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Chowan River (United States) (search for this): chapter 155
ilitary exploits. A little more than a year ago you came to defend and protect North-Carolina. You had possession of Roanoke Island, Fort Macon, New-bern, Washington, and Hatteras. How are they now? In the Falstaff imagination of your secession friends, every soldier under General Foster was transformed into live; the sea-coast is abandoned, and you are eating out the substance of my people in the interior. Come, look at the counties of Currituck, Cam. den, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Chowan, Washington, Tyrrell, and Hyde. Think of this immense and rich territory — of their bright fields; how their valleys laughed with corn and wheat before your arrival; and now behold them, under the advice and rule of your demon associates, almost covered with blood and ashes. Pardon me for giving you a word of advice — the last from me, as I leave immediately for my distant home. You have committed a great crime in your part in this horrid war. You commenced with perjury, and are trying
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
the ridiculous enmity of such creatures as D. H. Hill. You are supposed, General, to command the Department of Pamlico, or the whole of Eastern North-Carolina. Can you not condescend to pay me a visit? Come and see what inestimable blessings your peaceful secession has conferred on the peace-loving people of North-Carolina. Come! behold the scenes of your great military exploits. A little more than a year ago you came to defend and protect North-Carolina. You had possession of Roanoke Island, Fort Macon, New-bern, Washington, and Hatteras. How are they now? In the Falstaff imagination of your secession friends, every soldier under General Foster was transformed into live; the sea-coast is abandoned, and you are eating out the substance of my people in the interior. Come, look at the counties of Currituck, Cam. den, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Chowan, Washington, Tyrrell, and Hyde. Think of this immense and rich territory — of their bright fields; how their valleys laughe
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
xcellency is well aware that the path of this murderer and freebooter has ever been marked by the glare of burning churches, school-houses, private residences, barns, stables, fences, etc., etc. Your Excellency may have some influence with these brigands, and a gentle hint to them that this may not be the best way of restoring the Union would doubtless meet with their respectful attention. North-Carolina is peculiarly happy to have two Governors in this sad crisis. Her civil Governor at Raleigh has often bared his bosom on the deadly bullet in defence of his native State. Her military Governor has not thought it prudent to expose his gubernatorial person in battle. It is to be hoped, however, that when he has organized his negro brigade, his Excellency the military Governor will (having laid in an abundant supply of ottar of roses and eau de cologne) put himself at its head, and strike for his own, his native land. The parallel between Governors suggests another between gener
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
Doc. 145.-official correspondence between Governor Stanly and General Hill. Major-General Hill to Governor Stanly. Goldsboro, N. C., March 24, 1863. His Excellency E. Stanly, Military Governor of North-Carolina: sir: A letter from you to Major-General French has been referred to me as his successor. It was with deep mortification and pain I perceived that a son of the proud and honored house of Stanly should so far forget his noble lineage as to descend to low abuse of his own peoon due to your exalted position, I subscribe myself your obedient servant, D. H. Hill., Major-General Confederate States Army. Governor Stanly to Major-General Hill. Newbern, N. C., March 27, 1863. To Major-General D. H Hill, C. S.A., Goldsboro: sir: By flag of truce last night I received a communication from you of the twenty-fourth instant, full of insolent falsehood and blackguard abuse. To those who know any thing of the peculiar traits of your character, it will be amusing
Cherokee (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
the Yankee scoundrels had been at home attending to their own business, Plymouth would not have been disturbed. The burden of the sin rests, therefore, upon the brutal invaders of a peaceful and peace-loving people. May I not hope that your Excellency, the Military Governor of North-Carolina, having rebuked confederate atrocities, will devote a portion of your valuable time to the excesses of the infernal Yankees? In the gubernatorial peregrinations of your Excellency from Currituck to Cherokee — the seaboard to the mountains — you must have been struck with the remarkable fact that there are more houses burnt in a few eastern counties than in all the rest of the great State over which your Excellency presides. It is observable that the counties so desolated are those in which the Yankee friends of your Excellency have been able to penetrate. Your Yankee master, Foster, is accustomed to make raids whenever he learns that his forces exceed the confederate five to one. Your Exc
