hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 702 0 Browse Search
Doc 416 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) 318 4 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 263 15 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 238 14 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 229 7 Browse Search
James G. Blunt 163 1 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Robert L. McCook 149 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 149 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 210 total hits in 75 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
e very same point last summer, while a force of Union troops was advancing, the enemy brought down a piece of artillery on a car, and caused their precipitate retreat with great loss. Our men on this occasion tore up the track for some distance, in order to prevent a similar occurrence. Meantime the firing waxed pretty hot, and the enemy, doubtless seeking to gain time, sent out a flag of truce, which invited Col. Smith to a conference with the rebel commander, Lieut.-Colonel Miller, of Mississippi. A parley ensued, and an interchange of communications between the two commanders with regard to the cotton captured on the schooners--Col. Miller declaring that it was the property of British subjects. This ended, hostilities were resumed, and Colonel Smith soon after hearing the signal of Col. Clark, advanced with his regiment against the rebel position. The secessionists waited only long enough to exchange a few shots, and then took refuge in the woods. The Zouaves clambered over t
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
which it is pleasanter to recur to than it was to realize. The following are the names of the wounded Zouaves: Elias Tucker, James Brady, Joseph Reilly. As before stated, none of them were much hurt. The long nights of the bivouac in a Louisiana swamp; the alligators that were killed; the poisonous snakes that came out of the water to visit us; the mosquitoes that worried us; the screech owls that made night hideous; all these are perhaps better imagined than described. Campaigning in Louisiana in all these little respects is very much more disagreeable than it is in Virginia. Appended are the official reports of the expedition: Colonel Clark's report. Manchac Pass, La., March 29, 1863. Captain----: sir: In compliance with orders of date March twentieth, 1863, I proceeded with my command to Frenier Station, on the morning of the twenty-first, and there bivouacked for the night, assuming command at post. I found four companies, General Nickerson's brigade, at Frenier a
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 154
Wm. J. Walker. There has been one death by disease, and three men have been accidentally killed since the regiment left New-York, on the eighteenth of December last. Private Spicer J. Ruderow, of company A, died, in January, of typhoid fever. Corporal David Brown, of company D, was shot during the same month, while on guard, by the accidental falling of a stack of muskets. Private Geo. Hoctor, and Corporal Andrew Jackson, both of company E, were killed last week. The first, while on guard, was accidentally shot by the corporal of the guard; the last was killed by a piece of shell, fired from the United States gunboat Portsmouth, which, by some strange carelessness, burst over the camp of the Zouaves. They were all estimable men, and their early death is deeply regretted. It has been proposed by General Banks to convert the battalion into a regiment of mounted Zouaves. The matter is under consideration. It would make a magnificent and dashing cavalry corps. Epistolographos.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
third I debarked the One Hundred and Sixty-fifth New-York volunteers, placed one field-piece on the north side of the island, where the railroad bridge crosses the North Pass, and embarked the troops brought by me from Frenier, consisting of the Sixth regiment Michigan volunteers, two small companies One Hundred and Twenty-seventh ar, and believing the village of Ponchatoula could not be held against forces greater than my own, I ordered the schooners and gunboat in Ponchatoula Creek, to the North Pass, and fell back, on the afternoon of the twenty-fifth, to a point three miles south of Ponchatoula, on the railroad, with the main body of my command, leaving, on the morning of the twenty-third, at about half-past 8 A. M., and took up the march about half-past 10 A. M., along the railroad, across Jones's Island, to the North Pass, which I crossed immediately, and halted on the north side in obedience to orders, sending out an advanced-guard. They discovered a rebel picket about one mi
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
on against the rebels at Ponchatoula. This regiment, since its arrival at New-Orleans early in January, has been encamped five miles from that city, within an exthas made it one of the most efficient corps in the service. The defences of New-Orleans having been placed under the charge of General Sherman, this regiment was ad in the little fight whose details I am about to give you. The defence of New-Orleans required, in the judgment of General Sherman, the construction of a work at h another vessel, both laden with cotton, was afterward captured and sent to New-Orleans. That night the men bivouacked on the track, cold, wet, and hungry, and disotton. We have captured some twelve prisoners, which have been sent on to New-Orleans. Owing to the very bad weather, the march over the trestle-work from Kennerel Commanding Expedition. To Capt. W. Hoffman, Assistant Adjutant-General, New-Orleans, La. Colonel Smith's report. headquarters one hundred and Sixty-Fifth
