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Clark (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
ging up his own ammunition when men composing powder division had been nearly all killed or wounded. Edward Farrel, Quartermaster, on board the Owasco, in the reduction of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. His intelligence, coolness, and capacity were conspicuous. Peter Williams, seaman, .on board Monitor, in fight with Merrimac, March nineteenth, 1862. Made an acting Master's Mate; but now (March, 1863) an acting Ensign on board Florida. Benjamin Sevearer, sailor, who raised flag on Fort Clark. Deed of noble daring. John Davis, quarter-gunner on board Valley City, in attack of enemy's vessels and a fort near Elizabeth City, North-Carolina, February tenth, 1862. When vessel was on fire near the magazine, seated himself on an open barrel of powder, as the only means to keep the fire out. Charles Kenyon, fireman, on board Galena, in attack upon Drury's Bluff, May fifteenth, 1862. Conspicuous for persistent courage. Jeremiah Regan, Quartermaster, on board Galena, in same a
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
do, on board Pensacola, in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at the taking of New-Orleans, April twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth, 1862; specially commended. Louis Richards, Quarterm on board the Brooklyn, in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at the taking of New-Orleans, April twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth, 1862. Stationed at the wheel. Early in fight painfull Mate, on board Pinola, in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at the taking of New-Orleans. Brave example he set the crew, and faithful manner with which he served his gun, bringing uunner's mate, on board Pinola, in attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the taking of New-Orleans. Berth-deck on fire, he instantly closed the magazine, and remained inside. Thomas Bourne-master. On board the Cayuga, in attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the taking of New-Orleans, April twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth, 1862, Mentioned with praise for their conduct. Char
Franklin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
bravery. Daniel Lakin, seaman; John Williams, seaman; John Breese, Boatswain's Mate; Alfred Peterson, seaman. All on board Commodore Perry, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862, and distinguished themselves by their gallant conduct. Thomas C. Barton, seaman on board Hunchback, in attack upon Franklin, N. C. MeFranklin, N. C. Mentioned for heroic conduct. Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman on board Whitehead, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near BrunswicFranklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near Brunswick, (Ga.,) March eleventh, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy, concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. John Williams, captain maintop, on board Pawnee, in attack upon Mathias Point, June twenty-sixth, 1861. Gallantry cannot be spoken of in too high terms. Though wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh, he retained cha
Mathias Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
duct. Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman on board Whitehead, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near Brunswick, (Ga.,) March eleventh, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy, concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. John Williams, captain maintop, on board Pawnee, in attack upon Mathias Point, June twenty-sixth, 1861. Gallantry cannot be spoken of in too high terms. Though wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh, he retained charge of his boat; and when staff was shot away, held the stump in his hand, with the flag, till we got alongside the Freeborn. J. B. Frisbee, gunner's mate, on board Pinola, in attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the taking of New-Orleans. Berth-deck on fire, he instantly closed the magazine, and remained inside. Thomas Bourne, seaman, W
Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
klin, N. C., October third, 1862, and distinguished themselves by their gallant conduct. Thomas C. Barton, seaman on board Hunchback, in attack upon Franklin, N. C. Mentioned for heroic conduct. Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman on board Whitehead, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near Brunswick, (Ga.,) March eleventh, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy, concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. John Williams, captain maintop, on board Pawnee, in attack upon Mathias Point, June twenty-sixth, 1861. Gallantry cannot be spoken of in too high terms. Though wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh, he retained charge of his boat; and when staff was shot away, held the stump in his hand, with the flag, till we got alongside the Freeborn. J. B. Frisbee, gunner's mate, on b
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
