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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
land. Epode. O bleeding land! there is, that bringeth cheer; Renew thy fading hopes, repress thy sighs. O traitor band! there is, that causeth fear; Haste ye and hide, ere Nemesis arise! O mourning heart, be still! The gloomy night, Even to eye that's not “of faith,” grows gray; Soon shall its darkness melt away in light. Come, quickly come, light of the glorious day! Arise, and gird your loins, ye men of might! Earth trembling, hope, heaven, bide the end; hear ye! Go forth, great-hearts! Do battle for the right! Go forth, and faint not: “God and Liberty!” “Thine is the fight, O God.” For liberty To worship thee in peace, we draw the sword; Thy cause shall fail not, save ordained by thee; Even as the sparrow falls but by thy word. Grant thou, All-Merciful! thy mercy to us, Only thine arm of strength can us subdue. With thine own spirit toward our foes, imbue us; So shall we “temper justice” to thy view. Edmundus Scotus, Ninth Illinois Cavalry Chicago, Nove
Tully (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
ng in a field by the roadside: both animals were taken, and the plough left standing in the furrow.--Tribune Correspondence. Threnody. Strophe First: The plough stands in the furrow. Ah! how long? The unbroken sod invites the share in vain, The fertile fields produce not: and among The woods resounds the tramp of armed men. Ceres aye yields to Mars. The warrior-god Over her fields relentless drives his steeds; And when and where he hurls his barbed rod, “Some Athens perishes, some Tully bleeds.” Strophe Second: The plough stood in the furrow. Putnam heard His country's trumpet-call, and left it there. In her behalf, the soul within him stirred To such deeds as few mortals do, or dare. Antistrophe: The plough stands in the furrow. Where is he Who lately guided it with wonted skill? Go, seek him in the camp where traitors be, Armed 'gainst the land which calls them “brothers” still. Strophe Third: The song of birds amid the summer trees, The forest foliage, glittering
Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 104
29. a song of Lamentation. On hearing of the battle of Lexington, Col. Putnam left his plough standing in the middle of the field, and, without changing his clothes, repaired to Cambridge, riding in a single day one hundred miles.--National Portrait Gallery, published 1834. A little beyond, a rebel was ploughing in a field by the roadside: both animals were taken, and the plough left standing in the furrow.--Tribune Correspondence. Threnody. Strophe First: The plough stands in the furrow. Ah! how long? The unbroken sod invites the share in vain, The fertile fields produce not: and among The woods resounds the tramp of armed men. Ceres aye yields to Mars. The warrior-god Over her fields relentless drives his steeds; And when and where he hurls his barbed rod, “Some Athens perishes, some Tully bleeds.” Strophe Second: The plough stood in the furrow. Putnam heard His country's trumpet-call, and left it there. In her behalf, the soul within him stirred To such de
29. a song of Lamentation. On hearing of the battle of Lexington, Col. Putnam left his plough standing in the middle of the field, and, without changing his clothes, repaired to Cambridge, riding in a single day one hundred miles.--National Portrait Gallery, published 1834. A little beyond, a rebel was ploughing in a field by the roadside: both animals were taken, and the plough left standing in the furrow.--Tribune Correspondence. Threnody. Strophe First: The plough stands iamp of armed men. Ceres aye yields to Mars. The warrior-god Over her fields relentless drives his steeds; And when and where he hurls his barbed rod, “Some Athens perishes, some Tully bleeds.” Strophe Second: The plough stood in the furrow. Putnam heard His country's trumpet-call, and left it there. In her behalf, the soul within him stirred To such deeds as few mortals do, or dare. Antistrophe: The plough stands in the furrow. Where is he Who lately guided it with wonted skill? Go, seek
his clothes, repaired to Cambridge, riding in a single day one hundred miles.--National Portrait Gallery, published 1834. A little beyond, a rebel was ploughing in a field by the roadside: both animals were taken, and the plough left standing in the furrow.--Tribune Correspondence. Threnody. Strophe First: The plough stands in the furrow. Ah! how long? The unbroken sod invites the share in vain, The fertile fields produce not: and among The woods resounds the tramp of armed men. Ceres aye yields to Mars. The warrior-god Over her fields relentless drives his steeds; And when and where he hurls his barbed rod, “Some Athens perishes, some Tully bleeds.” Strophe Second: The plough stood in the furrow. Putnam heard His country's trumpet-call, and left it there. In her behalf, the soul within him stirred To such deeds as few mortals do, or dare. Antistrophe: The plough stands in the furrow. Where is he Who lately guided it with wonted skill? Go, seek him in the camp wher
