hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 702 0 Browse Search
Doc 416 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) 318 4 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 263 15 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 238 14 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 229 7 Browse Search
James G. Blunt 163 1 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 149 7 Browse Search
Robert L. McCook 149 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 377 total hits in 99 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Massaponax Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
circular plain six miles in length and two or three in depth, inclosed within their circumference before they again approach the river in the neighborhood of Massaponax Creek. Immediately above the town, and on the left of the confederate position, the bluffs are bold and bare of trees; but as the hills in their eastward course rentre and right of the confederate army was posted, stretching for a distance of six miles from the extreme left, and ending in the immediate neighborhood of Massaponax Creek, which joins the Rappahannock some five miles below Fredericksburgh. It will be apparent to the reader, that the left of the confederate army, a portion of eme confederate right, General J. E. B. Stuart, with his cavalry and horse-artillery, covered the flank of the confederate line, his rear almost resting upon Massaponax Creek. As regards the disposition of the Federal troops, nothing more is known than that the three great bodies of troops were commanded, that on the Federal ri
Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ow riddled by round-shot — belonging to Mr. Marye, and are commonly called Marye's Heights. At their base a road winds, protected on one side by the hills, and on t and most effective of fires. A little further back, to the south-east of Marye's Heights, stands another and higher hill, from which the most commanding view of thinst the advancing columns of Pennsylvanians; but next to the batteries on Marye's Heights and General Lee's hill, I should say that the artillery commanded by Col. forming, under the withering fire of the confederate batteries, to attack Marye's Heights, towering immediately in their front. Never at Fontenoy, Albuera, or at Wousand battlefields, and never more richly deserved it than at the foot of Marye's Heights on the thirteenth day of December, 1862. An opportunity of sending thisoot us down, may hang us, or do what you like, but back there, pointing at Marye's Heights, we will never go again. I forbear to state the estimates of the Federal
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
gh light through the mist to disclose the near proximity of the Federal lines and field-batteries. The first shot was fired shortly before ten A. M. from the batteries in the Federal centre, and was directed against Gen. Hood's division. The Pennsylvania reserves advanced boldly under a heavy fire against the confederates who occupied one of the copsewood spurs, and were for a time permitted to hold it; but presently the confederate batteries opened on them, and a determined charge of the Texaeral loss in officers and men far outbalanced that of their opponents. General Bayard, the best cavalry officer in the Federal service, and almost on the eve of the day which would have witnessed his nuptials, was killed, and Gen. Jackson, of Pennsylvania, shared his fate. Many other general officers were carried to the Federal rear, grievously wounded; whereas of the confederates only one officer of rank (General Gregg) fell upon the right, and only one (General Cobb) upon the left. Meanwh
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
s, representing six regiments, and on the whole covering themselves with ineffaceable glory. At half-past 8 A. M. Gen. Lee, attended by his staff, rode slowly along the front of our lines, from west to east, and halted in the valley a mile to the east of Hamilton's crossing, and half a mile in the rear of our batteries on the extreme right. At nine o'clock a column of our troops, which proved to be Ewell's division, General Early commanding, advanced up the valley from the direction of Port Royal, and defiled into the woods to the left of Hamilton's crossing. The men were marching at a very leisurely pace, with a careless, swinging gait; but there was that in the quiet dignity of their demeanor which told that each though undaunted, was conscious that the next hour might be one of stern battle and death. Scarcely had the rear of this division disappeared in the woods, when directly in their front the artillery of the old Stonewall brigade--Woodis, Braxton's, and three other batte
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
appeared in the woods, when directly in their front the artillery of the old Stonewall brigade--Woodis, Braxton's, and three other batteries — opened a brisk fire on the enemy's batteries north of the railroad. At this time, owing to the fog, few of the enemy's infantry were visible. After-events proved that they were lying close to the south bank of the river. The cannonading soon became general along the front of both armies. In ten minutes from the time of firing their first gun, the Danville battery, Capt. Woodis, had lost fifteen men killed and wounded, a number of horses, and had two guns disabled. The enemy's battery, eight hundred yards distant, had the exact range from the first fire. In the beginning of the action the loss of the other batteries of Taliaferro's division, were also quite heavy. Our men fired with great precision, their shells bursting in front or directly above his opposing batteries. In the course of an hour the artillery fight had become so general
