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Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
he old battle-ground of July, 1861. Knowing that Longstreet was not distant, he made a most desperate stand. The fight continued nearly all day, and was terminated only by darkness. We had gained considerable ground, but nothing was decided when the battle closed. It was renewed the next morning, and after another day's hard fighting, our forces fell back behind Bull Run, the enemy not attempting any pursuit. Two days later, however, he threw a considerable force between Chantilly and Germantown to turn Pope's right. Hooker dislodged them after a short but severe engagement, in which Brig.-Gens. Kearny and Stevens, two of our very best officers, were killed. Pope's army had been reenforced by the corps of Franklin and Sumner, and no further apprehensions were felt for its safety. During the operations of the previous week, of which we received very favorable but not trustworthy accounts, every effort was made to push forward supplies and reenforcements to General Pope's army.
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
l troops which were not required for the defence of Washington. Several corps were immediately thrown out in observation at Darnestown and Leesboro, and most of his army was in motion by the fifth of September. A portion entered Frederick on the twelfth. As the campaign was to be carried on within the department commanded by Major-Gen. Wool, I directed Gen. McClellan to assume control of all troops within his reach, without regard to departmental lines. The garrisons of Winchester and Martinsburgh had been withdrawn to Harper's Ferry, and the commanding officer of that post had been advised by my chief of staff to mainly confine his defence, in case he was attacked by superior forces, to the position of Maryland Heights, which could have been held a long time against over-whelming numbers. To withdraw him entirely from that position, with the great body of Lee's forces between him and our army, would not only expose the garrison to capture, but all the artillery and stores collect
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
f the Mississippi in July last, the main body of the army under Major-Gen. Buell was between Huntsville and Stevenson, moving toward Chattanooga, for which place they had left Corinth about the tenth of June. Major-Gen. Curtis's forces were at Helena, Arkansas, and those under Brig.-Gen. Schofield in South-western Missouri. The central army, under Major-Gen. Grant, occupying the line of West-Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, extended from Memphis to Iuka, and protected the railroads from Columbus south, which were then our only channels of supply. These several armies spread along a line of some six hundred miles from the western borders of Arkansas to Cumberland Gap, and occupying a strip of country more than one hundred and fifty miles in width, from which the enemy's forces had recently been expelled, were rapidly decreasing in strength from the large numbers of soldiers sent home on account of real or pretended disability. On the other hand, the enemy's armies were greatly i
Pocotaligo (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
onville.) In the department of the South the only military operations which have been undertaken were the reconnoissances of the Pocotaligo and Coosahatchie Rivers. These expeditions under Brig.-Gen. Brannan and Col. Barton, encountered a considerable force of the enemy on the twenty-second of October, and engagements ensued, in which we lost thirty-two killed and one hundred and eighty wounded. The official reports of these engagements are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 8 (See Pocotaligo, S. C.) In the department of North-Carolina our force has also been too small to attempt any important offensive operations. On time sixth of September a party of the enemy surprised the garrison of Washington, but were soon driven out. Our loss was eight killed and thirty-six wounded, and that of the enemy thirty-three killed and about one hundred wounded. Several successful reconnoissances have been made into the interior. The official reports of the affair at Washington are marked
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
d not doubt its correctness. This gave me serious uneasiness for the safety of the capital and Maryland, and I repeatedly urged upon Gen. McClellan the necessity of promptly moving his army so as to pon Washington would now be futile, Lee pushed his main army across the Potomac for a raid into Maryland and Pennsylvania. Gen. McClellan was directed to pursue him with all troops which were not requd army under Col. Miles's command. General McClellan's preliminary report of his operations in Maryland, including the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam, is submitted herewith, marked Exhibit Nohe States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, while our attention was distracted by the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and an extended Indian insurrection on the Western frontiers. This plan had suer has very little hope of overtaking his flying foe. But this reasoning is not applicable to Maryland, and the greater part of Virginia, Kentucky, and Middle Tennessee. It must be admitted that in
