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Saint Francis (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
Doc. 186.-Clayton's raid in Arkansas. A National account. Helena, Arkansas, May 15, 1863. Having been along with the expedition that has just returned from White River, Bayou de Vieu, and Saint Francis, I will endeavor to give you a slight sketch of the most important incidents, and of the battle at Mount Vernon, Saint Francis County, between Colonel Carter's Texas Rangers and the Fifth Kansas cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins. On the morning of the sixth ultimo, an expedition left this point, having for its object the thorough scouring of the country lying west, to the White River, north to Bayou de Vieu, and east to the Saint Francis, the destruction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-fiv
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
Doc. 186.-Clayton's raid in Arkansas. A National account. Helena, Arkansas, May 15, 1863. Having been along with the expedition that has just returned from White River, Bayou de Vieu, and Saint Francis, I will endeavor to give you a slight sketch of the most important incidents, and of the battle at Mount Vernon, Saint Francis County, between Colonel Carter's Texas Rangers and the Fifth Kansas cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins. On the morning of the sixth ultimo, an expedition left this point, having for its object the thorough scouring of the country lying west, to the White River, north to Bayou de Vieu, and east to the Saint Francis, the destruction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-five
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
ng been along with the expedition that has just returned from White River, Bayou de Vieu, and Saint Francis, I will endeavor to give you a slight sketch of the most important incidents, and of the battle at Mount Vernon, Saint Francis County, between Colonel Carter's Texas Rangers and the Fifth Kansas cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins. On the morning of the sixth ultimo, an expedition left this point, having for its object the thorough scouring of the country lying west, to the White River, north to Bayou de Vieu, and east to the Saint Francis, the destruction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-five men; First Indiana cavalry, two hundred and fifty men, and one section of the Dubuque battery; all under c
Marianna (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
casional guerrilla squad. After grazing our jaded horses, (for there was no corn,) we started next morning for Madison, on the Saint Francis, and Wittsburgh, fifteen or twenty miles above, while the infantry returned to Helena by way of Moreau, Marianna, and Lagrange. The road from Switzer's to the l'anguille River is known as the Military road, and goes to Memphis. For about six miles it leads through a level prairie, and then striking the timber, it is a corduroy or causeway, not wide enoon the morning of the twelfth, we commenced crossing our horses, and by noon we had swam seven hundred and twenty-five horses over a deep river one hundred yards wide, and crossed all the men without a single accident. The infantry returning to Marianna, caused Dobbins to change camp. The Fifth Kansas will now bet their bottom dollar on their Lieutenant-Colonel, as well as their Majors, Sam Walker and T. W. Scudder. Col. Clayton arrived at Helena on the morning of the thirteenth, and the
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
Doc. 186.-Clayton's raid in Arkansas. A National account. Helena, Arkansas, May 15, 1863. Having been along with the expedition that has just returned from White River, Bayou de Vieu, and Saint Francis, I will endeavor to give you a slight sketch of the most important incidents, and of the battle at Mount Vernon, Saint Francis County, between Colonel Carter's Texas Rangers and the Fifth Kansas cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins. On the morning of the sixth ultimo, an expedition left this point, having for its object the thorough scouring of the country lying west, to the White River, north to Bayou de Vieu, and east to the Saint Francis, the destruction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-five
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
uction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-five men; First d of Colonel Powell Clayton, Fifth Kansas cavalry, at present commanding the Second brigade, Second cavalry division, army of Tennessee. They all left on the Little Rock road; but about six miles out, the infantry took the Moreau and Cotton Plant road, expecting to meet Coleman at Switzer's, on the prairie, seven miles from Cotts for his outspoken and determined Unionism. Dozens of persons will testify to this to the very letter. Cobb had taken the precaution to leave, and is safe at Little Rock. Let him beware, should ever the Fifth Kansas get him; a short shrift and a long rope will be his reward. The next morning, about two P. M., a despatch came
Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
le Rock road; but about six miles out, the infantry took the Moreau and Cotton Plant road, expecting to meet Coleman at Switzer's, on the prairie, seven miles from Cotton Plant. The cavalry marched to the crossing of Big Creek the first day, and proceeded to build a pontoon-bridge, the rebels having burned the old bridge early last fall. That night, by midnight, the bridge was completed, and by noon the next day the whole command was safely over. We then marched to within eight miles of Clarendon, and encamped upon a plantation where the rebels kept a picket-post. Our men fired upon their pickets, killing one and taking one prisoner. They also got a fine Sharpe's target rifle and uniform coat — confederate, of course. On the morning of the eighth the Colonel sent Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins, with the Fifth Kansas, off the road about eight miles, for the purpose of getting a camp of negroes, who were sent there by their masters to keep them out of our way. Taking a guide, the
Dubuque (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
lying west, to the White River, north to Bayou de Vieu, and east to the Saint Francis, the destruction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-five men; First Indiana cavalry, two hundred and fifty men, and one section of the Dubuque battery; all under command of Colonel Powell Clayton, Fifth Kansas cavalry, at present commanding the Second brigade, Second cavalry division, army of Tennessee. They all left on the Little Rock road; but about six miles out, the infantry took the Moreau and Cotton Plant road, expecting to meet Coleman at Switzer's, on the prairie, seven miles from Cotton Plant. The cavalry marched to the crossing of Big Creek the first day, and proceeded to build a pontoon-bridge, the rebels having bur
Moreau (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
ery; all under command of Colonel Powell Clayton, Fifth Kansas cavalry, at present commanding the Second brigade, Second cavalry division, army of Tennessee. They all left on the Little Rock road; but about six miles out, the infantry took the Moreau and Cotton Plant road, expecting to meet Coleman at Switzer's, on the prairie, seven miles from Cotton Plant. The cavalry marched to the crossing of Big Creek the first day, and proceeded to build a pontoon-bridge, the rebels having burned the oept an occasional guerrilla squad. After grazing our jaded horses, (for there was no corn,) we started next morning for Madison, on the Saint Francis, and Wittsburgh, fifteen or twenty miles above, while the infantry returned to Helena by way of Moreau, Marianna, and Lagrange. The road from Switzer's to the l'anguille River is known as the Military road, and goes to Memphis. For about six miles it leads through a level prairie, and then striking the timber, it is a corduroy or causeway, not
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 196
Doc. 186.-Clayton's raid in Arkansas. A National account. Helena, Arkansas, May 15, 1863. Having been along with the expedition that has just returned from White River, Bayou de Vieu, and Saint Francis, I will endeavor to give you a slight sketch of the most important incidents, and of the battle at Mount Vernon, Saint Francis County, between Colonel Carter's Texas Rangers and the Fifth Kansas cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins. On the morning of the sixth ultimo, an expedition left this point, having for its object the thorough scouring of the country lying west, to the White River, north to Bayou de Vieu, and east to the Saint Francis, the destruction of all forage likely to subsist the enemy, and ascertaining the whereabouts of General Price's forces, who were reported as marching upon this place from Little Rock. The troops comprising this expedition were the Fifth Illinois cavalry, four hundred men; the Fifth Kansas cavalry, three hundred and twenty-fiv
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