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Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ied by fire and blood. They brought food, and words of good cheer and hope. How they do scorn those copperhead knaves of the North. The fourth day they marched us six miles, and again we slept in the open air, with a terrific rain storm raging all night. The next day beggars description. It rained all day. We crossed one stream, waist deep, by wading. Some of the men swam it. The road was up the bed of a creek, and it was from ankle to knee deep more than half the time. We reached Tullahoma late in the evening. The men had to stay all night on a piece of ground three inches deep in mud, with nothing but green oak wood to make fires, and nothing to eat but meat, without vessels to cook it in; and it rained until midnight. It then turned cold, and next morning Bragg stripped us of our overcoats and canteens, and shipped us on cars to Chattanooga, and we have frozen and starved our way here. The result is that we have lost more men by their treatment than by their bullets, a
Thompson's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
rbarity. General Garfield's order. headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Murfreesboroa, April 25, 1863. Circular. the following statement of an officer of high rank and well known integrity, captured at the late battle at Thompson's Station, and now a prisoner of war in the Libby Prison, at Richmond, is published for the information of the army and of the American people. It is important that our fellow-citizens at home, and especially every soldier in the army, should knowe One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio being left in the rear of our wagon train, which was large. After marching about two miles, our cavalry met the enemy's pickets and outposts, and severe skirmishing was kept up until we came in sight of Thompson's Station, the enemy falling back. When we reached the point where the railroad joins the pike, the enemy opened upon us with a heavy battery. Colonel Coburn soon ordered one section of the battery to take position on the hill, on the left of the
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ng burned the boat and carried off all the medical stores, they left the sick and wounded to perish on the shore, in a drenching rain. We cannot believe that the justice of God will allow such a people. to prosper. Let every soldier know that death on the battle-field is preferable to a surrender followed by such outrages as their comrades have undergone. J. A. Garfield, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff. From the statement we make the following extracts: Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., March 30, 1863. on the fourth of March, our brigade, being parts of the Thirty-third and Eighty-fifth Indiana, Twenty-second Wisconsin, and Nineteenth Michigan, numbering in all fifteen hundred and eighty-nine, together with the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio, and six hundred cavalry and one battery of six small guns, were ordered to proceed from Franklin to Spring Hill, ten miles south on the Columbia pike, and thirty miles from Nashville, Colonel John Coburn, of the Thirty-thir
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
nd his force consisted of six brigades, under Major-General Van Dorn, Brigadier-Generals French, Armstrong, Crosby, Martin, and Jackson. Infantry had no chance to escape after the fight once began. Prisoners of war! I had supposed that soldiers taken in fair battle were treated as gentlemen, at least as human beings; but such is not the practice in this cursed land. I will state simply the facts. We were taken in the afternoon, after four hours fighting, and marched fourteen miles to Columbia. On the way the men had to wade the creek, over knee deep, and to ferry across Duck River, taking till after midnight to reach the town, when we were crowded into the court-house, so thick that we could scarcely lie down. Next day it rained all day. We were marched out three miles from town, halted, and kept until four o'clock, having had nothing to eat since daylight before the fight — nearly thirty-six hours time! Then one and a half pounds of meat was issued, without bread, for th
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
attery. Our skirmishers soon started up the enemy, and we found, posted behind stone walls, fences, and brush, at the foot of the hill, two whole brigades of dismounted cavalry. Seeing it impossible to advance farther, the two regiments lay down and were covered by the buildings and fences. We were not long here before Colonel Coburn ordered us back to the hill from which we started. We started back, and so soon as we were unmasked from the buildings, two regiments, from Arkansas and Texas, started after us with a yell, pursuing and firing on us all the way back, which, with their batteries playing on us also, made our situation pretty hot. Both of our regiments lost several killed and wounded, going and returning, and all this time not a shot had been fired by us. But as soon as we reached the hill, we turned and drove back the enemy faster than they came, killing Colonel Earl, of Arkansas. They again rallied and charged on us, but were driven back. It now became evident th
Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
t deep, on a foot-log, which was springy; and as the men were slow, and some of the poor fellows got on their hands and knees to keep from falling, Confederate officers stood with stones in their hands to make them walk. Next day we reached Shelbyville, at night. The men's rations had given out the second day, and although it was known we were coming, our men had to stay in the court-house yard, it raining all night. They got nothing to eat until two o'clock next afternoon. Here let me say, God bless the ladies of Shelbyville! They are as good Union people as ever lived. They have been tried by fire and blood. They brought food, and words of good cheer and hope. How they do scorn those copperhead knaves of the North. The fourth day they marched us six miles, and again we slept in the open air, with a terrific rain storm raging all night. The next day beggars description. It rained all day. We crossed one stream, waist deep, by wading. Some of the men swam it. The road
Duck River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
nch, Armstrong, Crosby, Martin, and Jackson. Infantry had no chance to escape after the fight once began. Prisoners of war! I had supposed that soldiers taken in fair battle were treated as gentlemen, at least as human beings; but such is not the practice in this cursed land. I will state simply the facts. We were taken in the afternoon, after four hours fighting, and marched fourteen miles to Columbia. On the way the men had to wade the creek, over knee deep, and to ferry across Duck River, taking till after midnight to reach the town, when we were crowded into the court-house, so thick that we could scarcely lie down. Next day it rained all day. We were marched out three miles from town, halted, and kept until four o'clock, having had nothing to eat since daylight before the fight — nearly thirty-six hours time! Then one and a half pounds of meat was issued, without bread, for three days rations. We were then marched four miles farther, and encamped for the night, with
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
d hope. How they do scorn those copperhead knaves of the North. The fourth day they marched us six miles, and again we slept in the open air, with a terrific rain storm raging all night. The next day beggars description. It rained all day. We crossed one stream, waist deep, by wading. Some of the men swam it. The road was up the bed of a creek, and it was from ankle to knee deep more than half the time. We reached Tullahoma late in the evening. The men had to stay all night on a piece of ground three inches deep in mud, with nothing but green oak wood to make fires, and nothing to eat but meat, without vessels to cook it in; and it rained until midnight. It then turned cold, and next morning Bragg stripped us of our overcoats and canteens, and shipped us on cars to Chattanooga, and we have frozen and starved our way here. The result is that we have lost more men by their treatment than by their bullets, and a Northern penitentiary is a palace in comparison with this place.
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ts lay down and were covered by the buildings and fences. We were not long here before Colonel Coburn ordered us back to the hill from which we started. We started back, and so soon as we were unmasked from the buildings, two regiments, from Arkansas and Texas, started after us with a yell, pursuing and firing on us all the way back, which, with their batteries playing on us also, made our situation pretty hot. Both of our regiments lost several killed and wounded, going and returning, and all this time not a shot had been fired by us. But as soon as we reached the hill, we turned and drove back the enemy faster than they came, killing Colonel Earl, of Arkansas. They again rallied and charged on us, but were driven back. It now became evident that we had encountered the whole of Van Dorn's and Forrest's forces. Colonel Coburn now brought the Nineteenth and Twenty-second on the west side of the pike, and leaving the Thirty-third to protect the hill on its south face; the Tenth
Spring Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
igadier-General and Chief of Staff. From the statement we make the following extracts: Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., March 30, 1863. on the fourth of March, our brigade, being parts of the Thirty-third and Eighty-fifth Indiana, Twenty-second Wisconsin, and Nineteenth Michigan, numbering in all fifteen hundred and eighty-nine, together with the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio, and six hundred cavalry and one battery of six small guns, were ordered to proceed from Franklin to Spring Hill, ten miles south on the Columbia pike, and thirty miles from Nashville, Colonel John Coburn, of the Thirty-third, in command. When we were about four miles out we met the enemy, and, after a sharp skirmish, drove them back, without loss on our side. Their loss was fifteen killed and wounded. On the morning of the fifth we started early, the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio being left in the rear of our wagon train, which was large. After marching about two miles, our cavalry met t
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