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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 148
Doc. 138.-the fight at Port Hudson. New-York world account. United States sloop-of-war Richmond, off Prophet Island, Mississippi River, March 15, 1863. we soon passed the head of Prophet Island, and arrived abreast of the mortar-boats, which were headed by the Essex and the Sachem. Presently their gleaming lights, which had been on our starboard beam, shone on our quarter, and anon they were sparkling astern. And now we were nearing the point of danger. Signal-lights were seen s an admirable one, and succeeded to a charm. But for it, perhaps all the vessels that it was intended should pass the batteries would have got by, and the good old Mississippi would have existed many years more as the pride and glory of the United States steam-navy. We had left the mortar-boats well astern, when a sulphurous light was seen gleaming on the shore, on our port-side. Flashing up for a moment, a dull explosion followed. It was evidently an imperfect rocket. Another was essay
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at the passage of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, below New-Orleans, and had participated in the fights of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Island Number10, Vicksburgh, etc., as the severest in the naval history of the present war. Shortly after this close engagement we seemed to have passed the worst. The enemyown. On being carried below he used the following patriotic words, which are worthy of becoming historical: I would willingly give my other leg so that we could but pass the batteries. The Rev. Dr. Bacon, the loyal rector of Christ Church, New-Orleans, who was acting as chaplain on board the Richmond, was on the bridge when Mr. Cummings received his terrible wound. He fortunately escaped unhurt, though he had been all over the ship, in the thickest of the fight, carrying messages and exhor
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
s turn was exposed to the same fiery ordeal on nearing the centre battery, and right promptly did their gallant tars return the compliment. This was the hottest part of the engagement. We were literally muzzle to muzzle, the distance between us and the enemy's guns being not more than twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at the passage of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, below New-Orleans, and had participated in the fights of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Island Number10, Vicksburgh, etc., as the severest in the naval history of the present war. Shortly after this close engagement we seemed to have passed the worst. The enemy's shot and shell no longer swept our decks like a hail-storm; but the fire from the batteries was kept up in a desultory manner. The starboard bow-gun could no longer be brought to bear. Consequently Lieut. Te
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
liment. This was the hottest part of the engagement. We were literally muzzle to muzzle, the distance between us and the enemy's guns being not more than twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at the passage of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, below New-Orleans, and had participated in the fights of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Island Number10, Vicksburgh, etc., as the severest in the naval history of the present war. Shortly after this close engagement we seemed to have passed the worst. The enemy's shot and shell no longer swept our decks like a hail-storm; but the fire from the batteries was kept up in a desultory manner. The starboard bow-gun could no longer be brought to bear. Consequently Lieut. Terry ordered the men on the top-gallant forecastle to leave the guns in that part of the ship, and to descend to the main deck to help
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
nd he, without doubt, sank beneath the waves of the mighty river. Just after this fearful incident firing was heard astern of us, and it was soon ascertained that the Monongahela, with her consort, the Kineo, and the Mississippi were in action. The Monongahela carries a couple of two hundred-pounder rifled Parrott guns, beside other ticklers. At first I credited the roar of her amiable two hundred-pounders to the bummers, till I was undeceived, when I recalled my experience in front of Yorktown last spring, and the opening of fire from similar guns from Wormley's Creek. All I can say is, the noise was splendid. The action now became general. The roar of cannon was incessant, and the flashes from the guns, together with the flight of the shells from the mortar-boats, made up a combination of sound and sight impossible to describe. To add to the horrors of the night, while it contributed toward the enhancement of a certain terrible beauty, dense clouds of smoke began to envelop
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
s got ready and pointed, and was about to be discharged, when Lieutenant Terry called out: Hold on; you are about to fire into the Hartford. And such was the fact; for the flash of the Hartford's guns at that moment revealed the spars and rigging of that vessel. Consequently the gun was not fired, nor was it discharged during the engagement, the fighting being confined entirely to the starboard side. But, though we did not fire into the Hartford, a story is afloat, and, as it may reach New-York and cause unnecessary comment and excitement, unless authoritatively contradicted, it seems to be my duty to kill it at once. The story goes that the Richmond fired three shots into the Mississippi, and that the shots were returned with interest — each vessel taking the other for an enemy. I say, emphatically, that the story is not true; and in this assertion I am borne out by nearly every officer of the Richmond. The Mississippi was astern of us, and if she had passed us on the way up —
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
gallant tars return the compliment. This was the hottest part of the engagement. We were literally muzzle to muzzle, the distance between us and the enemy's guns being not more than twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at the passage of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, below New-Orleans, and had participated in the fights of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Island Number10, Vicksburgh, etc., as the severest in the naval history of the present war. Shortly after this close engagement we seemed to have passed the worst. The enemy's shot and shell no longer swept our decks like a hail-storm; but the fire from the batteries was kept up in a desultory manner. The starboard bow-gun could no longer be brought to bear. Consequently Lieut. Terry ordered the men on the top-gallant forecastle to leave the guns in that part of the ship, and to des
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
to the same fiery ordeal on nearing the centre battery, and right promptly did their gallant tars return the compliment. This was the hottest part of the engagement. We were literally muzzle to muzzle, the distance between us and the enemy's guns being not more than twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at the passage of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, below New-Orleans, and had participated in the fights of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Island Number10, Vicksburgh, etc., as the severest in the naval history of the present war. Shortly after this close engagement we seemed to have passed the worst. The enemy's shot and shell no longer swept our decks like a hail-storm; but the fire from the batteries was kept up in a desultory manner. The starboard bow-gun could no longer be brought to bear. Consequently Lieut. Terry ordered the men
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
eturn the compliment. This was the hottest part of the engagement. We were literally muzzle to muzzle, the distance between us and the enemy's guns being not more than twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at the passage of Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson, below New-Orleans, and had participated in the fights of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Island Number10, Vicksburgh, etc., as the severest in the naval history of the present war. Shortly after this close engagement we seemed to have passed the worst. The enemy's shot and shell no longer swept our decks like a hail-storm; but the fire from the batteries was kept up in a desultory manner. The starboard bow-gun could no longer be brought to bear. Consequently Lieut. Terry ordered the men on the top-gallant forecastle to leave the guns in that part of the ship, and to descend to the ma
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 148
Doc. 138.-the fight at Port Hudson. New-York world account. United States sloop-of-war Richmond, off Prophet Island, Mississippi River, March 15, 1863. we soon passed the head of Prophere than twenty yards, though to me it seemed to be only as many feet. In fact, the battle of Port Hudson has been pronounced by officers and seamen who were engaged in it, and who were present at thands on board, including the wounded men, were put on shore on the bank of the river opposite Port Hudson. This was accompanied by a deafening yell of exultation from the rebels on perceiving the blof the Appeal, writing on the fifteenth, furnishes the subjoined details of the engagement at Port Hudson, between the batteries and Admiral Farragut's fleet. Yesterday, (Sunday, fourteenth,) a nud in the list of casualties. . . . . . Such are the particulars of this morning's fight at Port Hudson. For the time it lasted it was one of the most desperately contested engagements of the war.
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