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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
rts to flank and cut off his force; but this dashing officer was too wary for them, and succeeded in returning with four hundred head of captured horses and mules, laden with spoils taken from the enemy. The people of Tennessee are represented as having been almost frantic with joy at the appearance of our forces once more upon their borders. They fed our soldiers with a bountiful hand, and wept for joy. Thank God you have come at last! one and all exclaimed. Their hospitality was not a little surprising to our soldiers, who have been so uniformly swindled and extorted from in Mississippi. The people of Tennessee had been induced to believe that General Grant's headquarters were at Jackson, Miss., and that our whole army had been captured. Judge, then, of their surprise, when they were visited by Van Dorn's command. The entire number of prisoners captured and paroled during the raid is two thousand one hundred privates, and one hundred and seventy-five commissioned officers.
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 87
e within eight miles of Holly Springs in the evening, where he bivouacked his force until two hours before day, when he moved cautiously into town, leaving the Texas brigade upon the heights outside as a reserve. As our forces dashed in from all sides, the entrance proved a complete surprise, the breaking streaks of daylight showing the Yankee tents with their yet undisturbed slumberers. A charge was ordered upon them, and the torch applied to the canvas which covered them. To paraphrase Belgium's picture: Ah! then and there was hurrying to and fro, And running in hot haste, And cheeks all pale and blanched with woe, Exhibiting Yankee cowardice. The rapidity with which the tents of the enemy were vacated was marvellous; and, impelled by burning torches and rapid discharges of sidearms, the Yankees took no time to prepare their toilets, but rushed out into the cool atmosphere of a December morning, clothed very similarly to Joseph when the lady Potiphar attempted to detain
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
orn, and made great efforts to flank and cut off his force; but this dashing officer was too wary for them, and succeeded in returning with four hundred head of captured horses and mules, laden with spoils taken from the enemy. The people of Tennessee are represented as having been almost frantic with joy at the appearance of our forces once more upon their borders. They fed our soldiers with a bountiful hand, and wept for joy. Thank God you have come at last! one and all exclaimed. Their hospitality was not a little surprising to our soldiers, who have been so uniformly swindled and extorted from in Mississippi. The people of Tennessee had been induced to believe that General Grant's headquarters were at Jackson, Miss., and that our whole army had been captured. Judge, then, of their surprise, when they were visited by Van Dorn's command. The entire number of prisoners captured and paroled during the raid is two thousand one hundred privates, and one hundred and seventy-f
Bolivar (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
f the railroad battery, cut the track to prevent its escape, and capture it. I believe he succeeded in cutting the road, but our forces were compelled to withdraw, and the steam battery was not taken. The force then pushed on to Middleburgh and Bolivar, and attacked both places, but found them too strongly defended and garrisoned to succeed in taking either of the points. When the command turned back after its unsuccessful attack upon Bolivar the enemy sent a force of ten thousand, comprisiBolivar the enemy sent a force of ten thousand, comprising the three branches of the service, out after Van Dorn, and made great efforts to flank and cut off his force; but this dashing officer was too wary for them, and succeeded in returning with four hundred head of captured horses and mules, laden with spoils taken from the enemy. The people of Tennessee are represented as having been almost frantic with joy at the appearance of our forces once more upon their borders. They fed our soldiers with a bountiful hand, and wept for joy. Thank God
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
ts to flank and cut off his force; but this dashing officer was too wary for them, and succeeded in returning with four hundred head of captured horses and mules, laden with spoils taken from the enemy. The people of Tennessee are represented as having been almost frantic with joy at the appearance of our forces once more upon their borders. They fed our soldiers with a bountiful hand, and wept for joy. Thank God you have come at last! one and all exclaimed. Their hospitality was not a little surprising to our soldiers, who have been so uniformly swindled and extorted from in Mississippi. The people of Tennessee had been induced to believe that General Grant's headquarters were at Jackson, Miss., and that our whole army had been captured. Judge, then, of their surprise, when they were visited by Van Dorn's command. The entire number of prisoners captured and paroled during the raid is two thousand one hundred privates, and one hundred and seventy-five commissioned officers.
