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I endeavored as much as possible to accelerate their movements. The enemy offered no opposition to their march on the sixth. On the seventh the advance drove a small force to Pleasant Hill, and from there to Wilson's farm, three miles beyond, wunboat Covington, having in convoy the transport Warner, accompanied the Signal. We received news, on the morning of the sixth, of the destruction of the gunboats and the transport. The enemy had established a battery near Marksville, supported byal Ransom, and the division of the Nineteenth corps under Brigadier-General Emory, left Natchitoches on Wednesday, the sixth inst., in the order in which they are mentioned. A part of the cavalry had already encamped some ten miles out, and the remrd Mansfield: after an obstinate skirmish, Colonel Clarke, an Aid-de-camp of the commanding General, joined me on the sixth instant, and visited General Lee on the seventh. General Ransom's command arrived at Pleasant Hill about two o'clock P. M.
s, from Grand Ecore, until the morning of the seventh, and then rode rapidly forward, reaching the Hill. A very heavy rain fell all day on the seventh, which greatly impeded the movement of the reposition to their march on the sixth. On the seventh the advance drove a small force to Pleasant H. The fleet sailed from Grand Ecore on the seventh, and reached its destination at Loggy Bayou otates that the fleet made twenty miles on the seventh, fifty-seven miles on the eighth, eighteen miompanied by severe skirmishing. On the seventh instant, General Lee drove the enemy through Pleasixth instant, and visited General Lee on the seventh. General Ransom's command arrived at Pleasant Hill about two o'clock P. M. on the seventh, and General Emory's about five P. M. A heavy rain eighth instant. On the evening of the seventh instant, I was informed by Colonel Clarke, that G arrived at my camp on the evening of the seventh instant. At eleven o'clock P. M., I was direct[2 more...]
t spirit in this affair. At daybreak on the eighth, General Lee, to whose support a brigade of thions on the road by artillery. At noon on the eighth, another brigade of the Thirteenth corps arrivry moved from Pleasant Hill at daybreak on the eighth, the head of the column halting at St. Patricke work at eleven o'clock on the morning of the eighth, with one of my staff officers, and felt that miles on the seventh, fifty-seven miles on the eighth, eighteen miles on the ninth, and nine miles orought in until late on the morning of the eighth instant. On the evening of the seventh instant,Ransom's command. At half past 5 A. M. on the eighth, General Ransom marched with the remainder of enemy. At four o'clock on the evening of the eighth, General Mouton, without the order or knowledg-eight to Natchitoches. On the night of the eighth, Churchill and Parsons came up. The pursuit waAt three o'clock, forty minutes, P. M., on the eighth, while bivouacked at a stream seven miles east[1 more...]
tenth. They commenced crossing Berwick's Bay on the ninth. It was a very slow process, on account of the wantt arrived there at half past 8 on the morning of the ninth, effecting a junction with the forces of General Smihed that point the evening previous. Early on the ninth, the troops were prepared for action, the movements spective armies, at twelve o'clock, midnight, on the ninth, I countermanded the order for the return of the tra Admiral Porter at one o'clock on the morning of the ninth, which was delivered in person at two A. M., by Colofty-seven miles on the eighth, eighteen miles on the ninth, and nine miles on the tenth of April; total, one humory's division formed the rear guard. On the ninth instant, General Emory's division was posted on the righ came up. The pursuit was resumed at daylight on the ninth. In the evening the enemy was found in line of batt Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill on the eighth and ninth instant. At three o'clock, forty minutes, P. M., on t
a very slow process, on account of the want of transportation; but Weitzel and Emory succeeded in crossing by dark on the tenth, their transportation and supplies being sent over the same night and the following morning. General Grover arrived on the tenth, in the evening, and his command was immediately put on board the transports of my command, and sent up the Atchafalaya and Grand Lake to turn the enemy's position; landing his force at Indian Bend, above Fort Bisland. It was estimated thaon. The fleet sailed from Grand Ecore on the seventh, and reached its destination at Loggy Bayou on the evening of the tenth, one day after the battle at Pleasant Hill, and two days after the engagement at Sabine Cross-Roads. General T. Kilby Smith received a verbal message on the evening of the tenth, and on the morning of the eleventh written orders to return. The transports were in a crippled condition, rudders unshipped and wheels broken. The enemy attacked the fleet on its return n
