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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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The force of the enemy could not have been much less than four thousand men, composed of the two regiments of infantry already named, three full regiments and two battalions of cavalry, and twelve pieces of artillery. The cavalry was mostly made up of Tennessee and Kentucky men, with the exception of three companies of Texan Rangers under the command of Col. Gano. The three cavalry regiments were commanded respectively by Cols. Duke, Chenault, and Bennett, and the other battalion by Major Stoner. The two infantry regiments were commanded by the infamous Kentucky traitor, Roger W. Hanson, and the artillery was partly attached to his brigade, partly to the cavalry, and partly independent. The entire force was commanded by Brigadier-General John Morgan. As soon as possible after the surrender, the rebels collected their prisoners together, and commenced plundering our camps. The prisoners were then taken across the river; but before the booty was all over, General Dumont's for
Roger W. Hanson (search for this): chapter 70
the two regiments of infantry already named, three full regiments and two battalions of cavalry, and twelve pieces of artillery. The cavalry was mostly made up of Tennessee and Kentucky men, with the exception of three companies of Texan Rangers under the command of Col. Gano. The three cavalry regiments were commanded respectively by Cols. Duke, Chenault, and Bennett, and the other battalion by Major Stoner. The two infantry regiments were commanded by the infamous Kentucky traitor, Roger W. Hanson, and the artillery was partly attached to his brigade, partly to the cavalry, and partly independent. The entire force was commanded by Brigadier-General John Morgan. As soon as possible after the surrender, the rebels collected their prisoners together, and commenced plundering our camps. The prisoners were then taken across the river; but before the booty was all over, General Dumont's forces appeared upon the right bank, retook a part of the prey, and sent some shells after the
December 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 70
ng a portion of them took their way to the States, and the remainder departed yesterday morning. The loss of the enemy, including some prisoners taken by Gen. Dumont's forces upon the right bank of the river, was about three hundred men. Considering the casualties in the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois as equalling those in the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio, our own loss in killed, wounded and missing was about one hundred and fifty. Y. S. Letter from General Dumont. Gallatin, December 12, 1862. To the Editors of the Louisville Journal: gentlemen: In your daily issue of the tenth instant you speak in terms of severity of the recent surrender of troops at Hartsville, and make it the occasion of an assault upon me. Unconscious of ever having injured you or merited such treatment, I cannot in justice to myself and truth suffer such charges to go unnoticed; but in repelling them will endeavor to be as brief as the nature of what you have said and the facts will allow. After n
December 14th (search for this): chapter 70
Doc. 65.-battle at Hartsville, Tenn. Cincinnati Gazette account. Nashville, Tenn., December 14. in a letter dated the eighth instant, I gave you such imperfect accounts of the affair at Hartsville, as had then come to hand, mentally resolving that I would write no more about it until I should be in possession of a sufficient number of facts to furnish a clear and reliable statement. Since that time, the paroled prisoners have arrived from Murfreesboro; minute accounts of the disaster have been presented by members of all the Union regiments concerned. At Hartsville, the Cumberland River, which runs north-west from Rome in Smith County, makes a not very abrupt curve, and for a few miles pursues a course almost due south. Two little streams enter the river at the bend, and between these lies the town of Hartsville, about a mile from the river-bank. Leaving the town and approaching the river, you enter tolerably heavy woods; after which you come to some old fields aba
December 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 70
story that firing was heard at my camp, and that I was thus notified that the little band was in distress, and failed to go to its relief, is known to have no shadow of truth in it, by Cols. Owen, King, Miller, and O'Brien, of the infantry, Captains Nicklin and Lilly, of the artillery, and by all the officers and men of my command. I appeal to them to relieve me of the imputation, and by their testimony I am willing to abide. E. Dumont. Chicago Tribune account. Columbus, Ohio, Dec. 16, 1862. The One Hundred and Fourth regiment Illinois volunteers arrived at Columbus, Ohio, this morning, and are now quartered in Camp Chase. I have heard their account of the Hartsville affair, and am sure many of your readers would like to see a narrative in which they are all agreed, and which I doubt is wholly reliable. The camp at Hartsville was more than a mile from the town, and upon the bank of the Cumberland, on ground which, according to the statement of the Adjutant of the One
The loss of the enemy, including some prisoners taken by Gen. Dumont's forces upon the right bank of the river, was about three hundred men. Considering the casualties in the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois as equalling those in the One Hundred and Sixth Ohio, our own loss in killed, wounded and missing was about one hundred and fifty. Y. S. Letter from General Dumont. Gallatin, December 12, 1862. To the Editors of the Louisville Journal: gentlemen: In your daily issue of the tenth instant you speak in terms of severity of the recent surrender of troops at Hartsville, and make it the occasion of an assault upon me. Unconscious of ever having injured you or merited such treatment, I cannot in justice to myself and truth suffer such charges to go unnoticed; but in repelling them will endeavor to be as brief as the nature of what you have said and the facts will allow. After noticing the surrender, you say: We are not sure that any thing better was to be expected from
Doc. 65.-battle at Hartsville, Tenn. Cincinnati Gazette account. Nashville, Tenn., December 14. in a letter dated the eighth instant, I gave you such imperfect accounts of the affair at Hartsville, as had then come to hand, mentally resolving that I would write no more about it until I should be in possession of a sufficient number of facts to furnish a clear and reliable statement. Since that time, the paroled prisoners have arrived from Murfreesboro; minute accounts of the disaster have been presented by members of all the Union regiments concerned. At Hartsville, the Cumberland River, which runs north-west from Rome in Smith County, makes a not very abrupt curve, and for a few miles pursues a course almost due south. Two little streams enter the river at the bend, and between these lies the town of Hartsville, about a mile from the river-bank. Leaving the town and approaching the river, you enter tolerably heavy woods; after which you come to some old fields aban
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