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
e soldier, gradually begot in the Zouaves an esprit du corps which has evinced itself vividly in the little fight whose details I am about to give you. The defence of New-Orleans required, in the judgment of General Sherman, the construction of a work at Manchac Pass which might prevent any approach of the enemy on the line of the New-Orleans and Jackson Railroad. Some effort on the part of the rebels to repossess the city in the absence of General Banks with the bulk of the forces at Baton Rouge and Port Hudson, was anticipated. In order that a fortification might be thrown up at this point without interruption, it became necessary to interpose a force between it and the enemy. Accordingly, Colonel Thomas S. Clark, of the Sixth regiment Michigan volunteers, was placed in command of a force consisting of his own regiment, the Zouaves, and detachments of the Ninth regiment Connecticut volunteers, the One Hundred and Seventy-seventh New-York volunteers, Fourteenth and Twenty-fourt
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
ally begot in the Zouaves an esprit du corps which has evinced itself vividly in the little fight whose details I am about to give you. The defence of New-Orleans required, in the judgment of General Sherman, the construction of a work at Manchac Pass which might prevent any approach of the enemy on the line of the New-Orleans and Jackson Railroad. Some effort on the part of the rebels to repossess the city in the absence of General Banks with the bulk of the forces at Baton Rouge and Port Hudson, was anticipated. In order that a fortification might be thrown up at this point without interruption, it became necessary to interpose a force between it and the enemy. Accordingly, Colonel Thomas S. Clark, of the Sixth regiment Michigan volunteers, was placed in command of a force consisting of his own regiment, the Zouaves, and detachments of the Ninth regiment Connecticut volunteers, the One Hundred and Seventy-seventh New-York volunteers, Fourteenth and Twenty-fourth regiments Main
Ponchatoula Creek (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
osition, and hold the pass until he heard the signal of attack from me at Wadesboro Landing, when he was to advance, and form a junction with me at Ponchatoula. I then proceeded, with the main body of the troops, up the Tickafaw River, and Ponchatoula Creek, to Wadesboro Landing, three miles from Ponchatoula. Owing to the great difficulty of navigation in the creek, from its extremely tortuous course, we did not arrive at Wadesboro until about noon of the twenty-fourth. I immediately debarkege, and also a smaller one a mile this side. Having accomplished the object of the expedition thus far, and believing the village of Ponchatoula could not be held against forces greater than my own, I ordered the schooners and gunboat in Ponchatoula Creek, to the North Pass, and fell back, on the afternoon of the twenty-fifth, to a point three miles south of Ponchatoula, on the railroad, with the main body of my command, leaving six companies at Ponchatoula, under Major Clarke, Sixth regime
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
A National account. on board U. S. Steam transport General Banks, Lake Ponchartrain, La., Saturday April 4, 1863. The steamer from whose deck I write you is lying aground off Manchac Pass, with the One Hundred and Sixty-fifth regiment New-York volunteers (Second Duryea Zouaves) aboard, just returning from a successful expedition against the rebels at Ponchatoula. This regiment, since its arrival at New-Orleans early in January, has been encamped five miles from that city, within annd Lieutenant, E. Bayard Webster. Company F.--Captain, Gould H. Thorpe; First Lieutenant, James B. Vose; Second Lieutenant, Wm. J. Walker. There has been one death by disease, and three men have been accidentally killed since the regiment left New-York, on the eighteenth of December last. Private Spicer J. Ruderow, of company A, died, in January, of typhoid fever. Corporal David Brown, of company D, was shot during the same month, while on guard, by the accidental falling of a stack of muske
Wadesboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
oceed up the railroad, to within three miles of Ponchatoula, take position, and hold the pass until he heard the signal of attack from me at Wadesboro Landing, when he was to advance, and form a junction with me at Ponchatoula. I then proceeded, with the main body of the troops, up the Tickafaw River, and Ponchatoula Creek, to Wadesboro Landing, three miles from Ponchatoula. Owing to the great difficulty of navigation in the creek, from its extremely tortuous course, we did not arrive at Wadesboro until about noon of the twenty-fourth. I immediately debarked the troops, threw out skirmishers, and advanced toward Ponchatoula. About a half-mile from the landing, we found the enemy's skirmishers in strong force; and believing, from the number of skirmishers, that the enemy were in stronger force than we had supposed, immediately formed line of battle, and advanced three companies ahead skirmishing. We drove them steadily before us, the main body never coming within range of their fi
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...