hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 901 143 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 874 6 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 810 42 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 588 6 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 529 95 Browse Search
James Longstreet 468 2 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 465 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 428 0 Browse Search
J. R. Trimble 377 3 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 310 68 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 2,826 total hits in 430 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Magnolia, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
fall, and supplies would then have to be hauled from Simmsport. The country would supply scarcely anything. General Taylor was left in command of the cavalry, and Polignac's division to watch and pursue the enemy. Parsons, Churchill, and Walker arrived at Shreveport on the sixteenth April, en route for Camden. Walker moved on the right via Minden, Parsons in the centre via Benton, and Churchill on the left, following Red River thirty-five miles up, and then turning to the right, passing Magnolia. Walker's division was halted twenty miles beyond Minden on reception from General Taylor that the enemy was intrenching at Natchitoches, and had thrown two pontoon bridges across Red River at Grand Ecore, the steamboat landing at that place. In this position, forty-eight miles from Shreveport, one hundred and fifteen from Natchitoches, and sixty-six from Camden, General Walker was in good attitude to meet any movement of Banks's in the direction of Washita or Shreveport, or any movement
Princeton, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
t of the twenty-ninth, the head of our infantry was at Tulip, fourteen miles from the Saline, at Jenkins's Ferry, and forty-nine miles from Camden. A brigade of our cavalry was at the Bottom Saline, three miles from the river. Our rear was at Princeton, twenty-two miles from Jenkins's Ferry, and thirty-two miles from Camden. The rear of the enemy's column had passed Tulip at eight that A. M. The Saline Bottom was, however, a quagmire, five miles wide, and it was possible his trains had not bd cross the Saline at Benton. He had not learned of Steele's retreat. In a vague hope of being able to overtake the enemy's rear guard next morning, the troops were rested from dark until one o'clock--Churchill and Parsons at Tulip, Walker at Princeton, eight miles to the rear. At one o'clock the column moved forward through deep mud, rain coming down in torrents. At daylight, the two divisions were up with the cavalry advance, having marched fifty-two miles in forty-six hours. Skirmishing
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
thousand men, distributed from Berwick's Bay to Alexandria and Grand Ecore on Red River. These positions covered every line of communication to the Red River countrhe only alternative open to us was to attempt a crossing at the north side of Red River,--an excedingly difficult and dangerous movement. At the same time a forcehim from it, and should have been compelled to accept the chances of crossing Red River above Cane River in the presence of the enemy on both sides of the river. Orine Bluff, to Monroe, for this purpose. This would have united our forces on Red River, and insured the success of the campaign. The twenty-eighth of February, he ated south with his land and naval forces. The bridge had been thrown across Red River, to enable the enemy's infantry to protect his transports and gunboats from Gneral, commanding. headquarters First division, Nineteenth army corps, Alexandria, Louisiana, April 28, 1864. Major Wickham Hoffman, Assistant-Adjutant General:
Galveston Bay (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
midable army of from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and cooperation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my despatch of February second, but was thought, upon information received by the government, to be exaggerated. The defences of the enemy consisted of a series of works covering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River, Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for the defence of the Red River, and extensive and formidable works at Trinity, the junction of the Tensas and Washita at Camden, commanding approaches from the north. To meet these forces of the enemy, it was proposed to concentrate in some general plan of operations fifteen thousand of the troops under command of General Steele, a detachment of ten thousand from the command of Gen
Grand Lake (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
iver were defended by strong works at Butte à la Rose, and on Bayou Teche by strong land fortifications near Pattersonville, called Fort Bisland, extending from Grand Lake on the right to impassable swamps on the left of the Teche Bayou. Butte á la Rose was defended by the gunboats of the enemy, and a garrison of three hundred tog resistance at Vermilion Bayou, from which position they were quickly driven. The gunboats, in the mean time, had encountered the steamer Queen of the west on Grand Lake, destroying her and capturing her officers and crew. We reached Opelousas on the twentieth of April, the enemy retreating toward Alexandria in disorder, and rders had been sent to Brashear City to remove all stores, and hold the position, with the aid of the gunboats to the last. But the enemy succeeded in crossing Grand Lake by means of rafts, and surprised and captured the garrison on the twenty-second of June, consisting of about three hundred men, two thirty pounder Parrott guns,
Grand Ecore (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
btful, if the fleet reached any point above Grand Ecore, whether it would be able to return. By faof the tenth the army leisurely returned to Grand Ecore. The wounded were immediately visited by Dortable condition. The fleet sailed from Grand Ecore on the seventh, and reached its destination which had been aground several miles below Grand Ecore for several days, sent me word by Colonel Wrce, that the army contemplated moving from Grand Ecore toward Alexandria, against the advice or wi nautical affairs. The army marched from Grand Ecore on the morning of the twenty-second of Apri that all my vessels navigated the river to Grand Ecore with ease, and with some of them I reached fact that the gunboats were unable to pass Grand Ecore until the seventh, justified the belief thapt advance of all the troops and fleet from Grand Ecore, on the morning of the seventh, it was suppthe army at Alexandria sixteen days, and at Grand Ecore three days. It occupied four days in moving[36 more...]
