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This grove was formerly occupied by the buildings of the Arkansas College. At about nine A. M., or a little before, Colonel Munroe led a gallant and desperate cavalry charge upon our right wing, which was met by a galling cross-fire from our right rance of their artillery so that they did not commence the attack as early by nearly two hours as they had intended. Colonel Munroe recommended a cavalry attack, to be supported by the artillery, but was overruled by Cabell, and a halt was made untirroll's First Arkansas cavalry regiment, Colonel Scott, of Virginia, commanding, assisted by Lieutenant-Colonel Thomson. Munroe's Second Arkansas cavalry, Colonel Munroe commanding in person. First battalion Parson's Texas cavalry, Lieutenant-ColonColonel Munroe commanding in person. First battalion Parson's Texas cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Noble commanding. One section of artillery, commanding officer not known, four companies bushwhackers, commanded by Mankins, Palmer, Brown, and others. The enemy left all their dead and.wounded which they could not take away on their retreat in
Doc. 172.-battle of Fayetteville, Ark. Colonel Harrison's report. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 19, 1863. Major-General S. R. Curtis, Commanding Department of the Missouri: General: The following report of the battle of yesterday at Fayetteville, is respectfully submitted, in addition to the telegraphic despatches of last evening. On Friday, seventeenth instant, a scout under command of Lieutenant Robb, First Arkansas cavalry, returned from the direction of Ozark, and reported no apparent preparations of the enemy to move in this direction. Having no fresh horses, I ordered Lieutenant Robb to take his command to quarters, expecting to be able to send a small scout again on the next day. On Saturday morning, eighteenth instant, at a few minutes after sunrise, the enemy having made a forced march from the Boston Mountain during the night, surprised and captured our dismounted picket on the Frog Bayou road, and approached the town with wild and deafening sh
E. D. Hanna (search for this): chapter 182
during the night, surprised and captured our dismounted picket on the Frog Bayou road, and approached the town with wild and deafening shouts. Their cavalry charged up a deep ravine on the east side of the city, and attacked my headquarters, (the Colonel Tibbetts place.) The firing of the picket had alarmed the command, and by the time the enemy had reached town the First Arkansas infantry had formed on their parade-ground, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel E. J. Searle, assisted by Major E. D. Hanna, and slowly retired by my orders, toward the cavalry, then formed, dismounted, at their camp. Fearing that, not being informed, they might be mistaken for the enemy, and be fired upon by the cavalry, I ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Searle to post seven companies as a reserve in a sheltered position in our rear, two of which were afterward ordered to support the left wing. The remaining three companies of the First infantry, together with four companies of the First cavalry, formed the c
iate command. The right wing Was composed of the Third battalion, First cavalry, under command of Major Ezra Fitch; and the left wing, Second battalion, (First Arkansas cavalry,) was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel A. W. Bishop, assisted by Major T. J. Hunt. Headquarters was made the bone of contention, and was repeatedly charged by the rebels, but they were gallantly repulsed by our men. In less than thirty minutes after the first attack, the enemy planted two pieces of artillery-one a twelvehe honor of our flag. Lieutenant-Colonel Searle and Major Ham, in command of the reserve, did good service in keeping their men in position and preventing them from being terrified by the artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel Bishop and Majors Fitch and Hunt, of the First cavalry, led their men coolly up in the face of the enemy's fire, and drove them from their position. Captain W. S. Johnson, company M, First cavalry, had his right arm shattered while leading his men forward under a galling fire.