d the Owasco, in the reduction of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. His intelligence, coolness, and capacity were conspicuous. Peter Williams, seaman, .on board Monitor, in fight with Merrimac, March nineteenth, 1862. Made an acting Master's Mate; but now (March, 1863) an acting Ensign on board Florida. Benjamin Sevearer, sailor, who raised flag on Fort Clark. Deed of noble daring. John Davis, quarter-gunner on board Valley City, in attack of enemy's vessels and a fort near Elizabeth City, North-Carolina, February tenth, 1862. When vessel was on fire near the magazine, seated himself on an open barrel of powder, as the only means to keep the fire out. Charles Kenyon, fireman, on board Galena, in attack upon Drury's Bluff, May fifteenth, 1862. Conspicuous for persistent courage. Jeremiah Regan, Quartermaster, on board Galena, in same attack, May fifteenth, 1862. His good conduct attracted the particular attention of his commanding officer. Alexander Hood, Quartermaster,
Valley City (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
rly all killed or wounded. Edward Farrel, Quartermaster, on board the Owasco, in the reduction of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. His intelligence, coolness, and capacity were conspicuous. Peter Williams, seaman, .on board Monitor, in fight with Merrimac, March nineteenth, 1862. Made an acting Master's Mate; but now (March, 1863) an acting Ensign on board Florida. Benjamin Sevearer, sailor, who raised flag on Fort Clark. Deed of noble daring. John Davis, quarter-gunner on board Valley City, in attack of enemy's vessels and a fort near Elizabeth City, North-Carolina, February tenth, 1862. When vessel was on fire near the magazine, seated himself on an open barrel of powder, as the only means to keep the fire out. Charles Kenyon, fireman, on board Galena, in attack upon Drury's Bluff, May fifteenth, 1862. Conspicuous for persistent courage. Jeremiah Regan, Quartermaster, on board Galena, in same attack, May fifteenth, 1862. His good conduct attracted the particular at
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
y's vessels and a fort near Elizabeth City, North-Carolina, February tenth, 1862. When vessel was on fire near the magazine, seated himself on an open barrel of powder, as the only means to keep the fire out. Charles Kenyon, fireman, on board Galena, in attack upon Drury's Bluff, May fifteenth, 1862. Conspicuous for persistent courage. Jeremiah Regan, Quartermaster, on board Galena, in same attack, May fifteenth, 1862. His good conduct attracted the particular attention of his commandingGalena, in same attack, May fifteenth, 1862. His good conduct attracted the particular attention of his commanding officer. Alexander Hood, Quartermaster, John Kelley, second-class fireman. Both on board Ceres, in fight near Hamilton, up Roanoke River, July ninth, 1862, and both spoken of for good conduct and soul-bravery. Daniel Lakin, seaman; John Williams, seaman; John Breese, Boatswain's Mate; Alfred Peterson, seaman. All on board Commodore Perry, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862, and distinguished themselves by their gallant conduct. Thomas C. Barton, seaman on board Hunch
Pawnee City (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
C. Mentioned for heroic conduct. Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman on board Whitehead, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near Brunswick, (Ga.,) March eleventh, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy, concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. John Williams, captain maintop, on board Pawnee, in attack upon Mathias Point, June twenty-sixth, 1861. Gallantry cannot be spoken of in too high terms. Though wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh, he retained charge of his boat; and when staff was shot away, held the stump in his hand, with the flag, till we got alongside the Freeborn. J. B. Frisbee, gunner's mate, on board Pinola, in attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the taking of New-Orleans. Berth-deck on fire, he instantly closed the magazine, and remained inside.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 166
C., October third, 1862, and distinguished themselves by their gallant conduct. Thomas C. Barton, seaman on board Hunchback, in attack upon Franklin, N. C. Mentioned for heroic conduct. Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman on board Whitehead, in attack upon Franklin, N. C., October third, 1862. Swam ashore under the fire of the enemy with a line,and thus rendered important service. Mentioned for gallantry. Daniel Harrington, landsman, on board Pocahontas. Landing in a boat near Brunswick, (Ga.,) March eleventh, 1862, and when fired upon by the enemy, concealed, exhibited great coolness and bravery. John Williams, captain maintop, on board Pawnee, in attack upon Mathias Point, June twenty-sixth, 1861. Gallantry cannot be spoken of in too high terms. Though wounded by a musket-ball in the thigh, he retained charge of his boat; and when staff was shot away, held the stump in his hand, with the flag, till we got alongside the Freeborn. J. B. Frisbee, gunner's mate, on board Pino
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