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
d only reveals the deep malignity which you have had toward me. Though bound to my native land with hooks of steel, my adopted home is California. My loyalty to her is not impeached. My duty to her is undeniable. Her determination in the present crisis is not doubted. I hardly think even one of your mad prejudices against the infernal Yankees, in a sober moment, would condemn as a traitor him who was faithful in his allegiance to his home, whether that home was California, Louisiana, or Vermont. But the height of hypocritical audacity is reached when you, though rather tamely, endeavor to speak respectfully of the Southern General Washington. In your estimation his only title to public honor was that he was called a rebel, and that he was honored by the British, and therefore honored by D. H. Hill, Major-General, confederate States army! The monomaniac of secession, D. H. Hill, at last speaks respectfully of Washington! Therefore it became a proverb, is Saul also among the
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
to assure your Excellency that, with the distinguished consideration due to your exalted position, I subscribe myself your obedient servant, D. H. Hill., Major-General Confederate States Army. Governor Stanly to Major-General Hill. Newbern, N. C., March 27, 1863. To Major-General D. H Hill, C. S.A., Goldsboro: sir: By flag of truce last night I received a communication from you of the twenty-fourth instant, full of insolent falsehood and blackguard abuse. To those who know any tyou so unworthily endeavor to cast reproach. As far as my observation extends, I know of but two attempts in North-Carolina to destroy towns by burning — both these were made by men of your political school. I refer to the attempt to destroy Newbern and to the burning of Plymouth. You are pleased, in the mean malignity of your nature, to make a comparison of the civil and military Governors of North-Carolina, in the hope of wounding my feelings. How little you know of the feelings and c
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
on with men who would serve under such a man as D. H. Hill. Your allusion to Arnold is beneath contempt, and only reveals the deep malignity which you have had toward me. Though bound to my native land with hooks of steel, my adopted home is California. My loyalty to her is not impeached. My duty to her is undeniable. Her determination in the present crisis is not doubted. I hardly think even one of your mad prejudices against the infernal Yankees, in a sober moment, would condemn as a traitor him who was faithful in his allegiance to his home, whether that home was California, Louisiana, or Vermont. But the height of hypocritical audacity is reached when you, though rather tamely, endeavor to speak respectfully of the Southern General Washington. In your estimation his only title to public honor was that he was called a rebel, and that he was honored by the British, and therefore honored by D. H. Hill, Major-General, confederate States army! The monomaniac of secession,
Currituck (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
er, that if the Yankee scoundrels had been at home attending to their own business, Plymouth would not have been disturbed. The burden of the sin rests, therefore, upon the brutal invaders of a peaceful and peace-loving people. May I not hope that your Excellency, the Military Governor of North-Carolina, having rebuked confederate atrocities, will devote a portion of your valuable time to the excesses of the infernal Yankees? In the gubernatorial peregrinations of your Excellency from Currituck to Cherokee — the seaboard to the mountains — you must have been struck with the remarkable fact that there are more houses burnt in a few eastern counties than in all the rest of the great State over which your Excellency presides. It is observable that the counties so desolated are those in which the Yankee friends of your Excellency have been able to penetrate. Your Yankee master, Foster, is accustomed to make raids whenever he learns that his forces exceed the confederate five to o
Fort Macon (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
s enmity of such creatures as D. H. Hill. You are supposed, General, to command the Department of Pamlico, or the whole of Eastern North-Carolina. Can you not condescend to pay me a visit? Come and see what inestimable blessings your peaceful secession has conferred on the peace-loving people of North-Carolina. Come! behold the scenes of your great military exploits. A little more than a year ago you came to defend and protect North-Carolina. You had possession of Roanoke Island, Fort Macon, New-bern, Washington, and Hatteras. How are they now? In the Falstaff imagination of your secession friends, every soldier under General Foster was transformed into live; the sea-coast is abandoned, and you are eating out the substance of my people in the interior. Come, look at the counties of Currituck, Cam. den, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Chowan, Washington, Tyrrell, and Hyde. Think of this immense and rich territory — of their bright fields; how their valleys laughed with corn an
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