y at Fayetteville, is respectfully submitted, in addition to the telegraphic despatches of last evening. On Friday, seventeenth instant, a scout under command of Lieutenant Robb, First Arkansas cavalry, returned from the direction of Ozark, and reported no apparent preparations of the enemy to move in this direction. Having no fresh horses, I ordered Lieutenant Robb to take his command to quarters, expecting to be able to send a small scout again on the next day. On Saturday morning, eighteenth instant, at a few minutes after sunrise, the enemy having made a forced march from the Boston Mountain during the night, surprised and captured our dismounted picket on the Frog Bayou road, and approached the town with wild and deafening shouts. Their cavalry charged up a deep ravine on the east side of the city, and attacked my headquarters, (the Colonel Tibbetts place.) The firing of the picket had alarmed the command, and by the time the enemy had reached town the First Arkansas infantry h
Doc. 172.-battle of Fayetteville, Ark. Colonel Harrison's report. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 19, 1863. Major-General S. R. Curtis, Commanding Department of the Missouri: General: The following report of the battle of yesterday at Fayetteville, is respectfully submitted, in addition to the telegraphic despatches of last evening. On Friday, seventeenth instant, a scout under command of Lieutenant Robb, First Arkansas cavalry, returned from the direction of Ozark, and reported no apparent preparations of the enemy to move in this direction. Having no fresh horses, I ordered Lieutenant Robb to take his command to quarters, expecting to be able to send a small scout again on the next day. On Saturday morning, eighteenth instant, at a few minutes after sunrise, the enemy having made a forced march from the Boston Mountain during the night, surprised and captured our dismounted picket on the Frog Bayou road, and approached the town with wild and deafening sh
April 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 182
om you were we placed in a like situation. Under the circumstances, I consider it unnecessary to retain your flag, and therefore return it. Your prisoners shall be paroled, and as fast as the men whose names are mentioned in your list report to our lines, the exchanges will be made. I am, General, very truly yours, M. La Rue Harrison, Colonel Commanding. General order no. 16: read at Divine service, Fayetteville, Sunday, April 19, 1863. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 9, 1863. comrades in arms: Let the eighteenth of April, 1863, be ever remembered. The battle of Fayetteville has been fought and won. To-day the brave and victorious sons of Arkansas stand proudly upon the soil which their blood and their bravery have rendered sacred to every true-hearted American, but doubly sacred to them. In the light of this holy Sabbath sun we are permitted, through God's mercy, to gather together in his name and in the name of our common country, to offer up our heart
April 19th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 182
Doc. 172.-battle of Fayetteville, Ark. Colonel Harrison's report. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 19, 1863. Major-General S. R. Curtis, Commanding Department of the Missouri: General: The following report of the battle of yg to their wants. M. La Rue Harrison, Colonel First Arkansas Cavalry, Commanding. headquarters North-West Arkansas, April 19, 1863. Sir: The bearer of this letter, Captain Alexander, visits your post under a flag of truce to bury any of my commaest Arkansas. To Colonel M. La Rue Harrison, Commanding Post of Fayetteville. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 19, 1863. Brigadier-General W. L. Cabell, Commanding. General: In reply to despatches from you by hand of Captain Alexanderly yours, M. La Rue Harrison, Colonel Commanding. General order no. 16: read at Divine service, Fayetteville, Sunday, April 19, 1863. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 9, 1863. comrades in arms: Let the eighteenth of April, 1863, be
April 18th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 182
r the circumstances, I consider it unnecessary to retain your flag, and therefore return it. Your prisoners shall be paroled, and as fast as the men whose names are mentioned in your list report to our lines, the exchanges will be made. I am, General, very truly yours, M. La Rue Harrison, Colonel Commanding. General order no. 16: read at Divine service, Fayetteville, Sunday, April 19, 1863. Headquarters Post, Fayetteville, Ark., April 9, 1863. comrades in arms: Let the eighteenth of April, 1863, be ever remembered. The battle of Fayetteville has been fought and won. To-day the brave and victorious sons of Arkansas stand proudly upon the soil which their blood and their bravery have rendered sacred to every true-hearted American, but doubly sacred to them. In the light of this holy Sabbath sun we are permitted, through God's mercy, to gather together in his name and in the name of our common country, to offer up our heartfelt thanks to the Giver of every good and perfect
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