The forest foliage, glittering goldenly, The azure sky, the many-perfumed breeze, Ah! sunny clime! fond Nature smiles on thee. Antistrophe: The sound of mourning! dear homes ruthlessly Laid waste! for Death and Hell walk hand in hand! Sackcloth and Ashes! Bend the stubborn knee-- Woe is thy heritage, thou goodly land. Epode. O bleeding land! there is, that bringeth cheer; Renew thy fading hopes, repress thy sighs. O traitor band! there is, that causeth fear; Haste ye and hide, ere Nemesis arise! O mourning heart, be still! The gloomy night, Even to eye that's not “of faith,” grows gray; Soon shall its darkness melt away in light. Come, quickly come, light of the glorious day! Arise, and gird your loins, ye men of might! Earth trembling, hope, heaven, bide the end; hear ye! Go forth, great-hearts! Do battle for the right! Go forth, and faint not: “God and Liberty!” “Thine is the fight, O God.” For liberty To worship thee in peace, we draw the sword; Thy cause shal
red to Cambridge, riding in a single day one hundred miles.--National Portrait Gallery, published 1834. A little beyond, a rebel was ploughing in a field by the roadside: both animals were taken, and the plough left standing in the furrow.--Tribune Correspondence. Threnody. Strophe First: The plough stands in the furrow. Ah! how long? The unbroken sod invites the share in vain, The fertile fields produce not: and among The woods resounds the tramp of armed men. Ceres aye yields to Mars. The warrior-god Over her fields relentless drives his steeds; And when and where he hurls his barbed rod, “Some Athens perishes, some Tully bleeds.” Strophe Second: The plough stood in the furrow. Putnam heard His country's trumpet-call, and left it there. In her behalf, the soul within him stirred To such deeds as few mortals do, or dare. Antistrophe: The plough stands in the furrow. Where is he Who lately guided it with wonted skill? Go, seek him in the camp where traitors be, Armed
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 104
land. Epode. O bleeding land! there is, that bringeth cheer; Renew thy fading hopes, repress thy sighs. O traitor band! there is, that causeth fear; Haste ye and hide, ere Nemesis arise! O mourning heart, be still! The gloomy night, Even to eye that's not “of faith,” grows gray; Soon shall its darkness melt away in light. Come, quickly come, light of the glorious day! Arise, and gird your loins, ye men of might! Earth trembling, hope, heaven, bide the end; hear ye! Go forth, great-hearts! Do battle for the right! Go forth, and faint not: “God and Liberty!” “Thine is the fight, O God.” For liberty To worship thee in peace, we draw the sword; Thy cause shall fail not, save ordained by thee; Even as the sparrow falls but by thy word. Grant thou, All-Merciful! thy mercy to us, Only thine arm of strength can us subdue. With thine own spirit toward our foes, imbue us; So shall we “temper justice” to thy view. Edmundus Scotus, Ninth Illinois Cavalry Chicago, Nove
Edmundus Scotus (search for this): chapter 104
land. Epode. O bleeding land! there is, that bringeth cheer; Renew thy fading hopes, repress thy sighs. O traitor band! there is, that causeth fear; Haste ye and hide, ere Nemesis arise! O mourning heart, be still! The gloomy night, Even to eye that's not “of faith,” grows gray; Soon shall its darkness melt away in light. Come, quickly come, light of the glorious day! Arise, and gird your loins, ye men of might! Earth trembling, hope, heaven, bide the end; hear ye! Go forth, great-hearts! Do battle for the right! Go forth, and faint not: “God and Liberty!” “Thine is the fight, O God.” For liberty To worship thee in peace, we draw the sword; Thy cause shall fail not, save ordained by thee; Even as the sparrow falls but by thy word. Grant thou, All-Merciful! thy mercy to us, Only thine arm of strength can us subdue. With thine own spirit toward our foes, imbue us; So shall we “temper justice” to thy view. Edmundus Scotus, Ninth Illinois Cavalry Chicago, Nove
29. a song of Lamentation. On hearing of the battle of Lexington, Col. Putnam left his plough standing in the middle of the field, and, without changing his clothes, repaired to Cambridge, riding in a single day one hundred miles.--National Portrait Gallery, published 1834. A little beyond, a rebel was ploughing in a field by the roadside: both animals were taken, and the plough left standing in the furrow.--Tribune Correspondence. Threnody. Strophe First: The plough stands in the furrow. Ah! how long? The unbroken sod invites the share in vain, The fertile fields produce not: and among The woods resounds the tramp of armed men. Ceres aye yields to Mars. The warrior-god Over her fields relentless drives his steeds; And when and where he hurls his barbed rod, “Some Athens perishes, some Tully bleeds.” Strophe Second: The plough stood in the furrow. Putnam heard His country's trumpet-call, and left it there. In her behalf, the soul within him stirred To such dee
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