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Grenada (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 68
Doc. 63.-fight near Coffeeville, Miss. Chicago Tribune account. in camp north of the Taconapatafa, seventeen miles South of Oxford, Miss., December 6, 1862. when I penned my last letter, we were hotly pressing the rear of Gen. Van Dorn's retreating column, and fully expected to encamp to-day at Coffeeville. From here to Grenada is but eleven miles, and here we thought to spend the Sabbath. We did propose to capture Coffeeville, but just as the hand was outstretched which was to inclose them within its grasp, they managed to escape, and came near inclosing us within their grip. Not to put too fine a point upon it, they came very near capturing our whole command, and making a muss of the expedition. My narrative left us at Water Valley, with the following order of march for the morrow: Col. Mizener with the Third brigade in the advance; Col. Lee with the First brigade in the centre, and Col. Hatch with the Second brigade in the rear. This order was changed in the
Water Valley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 68
ing column, and fully expected to encamp to-day at Coffeeville. From here to Grenada is but eleven miles, and here we thought to spend the Sabbath. We did propose to capture Coffeeville, but just as the hand was outstretched which was to inclose them within its grasp, they managed to escape, and came near inclosing us within their grip. Not to put too fine a point upon it, they came very near capturing our whole command, and making a muss of the expedition. My narrative left us at Water Valley, with the following order of march for the morrow: Col. Mizener with the Third brigade in the advance; Col. Lee with the First brigade in the centre, and Col. Hatch with the Second brigade in the rear. This order was changed in the morning by Col. Mizener taking a road running parallel with the Coffeeville road, which brought him to the rear of Col. Lee's column when he reached it. The column was thus led by Colonel Lee. At seven o'clock Friday morning, the column started in the order
Coffeeville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 68
Doc. 63.-fight near Coffeeville, Miss. Chicago Tribune account. in camp north of the Taconapatafa, seventeen miles South of Oxford, Miss., December 6, 1862. when I penned my last letter, we were hotly pressing the rear of Gen. Van Dorn's retreating column, and fully expected to encamp to-day at Coffeeville. From here to Grenada is but eleven miles, and here we thought to spend the Sabbath. We did propose to capture Coffeeville, but just as the hand was outstretched which was Coffeeville, but just as the hand was outstretched which was to inclose them within its grasp, they managed to escape, and came near inclosing us within their grip. Not to put too fine a point upon it, they came very near capturing our whole command, and making a muss of the expedition. My narrative left nd brigade in the rear. This order was changed in the morning by Col. Mizener taking a road running parallel with the Coffeeville road, which brought him to the rear of Col. Lee's column when he reached it. The column was thus led by Colonel Lee.
Oxford (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 68
Doc. 63.-fight near Coffeeville, Miss. Chicago Tribune account. in camp north of the Taconapatafa, seventeen miles South of Oxford, Miss., December 6, 1862. when I penned my last letter, we were hotly pressing the rear of Gen. Van Dorn's retreating column, and fully expected to encamp to-day at Coffeeville. From here to Grenada is but eleven miles, and here we thought to spend the Sabbath. We did propose to capture Coffeeville, but just as the hand was outstretched which was to inclose them within its grasp, they managed to escape, and came near inclosing us within their grip. Not to put too fine a point upon it, they came very near capturing our whole command, and making a muss of the expedition. My narrative left us at Water Valley, with the following order of march for the morrow: Col. Mizener with the Third brigade in the advance; Col. Lee with the First brigade in the centre, and Col. Hatch with the Second brigade in the rear. This order was changed in the
r battery admirably. The retrograde movement. At once Colonels Dickey and Lee discovered that the position was untenable, and that a force far different in character and strength from any they had anticipated was attacking us, and that a retrograde movement must be executed and speedily. Flanking parties and skirmishers were at once called in and sent back, and slowly the gun with its support of dismounted rifles moved backward. Two squadrons of the Fourth Illinois cavalry, under Capt. Townsend, were left in front to delay the advance of the army. Hardly had our gun crossed the valley and reached the position from which we had first fired, when our advance and protecting squadrons followed us, driven before the enemy's infantry, who were charging forward with cheers and yells. On our right advanced two regiments of rebel infantry with their colors; on our centre another, while two more regiments were marching in column toward our left flank, endeavoring to attack that exp