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
er, however, had just before reported that he had several weeks' provisions, and under no circumstances would he surrender that important post. An investigation of this matter has been ordered. The withdrawal of a considerable part of Gen. Grant's army to reinforce Gen. Buell and to occupy Zanesville and Cincinnati, induced the enemy to renew operations in Northern Mississippi and Western Tennessee. A force of some five thousand or six thousand men was sent to attack Bolivar and Jackson, Tennessee, and by destroying the railroad to cut off all connection between Memphis and Corinth. The head of the enemy's column was met about four miles south of Bolivar on the thirtieth of August, and a brisk skirmish ensued. On the thirty-first, a portion of the enemy's forces was engaged and repulsed near Meadow Station. On the first of September the fight was renewed at Britton's Lane, on the Denmark road, and continued till night, when the enemy retreated south, across the Hatchie, leav
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
nois, while our attention was distracted by the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and an extended Indian insurrection on the Western frontiers. This plan had very many chances of success; but the timely order of the President of August fourth, calling for additional forces, and the patriotic response of the people of the North-West, thwarted the enemy's well-formed calculations. Gen. Bragg suddenly transferred a large part of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, through the States of Alabama and Georgia, reached Chattanooga in advance of Gen. Buell, turned his left, and, rapidly crossing the State of Tennessee, entered Kentucky by Munfordsville and Lebanon. Gen. Buell fell back upon Nashville, without giving the enemy battle — then followed, or rather moved parallel with Bragg, who, after capturing our garrison at Munfordsville, turned off from the main road to Louisville, along which Gen. Buell passed — the latter reaching Louisville without any engagement. Another column
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ry effort had been made to collect new troops at Cincinnati and Louisville, and to fortify these places against a coup de main. To give confidence to the new levies, a portion of Gen. Grant's army was withdrawn from Mississippi and sent to Kentucky and Cincinnati. No attack was attempted by the enemy. Major-Gen. Buell left Louisville on the first of October, with an army of about one hundred thousand men in pursuit of General Bragg. The latter engaged a part of Gen. Buell's army at Perryville, about ten o'clock on the eighth of October. A general battle ensued, and was continued till dark; it was mainly fought by Major. Geon. McCook's corps ; the enemy retreated during the night; the losses were heavy on both sides, but no official reports of the numbers engaged or the losses on either side have been received. After this battle, the main army of the Rebels retreated to East-Tennessee; Gen. Buell pursued it as far as Mount Vernon or London, then fell back to the line from Lou
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ial messenger, who delivered it to Gen. McClellan at Rectortown on the seventh. When I left the department of the Mississippi in July last, the main body of the army under Major-Gen. Buell was between Huntsville and Stevenson, moving toward Chattanooga, for which place they had left Corinth about the tenth of June. Major-Gen. Curtis's forces were at Helena, Arkansas, and those under Brig.-Gen. Schofield in South-western Missouri. The central army, under Major-Gen. Grant, occupying the line and the patriotic response of the people of the North-West, thwarted the enemy's well-formed calculations. Gen. Bragg suddenly transferred a large part of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, through the States of Alabama and Georgia, reached Chattanooga in advance of Gen. Buell, turned his left, and, rapidly crossing the State of Tennessee, entered Kentucky by Munfordsville and Lebanon. Gen. Buell fell back upon Nashville, without giving the enemy battle — then followed, or rather moved pa
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
our attention was distracted by the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and an extended Indian insurrection on the Western frontiers. This plan had very many chances of success; but the timely order of the President of August fourth, calling for additional forces, and the patriotic response of the people of the North-West, thwarted the enemy's well-formed calculations. Gen. Bragg suddenly transferred a large part of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, through the States of Alabama and Georgia, reached Chattanooga in advance of Gen. Buell, turned his left, and, rapidly crossing the State of Tennessee, entered Kentucky by Munfordsville and Lebanon. Gen. Buell fell back upon Nashville, without giving the enemy battle — then followed, or rather moved parallel with Bragg, who, after capturing our garrison at Munfordsville, turned off from the main road to Louisville, along which Gen. Buell passed — the latter reaching Louisville without any engagement. Another column of the enemy
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