ay, to carry out my instructions by a movement toward Alexandria and Shreveport, or, if possible, across the southern part of Louisiana to Niblett's Bluff. The attack upon Sabine Pass was made the eighth of September. The fleet returned on the eleventh. On the thirteenth, orders were given for the overland movement. The troops were rapidly transferred to the Teche Bayou, and organized for this expedition. But it was soon found impracticable, if not impossible, to enter Texas in that directi The remainder of General Emory's line fought handsomely during the whole action, and the enemy was driven back along the whole line with the loss of two guns. During the night the army retreated toward this place, and arrived here on the eleventh instant. I transmitted yesterday a list of the casualties. The behavior of officers and men was excellent. I beg leave particularly to call the attention of the commanding General to the conduct of Generals Emory and Dwight, which was admirable i
vening of the tenth, and on the morning of the eleventh written orders to return. The transports were in a crippled condition, rudders unshipped and wheels broken. The enemy attacked the fleet on its return near Pleasant Hill Landing, on the twelfth, with a force of two thousand five hundred cavalry, a strong reserve infantry, and a battery of six guns, under General Greene. But the troops, protected by cotton bales and bales of hay, with the gunboats, kept up a deadly fire, and drove the enth. The water upon the dam was steadily falling, but at nine o'clock on the thirteenth all the boats had safely passed. Preparations had been made for the movement of the army the evening after the passage of the boats below the dam on the twelfth, and after all were below on the thirteenth, orders were given for the march. The construction of the dam was exclusively the work of the army. But little aid or encouragement was rendered by officers of the navy, except by Lieutenant A. R.
, a distance of twenty miles, encountering small bodies of the enemy during the march. On the thirteenth, we had advanced within four hundred yards of his works, on both sides of the Bayou Teche, dripon Sabine Pass was made the eighth of September. The fleet returned on the eleventh. On the thirteenth, orders were given for the overland movement. The troops were rapidly transferred to the Techpied the north bank of the river with two thousand five hundred men, attacked the fleet on the thirteenth, but was driven back with loss. The navagation up and down the river was intricate and difficontoon bridge was thrown across the river during the night. Our pickets were driven in on the thirteenth, but the enemy appeared, upon a reconnoissance made in force, to have gone below, either for tg after the passage of the boats below the dam on the twelfth, and after all were below on the thirteenth, orders were given for the march. The construction of the dam was exclusively the work of t
Hudson, about twelve thousand strong. The pickets of the enemy were encountered near Baton Rouge, and a considerable force in the vicinity of Port Hudson, which was quickly driven in. The army reached the rear of the works on the night of the fourteenth, and made a demonstration as for an attack on the works the next morning. The arrangement between the Admiral and myself was, that the passage of the batteries by the navy should be attempted in the gray of the morning, the army making a simulre laden with ammunition and ordnance stores, but the energy of the officers and men brought off every boat. The only loss in stores was a hundred sacks of oats, thrown overboard for the relief of a steamer aground. They reached Compte on the fourteenth, with a loss of one man killed and eighteen wounded, where they met a force from the army sent to their assistance, and reached Grand Ecore on the fifteenth without further obstruction. General T. Kilby Smith, to whose courtesy I am indebted f
ly from Lieutenant-General Grant, were not to be abandoned,) at New Orleans, and at Port Hudson, which was threatened by a vigorous and active enemy. Smaller garrisons at Baton Rouge and Donaldsonville, on the river, and at Pensacola and Key West, on the coast, constituted the balance of forces under my command. It had been arranged that the troops concentrated at Franklin should move for the Red River on the seventh of March, to meet the forces of General Sherman at Alexandria on the seventeenth. But for causes stated by General Franklin, their march was delayed until the thirteenth, at which time the advance under General A. L. Lee left Franklin, the whole column following soon after, and arriving at Alexandria — the cavalry on the nineteenth, and the infantry on the twenty-fifth. On the thirteenth of March, 1864, one division of the Sixteenth corps, under Brigadier-General Mower, and one division of the Seventeenth corps, under Brigadier-General T. Kilby Smith,--the whole u
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