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
he line of fire. battle-field near Hamilton's crossing, December 14, 1862. The fighting yesterday at Fredericksburgh and near Stansbury Hill, just above the town, was of the most desperate character, and was of signal advantage to our cause, resulting as it did, in decided successes to our arms in the repulses of the lines of tile enemy at all points. These repulses were achieved with but slight loss to our side in numbers, though with the death of the gallant General T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, who fell near the spot where his mother was married. The fight on our side was conducted with judgment, discretion, and signal success. Our men were arranged behind the stone fence running along the roadside leading from Howison's Mill to the point where the telegraph and turnpike fork. The enemy were formed in the field just opposite and on the Fair grounds. The enemy advanced steadily and boldly twenty-one times, and was as often repulsed with dreadful slaughter and carnage. The Yan
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
uth of the Deep Run. The plan on which Fredericksburgh stands is so completely commanded by the several hundred yards in the direction of Fredericksburgh. Hill's and Early's troops had driven er 14, 1862. The fighting yesterday at Fredericksburgh and near Stansbury Hill, just above the tright and the stone fence on the left, at Fredericksburgh. No other man than Burnside would have aof Northern troops across the pontoons at Fredericksburgh and Deep Run, and one or two other bridgened not more than four hundred yards from Fredericksburgh, occupied a much stronger position than t omit to add that the railroad track from Fredericksburgh to Richmond runs diagonally through the sine of battle three and a half miles from Fredericksburgh, at a point called Hamilton's crossing. heights in the immediate neighborhood of Fredericksburgh, not more than four hundred yards from thy with the whisky found in the cellars of Fredericksburgh. After witnessing the gallantry and devo[16 more...]
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
supply such an army as General McClellan led against Richmond, will carry conviction to the European public. It is impossible for me to describe the positions of each of the numerous confederate batteries which stretched along the length of their six-mile line of battle. It will suffice, if I indicate the batteries which were most hotly engaged, and bore the brunt of the action. By far the most important position was occupied by the Washington artillery, commanded by Col. Walton, of New-Orleans, and posted on the heights in the immediate neighborhood of Fredericksburgh, not more than four hundred yards from the town. These heights, which are precisely of that altitude which is most favorable for the play of artillery, are surmounted by a brick house — now riddled by round-shot — belonging to Mr. Marye, and are commonly called Marye's Heights. At their base a road winds, protected on one side by the hills, and on the other by a solid stone wall, about four feet in height, over
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Rebel reports and Narratives. General Lee's official report. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, 14 December, 1862. The Hon. Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.: sir: On the night of the tenth instant, the enemy commenced to throw three bridges over the Rappahannock--two at Fredericksburgh, and the third about a mile and a quarter below, near the mouth of the Deep Run. The plan on which Fredericksburgh stands is so completely commanded by the hills of Stafford, in possession of the enemy, that no effectual opposition could be offered to the construction of the bridges or the passage of the river, without exposing our troops to the destructive fire of his numerous batteries. Positions were, therefore, selected to oppose his advance after crossing. The narrowness of the Rappahannock, its winding course and deep bed, afforded opportunity for the construction of bridges at points beyond the reach of our artillery, and the banks had to be watched by skirmishers. The latt
Stafford Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ommenced to throw three bridges over the Rappahannock--two at Fredericksburgh, and the third about a mile and a quarter below, near the mouth of the Deep Run. The plan on which Fredericksburgh stands is so completely commanded by the hills of Stafford, in possession of the enemy, that no effectual opposition could be offered to the construction of the bridges or the passage of the river, without exposing our troops to the destructive fire of his numerous batteries. Positions were, therefore,tremendous. The air was resonant with the savage music of shells and solid shot. The white smoke-wreaths of exploding shells were everywhere visible among the trees of the forest, which hid our forces in the valley and away beyond the river in Stafford. Lines of ambulances could be seen bearing off the wounded of both armies, but there was nothing by which to judge that the advantage rested with either side. At noon the fog had cleared away, but there was a thick haze in the atmosphere. A
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...