the Light-House and entrance to Fort Pulaski, and afterward passed the mouth of Warsaw Sound, and learned that Commandant Drayton had left his anchorage there with the Monitor Passaic, and had joined and taken command as senior officer of the whole fleet in Ossabaw Sound, preparatory to a joint attack on Fort McAllister, located a feweamer sent out by Commandant Drayton afforded us the desired opportunity of entering the mouth of the Ogeechee River. On rounding Ossabaw Island this morning we found the entire Monitor fleet, including the Passaic, which had come down from Warsaw Sound with the three mortar-schooners, had gone up to Fort McAllister, and the fight was momentarily expected to commence. The entire fleet about to engage the rebels consisted of the following vessels: The Passaic, (monitor,) Commander Percival
Nahant (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
corresponding depression to us. The possession of the Fort was but of little importance, but the failure to take it after so vigorous an attempt was somewhat mortifying. The iron-clad monitors this morning, (Wednesday), after the grand rebel feu-de-joie at day-break, break, all fell back to their former anchorage, and made preparations, with the mortar-boats, for an immediate return to Port Royal. The Montauk, accompanied by the gunboat Wissahickon, started immediately, and the Passaic, Nahant, and Patapsco were in readiness to depart the same evening, but the weather becoming rough, they postponed their departure until Thursday morning. The result of the fight was deemed as settling the question that with such shallow water and the narrowness of the stream, the taking of an earthwork situated as Fort McAllister was an impossibility. Unless the obstructions in the river were previously removed, or the aid of a land force was given to the monitors, they could not approach withi
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
point, Ga. this action is also known as the bombardment of Fort McAllister. Baltimore American account. steamship Ericsson, Ossabwhole fleet in Ossabaw Sound, preparatory to a joint attack on Fort McAllister, located a few miles up the Ogeechee River. He had left the gm Warsaw Sound with the three mortar-schooners, had gone up to Fort McAllister, and the fight was momentarily expected to commence. The entirrowness of the stream, the taking of an earthwork situated as Fort McAllister was an impossibility. Unless the obstructions in the river wetempt of the enemy to carry the position. We would state that Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies thay, like so many fiery demons, plunging into the earthworks of Fort McAllister to the depth of eight or ten feet, or exploding with a voice oing to invent new plans to overawe and subdue the South. Of Fort McAllister itself, and its builders, we should say a word before closing.
Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
lister. Baltimore American account. steamship Ericsson, Ossabaw Sound, mouth of Ogeechee River, March 4, 1863. we left Port Royal Georgia, with instructions to report to Commandant Drayton, in Ossabaw Sound. Previous to leaving Port Royal, the whole fleet of iron-cladsgo, and had Admiral Du Pont consulted us as to our destination, Ossabaw Sound would have been the unanimous choice of Capt. Lowber and his lioined and taken command as senior officer of the whole fleet in Ossabaw Sound, preparatory to a joint attack on Fort McAllister, located a feo blockade this outlet from Savannah. We reached the bar off Ossabaw Sound at sunset on Monday evening, and selecting a good anchorage aboeived intimation of the concentration of this powerful fleet in Ossabaw Sound, had sent large reenforcements down the river from Savannah, anuns almost south, and behind a point of woods; thence onward to Ossabaw Sound and the ocean. During the afternoon of Monday, three iron moni
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
Doc. 129.-battle of Genesis point, Ga. this action is also known as the bombardment of Fort McAllister. Baltimore American account. steamship Ericsson, Ossabaw Sound, mouth of Ogeechee River, March 4, 1863. we left Port Royal harbor again at noon on Monday, the second inst., in our splendid floating home, the steamship Ericsson, Captain Lowber, bound for the coast of Georgia, with instructions to report to Commandant Drayton, in Ossabaw Sound. Previous to leaving Port Royal, the whole fleet of iron-clads were in motion for the same destination. It was therefore just the place to which we were anxious to go, and had Admiral Du Pont consulteof telegraphic reports, embracing only its results, is not just to the noble and heroic spirits who, on that memorable occasion, defended successfully the soil of Georgia against an armament which in force and terror is without a parallel. The Brigadier-General commanding the department, has in part supplied the omission of his co
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
he steamship Ericsson, Captain Lowber, bound for the coast of Georgia, with instructions to report to Commandant Drayton, in Ossabaw Sound. Previous to leaving Port Royal, the whole fleet of iron-clads were in motion for the same destination. It was therefore just the place to which we were anxious to go, and had Admiral Du Pontt damage. She continued in her position, tiring on the Nashville until she was blown up, and then fell back to her anchorage. On Wednesday she steamed back to Port Royal, and is ready for the next movement that may be ordered. She did not take part in the fight, because only three vessels could get in position, and it was desire grand rebel feu-de-joie at day-break, break, all fell back to their former anchorage, and made preparations, with the mortar-boats, for an immediate return to Port Royal. The Montauk, accompanied by the gunboat Wissahickon, started immediately, and the Passaic, Nahant, and Patapsco were in readiness to depart the same evening,
Ossabaw Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 139
There was scarcely a ripple on the ocean, and we enjoyed our game of whist as quietly as if at home, expecting to be aroused early in the morning by the roar of artillery on shore. The night was one of unusual quiet, and we listened in vain in the morning for any indications of the anticipated conflict. The sun had risen brightly and beautifully, and a steamer sent out by Commandant Drayton afforded us the desired opportunity of entering the mouth of the Ogeechee River. On rounding Ossabaw Island this morning we found the entire Monitor fleet, including the Passaic, which had come down from Warsaw Sound with the three mortar-schooners, had gone up to Fort McAllister, and the fight was momentarily expected to commence. The entire fleet about to engage the rebels consisted of the following vessels: The Passaic, (monitor,) Commander Percival Drayton, senior officer in command, carrying one fifteen-inch and one eleven-inch Dahlgren. The Patapsco, (monitor,) Commander Daniel Am
Doc. 129.-battle of Genesis point, Ga. this action is also known as the bombardment of Fort McAllister. Baltimore American account. steamship Ericsson, Ossabaw Sound, mouth of Ogeechee River, March 4, 1863. we left Port Royal harbor again at noon on Monday, the second inst., in our splendid floating home, the steamship Ericsson, Captain Lowber, bound for the coast of Georgia, with instructions to report to Commandant Drayton, in Ossabaw Sound. Previous to leaving Port Royal, the whole fleet of iron-clads were in motion for the same destination. It was therefore just the place to which we were anxious to go, and had Admiral Du Pont consulted us as to our destination, Ossabaw Sound would have been the unanimous choice of Capt. Lowber and his little family party. It was a bright and beautiful day, and we enjoyed the trip along the coast immensely, the atmosphere being as warm as would be experienced in a sail on the Chesapeake in the month of June. On our way down
1 2 3 4 5 6