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Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
Exhibit no. 8. [no. 58.]headquarters army of Virginia, August 25--9 P. M. Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: The column of the enemy alluded to in my despatch of half-past 12 P. M. to-day, passed Gaines Gross-Roads, and when last seen near sunset was passing to the north-east under the east base of Buck Mountain in the direction of Salem and Rectortown. I am inclined to believe that this column is only covering the flank of the main body, which is moving toward Front Royal and Thornton's Gap, though of this I am not certain. I shall push a strong reconnoissance across the river at Waterloo bridge and Sulphur Springs early in the morning, to ascertain whether the main body of the enemy has really left, and if so, to push forward in their rear. There is certainly no force opposite Rappahannock Station. McDowell's is the only corps, that is at all reliable, that I have. Sigel, as you know, is perfectly unreliable, and I suggest that some officer of superior ra
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
over thirty thousand. He also reported that he was then sending to that army all the horses he could procure. On the eighteenth, Gen. McClellan stated: In regard to Gen. Meigs's report that he had filled every requisition for shoes and clothing, General Meigs may have ordered these articles to be forwarded, but they have not reached our depots, and unless greater effort to insure prompt transmission is made by the department of which Gen. Meigs is the head, they might as well remain in New-York or Philadelphia, so far as this army is concerned. I immediately called Gen. Meigs's attention to this apparent neglect of his department. On the twenty-fifth, he reported as the result of his investigation, that forty-eight thousand pairs of boots and shoes had been received by the Quartermaster of Gen. McClellan's army at Harper's Ferry, Frederick, and Hagerstown; that twenty thousand pairs were at Harper's Ferry depot on the twenty-first; that ten thousand more were on their way, and f
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 63
eneral. Exhibit no. 5. war Department--Washington City, October 27, 1862. General: It has been publjor-General Halleck, official. General-in-Chief. Washington, October 28, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary in order that, if he moved between the enemy and Washington reenforcements could be sent from this place. Oner week for the entire army there and in front of Washington. I immediately directed the Quartermaster-Generaen. McClellan's army in the field and in front of Washington for the previous six weeks had been one thousand y mails, he has been in hourly communication with Washington by telegraph. It is due to Gen. Meigs that I shopy of the telegram of the sixth instant: Washington, D. C., October 6, 1862. Major-General McClellan: od. If you cross the river between the enemy and Washington, and cover the latter by your line of operation, . The President advises the interior line between Washington and the enemy, but does not order it. He is very
Frederick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
d unless greater effort to insure prompt transmission is made by the department of which Gen. Meigs is the head, they might as well remain in New-York or Philadelphia, so far as this army is concerned. I immediately called Gen. Meigs's attention to this apparent neglect of his department. On the twenty-fifth, he reported as the result of his investigation, that forty-eight thousand pairs of boots and shoes had been received by the Quartermaster of Gen. McClellan's army at Harper's Ferry, Frederick, and Hagerstown; that twenty thousand pairs were at Harper's Ferry depot on the twenty-first; that ten thousand more were on their way, and fifteen thousand more ordered. Col. Ingals, Aid-de-Camp and Chief Quartermaster to Gen. McClellan, telegraphed on the twenty-fifth: The suffering for want of clothing is exaggerated, I think, and certainly might have been avoided by timely requisitions of regimental and brigade commanders. On the twenty-fourth, he telegraphed to the Quartermaster-G
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
r effort to insure prompt transmission is made by the department of which Gen. Meigs is the head, they might as well remain in New-York or Philadelphia, so far as this army is concerned. I immediately called Gen. Meigs's attention to this apparent neglect of his department. On the twenty-fifth, he reported as the result of his investigation, that forty-eight thousand pairs of boots and shoes had been received by the Quartermaster of Gen. McClellan's army at Harper's Ferry, Frederick, and Hagerstown; that twenty thousand pairs were at Harper's Ferry depot on the twenty-first; that ten thousand more were on their way, and fifteen thousand more ordered. Col. Ingals, Aid-de-Camp and Chief Quartermaster to Gen. McClellan, telegraphed on the twenty-fifth: The suffering for want of clothing is exaggerated, I think, and certainly might have been avoided by timely requisitions of regimental and brigade commanders. On the twenty-fourth, he telegraphed to the Quartermaster-General that: The
