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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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T. R. R. Cobb (search for this): chapter 167
Nationals Frightened by A Rooster.--One of the soldiers of General T. R. R. Cobb's brigade has a game-cock, which he had with him on the day of the battle of Fredericksburgh. By a trick, or signal, which they had taught him, the soldiers could make the cock crow whenever they chose. Upon each advance of the enemy, just before our sharp-shooters opened upon them, the cock's clear, shrill clarion rung out on the sulphurous air. This strange defiance, while it cheered and amused our boys, fell with a depressing effect upon the ears of the enemy. When the foe retired to return no more, the cock, with repeated crows, sounded the victory.--Savannah Republican, January 8.
January 8th (search for this): chapter 167
Nationals Frightened by A Rooster.--One of the soldiers of General T. R. R. Cobb's brigade has a game-cock, which he had with him on the day of the battle of Fredericksburgh. By a trick, or signal, which they had taught him, the soldiers could make the cock crow whenever they chose. Upon each advance of the enemy, just before our sharp-shooters opened upon them, the cock's clear, shrill clarion rung out on the sulphurous air. This strange defiance, while it cheered and amused our boys, fell with a depressing effect upon the ears of the enemy. When the foe retired to return no more, the cock, with repeated crows, sounded the victory.--Savannah Republican, January 8.