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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the flight of the Governor of Arkansas into Mississippi. A graphic picture in Frank Leslie's represents Beauregard watering his horse in hell. It was engraved after one of the numerous Federal reports of the death of our hero.--Charleston Courier, Ju
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the flight of the Governor of Arkansas into Mississippi. A graphic picture in Frank Leslie's represents Beauregard watering his horse in hell. It was engraved after one of the numerous Federal reports of the death of our hero.--Charleston Courier, Ju
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Charleston, S. C. July 15.--On Wednesday last the pickets of the Eutaw Battalion entered Legare's, the enemy having — to use their own expressive term--skedaddled the day previous. The first feature meeting the eyes of the advancing confederates was a number of mock sentinels stationed at intervals along the road. The dummies were neatly manufactured out of old clothes, and, with the addition of damaged gun-stocks, looked quite the martial Yankee. They were doubtless posted on the road wnter season in your noble city near Sumter. The following lines of doggerel were scribbled on one of the walls. The runaway writer has some fun in him, and we can almost forgive the hasty manner in which he left our shores without visiting Charleston: twenty-Eighth of June--good-Bye. air--Mary Blane. Oh! farewell, Carolinians, We are going far away; Don't cry — we'll soon be back, Another game to play. Chorus — Oh! farewell! oh! farewell! Our parting's full of pain; But do take <
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the flight of the Governor of Arkansas into Mississippi. A graphic picture in Frank Leslie's represents Beauregard watering his horse in hell. It was engraved after one of the numerous Federal reports of the death of our hero.--Charleston Courier, Ju
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 40
ll to school. When last you saw a silver dime, The truth it must be said; To search your empty pockets, boys, They'll answer “nary red.” We've tried to eat your beef, boys, It was too tough and dry-- It matched your biscuits made of corn, Your coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the fligh
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the flight of the Governor of Arkansas into Mississippi. A graphic picture in Frank Leslie's represents Beauregard watering his horse in hell. It was engraved after one of the numerous Federal reports of the death of our hero.--Charleston Courier, Ju
Mary Blane (search for this): chapter 40
e summer, we, the army of liberty, have concluded to withdraw from your marshes, and leave you to enjoy, as best you can, until weather sets in next fall, when we shall return and spend the winter season in your noble city near Sumter. The following lines of doggerel were scribbled on one of the walls. The runaway writer has some fun in him, and we can almost forgive the hasty manner in which he left our shores without visiting Charleston: twenty-Eighth of June--good-Bye. air--Mary Blane. Oh! farewell, Carolinians, We are going far away; Don't cry — we'll soon be back, Another game to play. Chorus — Oh! farewell! oh! farewell! Our parting's full of pain; But do take care yourselves, my dears, We are coming back again. Your swampy land's too hot for us, We are going off to cool; But never mind, our Monitor Will put you all to school. When last you saw a silver dime, The truth it must be said; To search your empty pockets, boys, They'll answer “nary red.” We've trie
Johnny Bull (search for this): chapter 40
ing back again. Your swampy land's too hot for us, We are going off to cool; But never mind, our Monitor Will put you all to school. When last you saw a silver dime, The truth it must be said; To search your empty pockets, boys, They'll answer “nary red.” We've tried to eat your beef, boys, It was too tough and dry-- It matched your biscuits made of corn, Your coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-char
Beauregard (search for this): chapter 40
coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the flight of the Governor of Arkansas into Mississippi. A graphic picture in Frank Leslie's represents Beauregard watering his horse in hell. It was engraved after one of the numerous Federal reports of the death of our hero.--Charleston Courier, Ju
Frank Leslie (search for this): chapter 40
coffee made of rye. What think you of Jeff Davis now-- Now wasn't he a fool To stuff his ears with Cotton, boys, And trust to Johnny Bull? You thought the French would help you, But that, too, was “no go;” “Nap” has other fish to fry, Way down in Mexico. Oh! when we meet again, my boys, There'll be a pretty muss; Don't cry, you've not seen the last Of our green fag and us. The Yankee newspapers captured are not of very late date, and it would be useless, therefore, to make extracts from them. They are redolent with magnificent Federal victories, in every one of which there are accounts of splendid bayonet-charges upon the rebels. The Boston Herald of June second announces the capture of Vicksburgh and Little Rock, and the flight of the Governor of Arkansas into Mississippi. A graphic picture in Frank Leslie's represents Beauregard watering his horse in hell. It was engraved after one of the numerous Federal reports of the death of our hero.--Charleston Courier, Ju
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