Jerome Coon (search for this): chapter 68
se orders could be executed, fresh troops were brought against them. The great danger was from flanking movements, which the enemy's great numbers allowed him easily to make, and a hasty retreat was ordered. So went the battle for two long hours. Up and down the wooded hills till night fell, and the moon shone out bright and clear to light the work of death, continued the struggle. Officers and men did nobly. Colonels Dickey, Lee, and Mizener, Lieut.-Colonels Prince and McCullough, Majors Coon, Love, and Rickards, and those under them, were everywhere exposed to the most galling fire, and personally directed the movements of their commands. One of Col. Lee's best officers was killed, and five of Col. Hatch's were wounded. Lieut.-Col. McCullough, of the Fourth Illinois cavalry, fell bravely at the head of his column, shot in the breast. He is doubtless dead, or, if alive, a prisoner. Col. Hatch's horse was killed under him, and Colonel Lee's disabled by a Minie bullet. At
ar capturing our whole command, and making a muss of the expedition. My narrative left us at Water Valley, with the following order of march for the morrow: Col. Mizener with the Third brigade in the advance; Col. Lee with the First brigade in the centre, and Col. Hatch with the Second brigade in the rear. This order was changed in the morning by Col. Mizener taking a road running parallel with the Coffeeville road, which brought him to the rear of Col. Lee's column when he reached it. The column was thus led by Colonel Lee. At seven o'clock Friday morning, the column started in the order indicated above. At a proper distance from the river, a largll night fell, and the moon shone out bright and clear to light the work of death, continued the struggle. Officers and men did nobly. Colonels Dickey, Lee, and Mizener, Lieut.-Colonels Prince and McCullough, Majors Coon, Love, and Rickards, and those under them, were everywhere exposed to the most galling fire, and personally di
McCullough (search for this): chapter 68
o long hours. Up and down the wooded hills till night fell, and the moon shone out bright and clear to light the work of death, continued the struggle. Officers and men did nobly. Colonels Dickey, Lee, and Mizener, Lieut.-Colonels Prince and McCullough, Majors Coon, Love, and Rickards, and those under them, were everywhere exposed to the most galling fire, and personally directed the movements of their commands. One of Col. Lee's best officers was killed, and five of Col. Hatch's were wounded. Lieut.-Col. McCullough, of the Fourth Illinois cavalry, fell bravely at the head of his column, shot in the breast. He is doubtless dead, or, if alive, a prisoner. Col. Hatch's horse was killed under him, and Colonel Lee's disabled by a Minie bullet. At length, having continued this expensive pursuit for three miles, the enemy desisted and drew off his forces. Our column formed again and again, but backward we passed over the road of the morning, having by the sacrifice of precious blo
could be executed, fresh troops were brought against them. The great danger was from flanking movements, which the enemy's great numbers allowed him easily to make, and a hasty retreat was ordered. So went the battle for two long hours. Up and down the wooded hills till night fell, and the moon shone out bright and clear to light the work of death, continued the struggle. Officers and men did nobly. Colonels Dickey, Lee, and Mizener, Lieut.-Colonels Prince and McCullough, Majors Coon, Love, and Rickards, and those under them, were everywhere exposed to the most galling fire, and personally directed the movements of their commands. One of Col. Lee's best officers was killed, and five of Col. Hatch's were wounded. Lieut.-Col. McCullough, of the Fourth Illinois cavalry, fell bravely at the head of his column, shot in the breast. He is doubtless dead, or, if alive, a prisoner. Col. Hatch's horse was killed under him, and Colonel Lee's disabled by a Minie bullet. At length, h
Fitz-Hugh Lee (search for this): chapter 68
ol. Mizener with the Third brigade in the advance; Col. Lee with the First brigade in the centre, and Col. HatCoffeeville road, which brought him to the rear of Col. Lee's column when he reached it. The column was thus led by Colonel Lee. At seven o'clock Friday morning, the column started in the order indicated above. At a pbecame heavy, and the enemy holding their ground, Colonel Lee brought forward a ten-pounder James rifled gun, ae retrograde movement. At once Colonels Dickey and Lee discovered that the position was untenable, and that were within four rods of the mouth of our cannon Colonel Lee ordered the piece limbered up and moved to the reuggle. Officers and men did nobly. Colonels Dickey, Lee, and Mizener, Lieut.-Colonels Prince and McCullough, directed the movements of their commands. One of Col. Lee's best officers was killed, and five of Col. Hatcher. Col. Hatch's horse was killed under him, and Colonel Lee's disabled by a Minie bullet. At length, having
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