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Travisville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
ave time to take his position; Day's battalion was on the extreme left. Colonel Morrison, under the circumstances, was ordered to fill back in the direction of Travisville, as the enemy were crossing the river at Greary Creek, only a few miles below, with two regiments of infantry, two of cavalry, and a heavy battery of artillery.nt a despatch to Colonel Morrison, requesting reenforcements, as the enemy were pressing him. Colonel Carter was detached and ordered to his relief. He came to Travisville, and lo! Chenault had sent Major Coff's command and the First Louisiana to that point, whilst he and Cluke struck a bee line in the direction of Middle Tennessing Colonel Morrison or the reenforcements of his having left the position he had been holding that evening. Our brigade came through from the Albany road to Travisville unmolested but not whipped, for we had maintained our position and forced the enemy from theirs. Stragglers who were prejudiced against Colonel Morrison, and w
Mill Springs (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
nd Twelfth Illinois regiments, mounted, and Law's mountain howitzer battery, were to cross at Mill Springs. The infantry had no trouble in crossing. At Mill Springs they had but one small boat. In Mill Springs they had but one small boat. In this they were compelled to carry men, saddles, and artillery, while the horses were to swim. Only a part of the mounted force reached the infantry that night. The cavalry, under Captain Alexander, It was necessary to reach this point in order to cover both the road from the ferry and from Mill Springs. The night was a scene of bustle and activity incident to the arriving and disposing of troost a number of horses, that the Second and Seventh Ohio cavalry were yet on the other side at Mill Springs, and that a deep fog had settled down upon the ford. Next, word came that the one small boatly relies upon Him who doeth all things well. At an early hour, Colonel Carter was sent to Mill Springs, to superintend the crossing of the remainder of the cavalry, and rendered valuable assistanc
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
hundred and fifty rebel cavalry now presented themselves, charging upon our pickets, who fell back upon the main body. Considerable firing continued for an hour, when the rebels, discovering that it would be scarcely safe to press matters, withdrew. Lieutenant Law, of the mountain howitzer battery, no sooner heard of skirmishing in front, than he placed one of his pieces in the boat, and hurrying across, soon had it in position. Thus a part of the force sent out to relieve this part of Kentucky, was finally placed on this side the river, that seems to have been considered the boundary-line between Secessia and the real Government. After the commander was compelled to battle with the elements he could not control, a passage was finally effected, and the troops, in high glee, marched out at three o'clock, to find the enemy. Eleven miles were made in four hours. A somewhat amusing incident occurred this morning this side the ferry. Captain Alexander, with a squad of men, having cr
Wilder (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
At half-past 8 o'clock the infantry began to cross at Stigold's Ferry. First came the One Hundred and Third Ohio, next the Second East-Tennessee, followed by the Wilder battery and the Twenty-seventh New-Jersey. Captain Alexander, of the First Kentucky, had crossed above, the night before, with three hundred men, while the remain, One hundred and Third Ohio, and Twenty-seventh New-Jersey reached town about eleven o'clock, having made a splendid march, and in high spirits for a fight. The Wilder battery immediately followed them, and took position to watch the approach from the main road to Albany. On our way we came to a family standing near their dwe, canteens, etc., leaving their track marked by a shower of greasy butternut garments. The Second East-Tennessee, Colonel Carter, arriving, with a section of the Wilder battery, under Lieut. Ricketts, the Forty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Runkle, with one of the guns, was ordered to the support of Col. Wolford, who, with his short-range
Steubenville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
eth all things well. At an early hour, Colonel Carter was sent to Mill Springs, to superintend the crossing of the remainder of the cavalry, and rendered valuable assistance to those who were still on the other side of the river. At six o'clock a detachment of calvary, under command of Captain Carter, was ordered to advance cautiously in the direction of Monticello. This consisted of part of the First Kentucky, and Second and Seventh Ohio cavalry. Our advance came upon the rebels at Steubenville, five miles north of the town. From there till the rebels passed through Monticello and over the creek, there was constant skirmishing. For a distance of two miles north of this place, the rebels went as fast as their horses could take them, pursued by our cavalry, that dashed through the farms which spread from hill to hill. Just outside the town, one hundred and fifty rebels drew up in line, and charged upon our advance, but all to no purpose, for they were driven back, and passed th
