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Botany Bay (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 160
fleet of four iron-clad gunboats, and in tow of a steamer, namely, the United States, Locust Point, Cahawba, and the gunboat Connemaugh. In addition to these were several colliers and store vessels. Preceding this fleet in Edisto Inlet were the gunboats South-Carolina and Flambeau and three schooner mortar-boats. The consolidation of these two fleets made quite an imposing appearance, doubtless stimulating the nerves of the rebels in that vicinity, and particularly the rebel pickets on Botany Bay, Seabrook, and Edisto Islands, many of whom were in sight when the fleet entered the harbor. From the anchorage of the Expounder in Edisto Inlet, half-a-mile distant, on Bohicksett Creek, I could distinctly see the deserted but beautiful town, Rockville. Its inhabitants, being of the secession persuasion, had gone Dixieward. The town has a neat church, with an immense spire; a large cotton-ginning establishment, stores, postoffice, dwelling-houses, and the usual concomitants of a firs
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
y; the initiatory movement of movements, and the grand movement of the great expedition which is to reduce the hotbed of secession, will be prominent facts of the contemporaneous history of the present rebellion, and will hereafter occupy a prominent part in the future standard history of the United States. The defeat or success of this expedition will have a preponderating influence, one way or the other, in the closing of the present war. The One Hundredth regiment, which came from North-Carolina in February last, is a portion of the Eighteenth army corps. From their arrival in the department of the South, until they embarked for the expedition to this place, they have been encamped at St. Helena Island, Port Royal harbor. Pursuant to orders from General Hunter, they embarked from that place on Monday, the twenty-fourth instant, on board the steamer Expounder, Captain Deering. As they marched from the camp to the vessel, they were the recipients of the cheers of their comrades
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
y morning, the twenty-seventh instant, the Expounder and the Belvidere weighed anchor, took their departure from Edisto, and proceeded once more to Stono Inlet. The weather was delightful, and the heavy wind which prevailed the day previous, had subsided. Both vessels arrived at the inlet before high-water, and were obliged to lay off and on until the tide should serve. We were well repaid for the delay, as we had the gratification of seeing the iron ram Keokuk pass us, en route from Fortress Monroe for Hilton lead. This double-turreted monster looked formidable. While waiting for the tide to serve, the Government pilot on the Expounder made a small boat survey of Stono Bar. After he returned, which was about noon, the Expounder was got under weigh; but immediately after passing the first buoy, she grounded on a shoal, from which her motive power was unable to extricate her. Capt. Deering, of the Expounder, immediately ordered the ensign to be set, union down, as a signal of di
Saint Helena Island, S.C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
redth regiment, which came from North-Carolina in February last, is a portion of the Eighteenth army corps. From their arrival in the department of the South, until they embarked for the expedition to this place, they have been encamped at St. Helena Island, Port Royal harbor. Pursuant to orders from General Hunter, they embarked from that place on Monday, the twenty-fourth instant, on board the steamer Expounder, Captain Deering. As they marched from the camp to the vessel, they were the re where they disembarked, and exchanged their fire-arms for the new Austrian rifle. This work occupied nearly the entire day, and it was nearly dark before the regiment reembarked. The Expounder transport then returned to her anchorage off St. Helena Island, where she remained for the night. On Tuesday, the twenty-fifth instant, a southeast gale, accompanied by rain and fog, prevailed, so that it was injudicious to move on that day. At daylight on the morning of Wednesday, the twenty-six
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
At half-past 7 o'clock A. M. the Expounder passed the outer buoy of Port Royal harbor, was headed on a north-eastern course, (Charlestonward.) The distance from Port Royal to Coles's Island is estimated at forty-five miles. The steamer Belvidere, with stores and artillery for the expedition, followed in the rear of the Expounder. own the coast the steamships Ericsson and S. R. Spaulding, proceeding in opposite directions to us, were successively passed, the former from New-York bound for Port Royal towing a nondescript looking raft. The Spaulding had troops on board. At half-past 11 o'clock the Expounder and Belvidere arrived off Stono Inlet. From thi in the best of spirits, with their eyes wide open for an attack from the rebels. In justice to the One Hundredth regiment, I must say, from the time they left Port Royal to the time they landed on Coles's Island, not a murmur was heard from the soldiers, although during the trip they were subject to many inconveniences and hards