Rectortown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
Exhibit no. 8. [no. 58.]headquarters army of Virginia, August 25--9 P. M. Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: The column of the enemy alluded to in my despatch of half-past 12 P. M. to-day, passed Gaines Gross-Roads, and when last seen near sunset was passing to the north-east under the east base of Buck Mountain in the direction of Salem and Rectortown. I am inclined to believe that this column is only covering the flank of the main body, which is moving toward Front Royal and Thornton's Gap, though of this I am not certain. I shall push a strong reconnoissance across the river at Waterloo bridge and Sulphur Springs early in the morning, to ascertain whether the main body of the enemy has really left, and if so, to push forward in their rear. There is certainly no force opposite Rappahannock Station. McDowell's is the only corps, that is at all reliable, that I have. Sigel, as you know, is perfectly unreliable, and I suggest that some officer of superior ran
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
Exhibit no. 8. [no. 58.]headquarters army of Virginia, August 25--9 P. M. Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: The column of the enemy alluded to in my despatch of half-past 12 P. M. to-day, passed Gaines Gross-Roads, and when last seen near sunset was passing to the north-east under the east base of Buck Mountain in the direction of Salem and Rectortown. I am inclined to believe that this column is only covering the flank of the main body, which is moving toward Front Royal and Thornton's Gap, though of this I am not certain. I shall push a strong reconnoissance across the river at Waterloo bridge and Sulphur Springs early in the morning, to ascertain whether the main body of the enemy has really left, and if so, to push forward in their rear. There is certainly no force opposite Rappahannock Station. McDowell's is the only corps, that is at all reliable, that I have. Sigel, as you know, is perfectly unreliable, and I suggest that some officer of superior ra
Waterloo bridge (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 63
-Chief: The column of the enemy alluded to in my despatch of half-past 12 P. M. to-day, passed Gaines Gross-Roads, and when last seen near sunset was passing to the north-east under the east base of Buck Mountain in the direction of Salem and Rectortown. I am inclined to believe that this column is only covering the flank of the main body, which is moving toward Front Royal and Thornton's Gap, though of this I am not certain. I shall push a strong reconnoissance across the river at Waterloo bridge and Sulphur Springs early in the morning, to ascertain whether the main body of the enemy has really left, and if so, to push forward in their rear. There is certainly no force opposite Rappahannock Station. McDowell's is the only corps, that is at all reliable, that I have. Sigel, as you know, is perfectly unreliable, and I suggest that some officer of superior rank be sent to command his army corps. His conduct to-day has occasioned me great dissatisfaction. Banks's corps is ve
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 63
McClellan was urged to give me information of his intended movements, in order that, if he moved between the enemy and Washington reenforcements could be sent from this place. On the first of October, finding that he purposed to operate from Harper's Ferry, I urged him to cross the river at once and give battle to the enemy, pointing out to him the disadvantages of delaying till the autumn rains had swollen the Potomac and impaired the roads. On the sixth of October he was peremptorily ordered attention to this apparent neglect of his department. On the twenty-fifth, he reported as the result of his investigation, that forty-eight thousand pairs of boots and shoes had been received by the Quartermaster of Gen. McClellan's army at Harper's Ferry, Frederick, and Hagerstown; that twenty thousand pairs were at Harper's Ferry depot on the twenty-first; that ten thousand more were on their way, and fifteen thousand more ordered. Col. Ingals, Aid-de-Camp and Chief Quartermaster to Gen.
ts, push McDowell's crops and Kearny's division upon the enemy's rear. If I find my suspicions confirmed in the morning, I shall also put Reno across the river at Rappahannock Station, and direct him to move forward cautiously upon Culpeper. Banks's corps must be left somewhere in the rear, to be set up again. Sigel's corps, although composed of some of the best fighting material we have, will never do much service under that officer. I will communicate further with you in the morning. John Pope, Major-General. Exhibit no. 5. war Department--Washington City, October 27, 1862. General: It has been publicly stated that the army under Gen. McClellan has been unable to move during the fine weather of this fall for want of shoes, clothing, and other supplies. You will please report to this department upon the following points: 1. To whom and in what manner the requisitions for supplies to the army under General McClellan have been made since you assumed command as Gener
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