Pleasant Hill (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
eral Lee, discovered the enemy in force at Pleasant Hill, thirty-six miles distant, and establishedt passed the negro brigade on the route to Pleasant Hill. A very heavy rain fell all day on the seIn passing the troops from Natchitoches to Pleasant Hill, I endeavored as much as possible to accelseventh the advance drove a small force to Pleasant Hill, and from there to Wilson's farm, three minear Carroll's Mill, about nine miles from Pleasant Hill, where our forces bivouacked for the nightsant Grove, where this action occurred, to Pleasant Hill, was fifteen miles. It was certain that th Farm, Sabine Cross-Roads, Pleasant Grove, Pleasant Hill, Compte, Monet's Bluff, and several combatstant, General Lee drove the enemy through Pleasant Hill, and encamped on a stream about eight mileidnight, we were ordered to fall back upon Pleasant Hill, about fifteen miles distant, and cover throad and impeded our march. On reaching Pleasant Hill, I went into line of battle, faced to the [12 more...]
Ponchatoula (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
d. Our loss in this affair was very slight, the enemy not resisting us with any determination until we were in the vicinity of their outer works. Colonel John S. Clark, of my staff, received a wound while closely reconnoitring the position of the enemy, which disabled him from further participation in the campaign. Pending these general movements, a force under command of Colonel Thomas S. Clark, of the Sixth Michigan volunteers, was sent out from New Orleans to destroy the bridge at Ponchatoula, and a small force under Colonel F. S. Nickerson, of the Fourteenth Maine volunteers, to destroy the enemy's communication by the Jackson Railroad, and the bridges on the Amite River. Both these objects were successfully accomplished. Endeavors were made at this time to collect at Baton Rouge a sufficient force to justify an attack upon Port Hudson, either by assault or siege; but the utmost force that could be collected for this purpose did not exceed twelve or fourteen thousand men.
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
country. It would have held a large force of rebel troops in the vicinity of Houston, enabled us to penetrate the territory of Texas at any time, or to concentratee enemy's forces were then disposed — that we could concentrate, and move upon Houston by land with fifteen to seventeen thousand (15,000 to 17,000) men, before it wssible for the enemy to collect his forces for its defence. The occupation of Houston would place in our hands the control of all the railway communications of Texalete, both as it regarded the occupation of Sabine Pass and operations against Houston and Galveston. The enemy had at this time all his forces in that quarter, anden transferred to the coast in such force as to make certain the occupation of Houston or Galveston. From this point I intended to withdraw my troops to the Island ans by railway, or by the river, compelling the enemy to maintain an army near Houston, and preventing his concentrating his forces for the invasion of Louisiana, Ar
Cowleech Fork Sabine River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 89
e thousand to thirty thousand men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and cooperation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my despatch of February second, but was thought, upon information received by the government, to be exaggerated. The defences of the enemy consisted of a series of works covering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River, Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for the defence of the Red River, and extensive and formidable works at Trinity, the junction of the Tensas and Washita at Camden, commanding approaches from the north. To meet these forces of the enemy, it was proposed to concentrate in some general plan of operations fifteen thousand of the troops under command of General Steele, a detachment of ten thousand from the command of General Sherman, and a force of fro
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...