Stono Inlet (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
es and artillery for the expedition, followed in the rear of the Expounder. As the tide in Stono Inlet bar would not serve until noon, no attempt was made to put the Expounder at her full speed. lding had troops on board. At half-past 11 o'clock the Expounder and Belvidere arrived off Stono Inlet. From this point, looking landward, the gunboats Pawnee and Commodore McDonough, doing blocklockading fleet off Charleston were distinctly seen. The magnetic bearing of Charleston from Stono Inlet is northeast by cast, twelve miles distant. By the time our mosquito expedition reached St inlet. The Expounder had a government pilot on board who pretended to know the channel into Stono Inlet, but when his capacity was put to the test, as we approached the outer buoy, he displayed so nd the Belvidere weighed anchor, took their departure from Edisto, and proceeded once more to Stono Inlet. The weather was delightful, and the heavy wind which prevailed the day previous, had subsid
Edisto (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
there, and the town is frequently visited by rebel scouting-parties. The view of the surrounding country, from Edisto Inlet, is sublime. The soil is of unexampled natural fertility, out of which can be raised almost any kind of a crop. From Edisto, the eye can describe a semicircle of territory from twelve to fifteen miles in extent. The topography of the land is of an undulatory character. The arable cultivated lands bear such a harmonious proportion to the palmetto and pine woods, as tltivation. The landscape from Edisto Inlet, is one well worthy of the pencil and easel of the limner. At eight o'clock, on Thursday morning, the twenty-seventh instant, the Expounder and the Belvidere weighed anchor, took their departure from Edisto, and proceeded once more to Stono Inlet. The weather was delightful, and the heavy wind which prevailed the day previous, had subsided. Both vessels arrived at the inlet before high-water, and were obliged to lay off and on until the tide shoul
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
United States army)--took undisputed possession of Coles's Island, nine miles from Charleston, this morning. I write this letter from their camp. There is no secrecy attached to this movement, and the facts I shall record cannot operate prejudicially to any subsequent movements. I presume the main facts of the movement will be chronicled in the rebel newspapers, and thoroughly discussed at rebel breakfast-tables several days ere this letter reaches New-York. The discovery of America by Columbus; the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, are prominent facts of American history; the initiatory movement of movements, and the grand movement of the great expedition which is to reduce the hotbed of secession, will be prominent facts of the contemporaneous history of the present rebellion, and will hereafter occupy a prominent part in the future standard history of the United States. The defeat or success of this expedition will have a preponderating influence, one way or the other, in t
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
town, Rockville. Its inhabitants, being of the secession persuasion, had gone Dixieward. The town has a neat church, with an immense spire; a large cotton-ginning establishment, stores, postoffice, dwelling-houses, and the usual concomitants of a first-class town. Some of the dwelling-houses are neat, capacious, and apparently comfortable. The town in many respects wears the air of a Yankee town. The architecture of the buildings seems to indicate that at one time a live Yankee from Massachusetts had settled there. As I said before, the place is uninhabited, except by a few superannuated negroes, male and female. The rebels have a picket station there, and the town is frequently visited by rebel scouting-parties. The view of the surrounding country, from Edisto Inlet, is sublime. The soil is of unexampled natural fertility, out of which can be raised almost any kind of a crop. From Edisto, the eye can describe a semicircle of territory from twelve to fifteen miles in exten
Legareville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 160
the island was at one time garrisoned by the Fourteenth South-Carolina regiment. When our troops landed, they discovered water-wells were already dug for them. From the north side of Coles's Island, two miles distant, is the pretty town of Legareville. It is situated on the Stono River, and runs parallel with it. It has many large buildings of modern architecture, and appears to have been once, if not now, occupied by a pretty enterprising people. The houses are surrounded by large flower Camp-fires were extinguished, so as to obscure our exact position from the rebels. About midnight, the rebel pickets exhibited flash signal-lights, within three hundred yards of our picket-line. These signals were answered by the rebels at Legareville, two miles distant. The rebel pickets on Folly Island, were also employed during the night in signalizing by means of rockets, sometimes showing white and at others red rockets. The night passed away without any occurrence of importance. --Ne
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