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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. nd counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the
Gordon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the troops, both cavalry and infantry, was highly commended by the general officers present. On my arrival at Gordon, I directed General Blair to send forward the First Alabama cavalry and General G. A. Smith's division some eight or ten miles toward the Oconee bridge, which he did; with instructions to move forward to-day, and, if possible, to secure that bridge, and plank it over for infantry to cros
Irwinton (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. Quite a little action grew out of it, in which there was charging and counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four
F. P. Blair (search for this): chapter 7
had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the troops, both cavalry and infantry, was highly commended by the general officers present. On my arrival at Gordon, I directed General Blair to send forward the First Alabama cavalry and General G. A. Smith's division some eight or ten miles toward the Oconee bridge, which he did; with instructions to move forward to-day, and, if possible, to secure that bridge, and plank it over for infantry to cros
J. B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 7
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. Quite a little action grew out of it, in which there was charging and counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four
T. J. Woods (search for this): chapter 7
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. y-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the troops, both cavalry
Giles A. Smith (search for this): chapter 7
had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the troops, both cavalry and infantry, was highly commended by the general officers present. On my arrival at Gordon, I directed General Blair to send forward the First Alabama cavalry and General G. A. Smith's division some eight or ten miles toward the Oconee bridge, which he did; with instructions to move forward to-day, and, if possible, to secure that bridge, and plank it over for infantry to cros
C. C. Walcott (search for this): chapter 7
on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in f counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artmet in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the tro
P. J. Osterhaus (search for this): chapter 7
iles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four guns. The assault was made with great vigor, but was met in the usual manner, and completely repulsed. The action continued for some three hours. Walcott was assisted by a regiment of cavalry on either flank. General Woods was present during the action, and General Osterhaus part of the time. I regret to say that General Walcott--than whom there is not a braver or better officer — was wounded; but I hope not seriously. The conduct of the troops, both cavalry and infantry, was highly commended by the general officers present. On my arrival at Gordon, I directed General Blair to send forward the First Alabama cavalry and General G. A. Smith's division some eight or ten miles toward the Oconee bridge, which he did; with instructions to move forward to-da
November 22nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 7
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. Quite a little action grew out of it, in which there was charging and counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of fou