Holly Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
or ubiquitous Morgan. A correspondent of the Mobile Register gives the following interesting particulars of his brilliant achievements in the vicinity of Holly Springs, Miss.: Van Dorn took a by-way and meandering route through the swamp, and came within eight miles of Holly Springs in the evening, where he bivouacked his forHolly Springs in the evening, where he bivouacked his force until two hours before day, when he moved cautiously into town, leaving the Texas brigade upon the heights outside as a reserve. As our forces dashed in from all sides, the entrance proved a complete surprise, the breaking streaks of daylight showing the Yankee tents with their yet undisturbed slumberers. A charge was ordered the noble woman insisted that he was there, concealed; and finally, after much ado, the gallant (save the mark!) Col. Murphy, the intrepid Yankee commandant of Holly Springs, was pulled out from under his bed, and presented himself in his nocturnal habiliments to his captors. The provost-marshal was also taken, and, addressing
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 87
us fairly this time. I knowed it. I was in my bed with my wife when I heard the firing, and I at once said: Well, wife, it's no use closing our eyes or hiding under the clothes, we've gone up. Our attention was given to Grant's headquarters, which he had left twenty-four hours before. All his papers, charts, maps, etc., were captured, together with his splendid carriage, which was burned. Among his papers was found a pass, to pass the bearer over all railroads and steamboats in the United States, at Government expense; to pass all pickets and guards, and other papers, at once interesting and valuable. Mrs. Grant was also captured, but no indignity was offered her. Nearly every store on the public square was filled with sutler stores, and after our men had helped themselves, the balance of the goods were burned. When our forces first reached the depot, there was a train about leaving. The engineer jumped off and ran away, and one of our men took his place, shut the thrott
Middleburgh (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 87
as particularly conspicuous, attempted to lead them to the attack, but the men refused to follow, believing the way impassable and the position too strong for cavalry demonstration alone. Col. McCullough of the Mississippi cavalry was ordered to get in the rear of the railroad battery, cut the track to prevent its escape, and capture it. I believe he succeeded in cutting the road, but our forces were compelled to withdraw, and the steam battery was not taken. The force then pushed on to Middleburgh and Bolivar, and attacked both places, but found them too strongly defended and garrisoned to succeed in taking either of the points. When the command turned back after its unsuccessful attack upon Bolivar the enemy sent a force of ten thousand, comprising the three branches of the service, out after Van Dorn, and made great efforts to flank and cut off his force; but this dashing officer was too wary for them, and succeeded in returning with four hundred head of captured horses and mu
ly to Joseph when the lady Potiphar attempted to detain him. The scene was wild, exciting, tumultuous. Yankees running, tents burning, torches flaming, confederates shouting, guns popping, sabres clanking, Abolitionists begging for mercy, rebels shouting exultingly, women en dishabille clapping their hands, frantic with joy, crying, Kill them! Kill them! --a heterogeneous mass of excited, frantic, frightened human beings — presented an indescribable picture, more adapted for the pencil of Hogarth than the pen of a newspaper correspondent. The surprised camp surrendered one thousand eight hundred men and one hundred and fifty commissioned officers, who were immediately paroled. And then commenced the work of destruction. The extensive buildings of the Mississippi Central depot — the station-house, the engine house, and immense store-houses — were filled with supplies of clothing and commissary stores. Outside of the depot the barrels of flour were estimated to be half a mile in<
J. J. Murphy (search for this): chapter 87
nsiderable loss to the Abolitionists, and a loss of thirty in killed and wounded on our part. The ladies rushed out from the houses, wild with joy, crying out: There's some at the Fair Grounds, chase them, kill them, for God's sake. One lady said that the Federal commandant of the post is in my house; come and catch him; and a search was instituted but without success, when the noble woman insisted that he was there, concealed; and finally, after much ado, the gallant (save the mark!) Col. Murphy, the intrepid Yankee commandant of Holly Springs, was pulled out from under his bed, and presented himself in his nocturnal habiliments to his captors. The provost-marshal was also taken, and, addressing Gen. Van Dorn, said: Well, General, you've got us fairly this time. I knowed it. I was in my bed with my wife when I heard the firing, and I at once said: Well, wife, it's no use closing our eyes or hiding under the clothes, we've gone up. Our attention was given to Grant's headqu
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