Jamestown, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
he position they had taken on the hill to the left of the Jamestown road. The force consisted of Chenault's regiment. They going direct; the other leading out, in the direction of Jamestown, four and a half miles, and then turning sharply to the rwhether from choice or necessity, I do not know, took the Jamestown road — our troops skirmishing with them as they retired. sk of being caught between two fires. If they kept on to Jamestown, they would deprive themselves of the reeforcements they k the other road, in hopes of rendering assistance on the Jamestown road. No one estimates them at less than one thousand fione or two small howitzers. They had not yet reached the Jamestown road, but were rapidly approaching, with an audacity that from Monticello back to where the Albany road leaves the Jamestown road, had fallen back nine miles, thus cutting off all communication with Colonel Morrison and the force on the Jamestown road. Captain Day's battalion was the advance. He, true to
Beaver Creek, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
s, that have to be answered for by the authors of this unholy rebellion! There are two roads leading to Albany, in Clinton County, one turning to the right, as we leave Monticello, and going direct; the other leading out, in the direction of Jamestown, four and a half miles, and then turning sharply to the right, by which the former would be reached about eight miles from this lace; the latter, three miles from Monticello, winds around through a deep, will gorge, at the bottom of which Beaver Creek rushes along over the rough rocks that form its bed. A few men here could hold an army at bay as long as they desired. The enemy, whether from choice or necessity, I do not know, took the Jamestown road — our troops skirmishing with them as they retired. Upon arriving at the pass to which I have alluded, they became more obstinate, but finally gave back, making a poor resistance, compared with their opportunities. Upon reaching the forks of the road at the top of the hill, they seemed
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
gold's Ferry. First came the One Hundred and Third Ohio, next the Second East-Tennessee, followed by the Wilder battery and the Twenty-seventh New-Jersey. Captain Alble-quick, leaving coats, haversacks, and arms on the way. The Second East-Tennessee, One hundred and Third Ohio, and Twenty-seventh New-Jersey reached town abouttheir track marked by a shower of greasy butternut garments. The Second East-Tennessee, Colonel Carter, arriving, with a section of the Wilder battery, under Lieut. are coming in every hour. It was rather a singular spectacle to see an East-Tennessee prisoner having numerous friends come up to give him a hearty shake of the haa to that point, whilst he and Cluke struck a bee line in the direction of Middle Tennessee--without notifying Colonel Morrison or the reenforcements of his having lel Morrison, and were too cowardly to remain in the field, skulked off to East-Tennessee to tell the tales of disaster and scandal. Our loss was two killed, nine w
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
ut at three o'clock, to find the enemy. Eleven miles were made in four hours. A somewhat amusing incident occurred this morning this side the ferry. Captain Alexander, with a squad of men, having crossed the night before, came suddenly from the south upon Mr. Stigold, a man of rebel proclivities, who supposed that the rebel pickets had returned again to the river, and gave what he considered his friends a very warm reception. The old man was somewhat taken aback when he was walked off to Somerset under a guard. About eleven o'clock in the morning, Captain Mullen, of the rebel army, who afterward attacked our advance, came to Captain West to engage boarding for thirty rebel pickets for a few days, to begin the same evening, clearly indicating that they were not looking for us so soon. In the mean time Uncle Abe's boys dropped in and had the impudence to eat the supper the rebels had themselves expected to partake of. The infantry did not reach Captain West's till after dark. It wa
Albany, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 191
uld not be hurt. Such is war! Who can tell of the broken hearts, the wails of sorrow, the tears, the widows' and orphans' cries, that have to be answered for by the authors of this unholy rebellion! There are two roads leading to Albany, in Clinton County, one turning to the right, as we leave Monticello, and going direct; the other leading out, in the direction of Jamestown, four and a half miles, and then turning sharply to the right, by which the former would be reached about eight miht was evidently the command of Pegram, numbering one thousand eight hundred men. Sidney. --Cincinnati Commercial. Rebel account of the battle. Early on the morning of the first instant, Colonel Morrison, then commanding our brigade at Albany, Kentucky, received despatches from Colonel Chenault, at Monticello, to the effect that he was holding the enemy in check, that their force consisted of only three regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, including four pieces of artillery, and if he
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