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Caroline (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
and left no data from which we can get the exact estimate.1301600 9812028284449  6787873303671481718596542976 R. E. Rodes, Brigadier-General, commanding Division. Report of Colonel O'Neal. headquarters Rodes's brigade, Santee, Caroline county, Va., May 12, 1863. Captain G. Peyton, A. A. G.: Captain: In obedience to orders, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of Rodes's brigade during the eight days campaign, commencing on the twenty-ninth April and e special attention. Also, lists of casualties. I am, Captain, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Edward A. O'Neal, Colonel, commanding Brigade. Report of Colonel Hall. headquarters Fifth Alabama regiment, Santee, Caroline county, Virginia, May 8, 1863. Captain H. A. Whiting, A. A. G., Rodes's Brigade: Captain: In obedience to an order from headquarters, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by Rodes's brigade while under my command, in the ba
Welford (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
uted with spirit and rapidity, and the enemy fell back with precipitation before our advance, which was resumed soon afterwards. General Wright continued to follow the line of the railroad without opposition until he arrived at the Catharine or Wellford's furnace, where he had a sharp encounter with a superior force of the enemy. Darkness put a stop to this conflict without any decided results having been attained, and at ten o'clock at night, in obedience to orders from Lieutenant-General Jacicksburg railroad, I moved rapidly up that road, keeping Captain Wilson's company, Forty-eighth Georgia regiment, and Captain Scragg's company, Twenty-second Georgia regiment, well in advance, as skirmishers. About six o'clock P. M. I reached Wellford's iron furnace, one and a half miles south-west of Chancellorsville, where I found Major-General Stuart, who informed me that the enemy, in considerable force, was occupying the thick woods north of, and near the furnace, in the direction of Ch
Spotsylvania county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
their valuable and efficient services during all the week's operations. I am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, A. R. Wright. Brigadier-General, commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Perry. headquarters Perry's brigade, May 9, 1863. To Major Thomas S. Mills, A. A. General: Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command, consisting of the Second and Eighth Florida regiments, in the recent engagements in Spottsylvania county: On the evening of the twenty-ninth of April, in compliance with orders from division headquarters, I moved my command to the heights in front of Falmouth, and throwing my pickets out to the river bank, remained in line of battle until about eleven o'clock on the morning of the first of May, when, in obedience to orders from Major-General Anderson, I moved with my command up the plank road, and into the old turnpike road. I advanced up this road until I came to our line of battle,
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Oak Church. Thence, after a short delay, we moved to Hamilton's Crossing. Here I was ordered to put the brigade in line of battle, in a skirt of pine woods, about one mile to the right of the railroad and just in rear of our works. The brigade rested here during the balance of the day and until three o'clock next morning, when I was ordered to move the brigade to the right, about half a mile, and place it in the intrenchments — the right resting on Massaponax Creek and the left on the Bowling Green road. During the day the enemy's batteries across the river shelled a portion of the line,--the Third and Sixth Alabama regiments,--but, being protected by the earthworks and the hill, no damage was done. At three o'clock on the morning of the first May, I moved the brigade to Hamilton's Crossing, left in front, and thence to the plank road, some seven or eight miles, where I was ordered to prepare for immediate action, to support the forces of General Anderson, who were engaging the e
Massaponax Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
r to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade in the series of skirmishes and battles, opening at Massaponax Creek and ending in the splendid victory at Chancellorsville: Wednesday, A. M., April 29th.--The brigade was placed below Massaponax Creek to dispute the enemy's crossing, and remained in that position, occasionally annoyed by their artillery, (by which I lost a few men,) and kept on the alert by picket firing till Thursday evening, when we were withdrawn to a point rossing, and was placed in position on the extreme right of the army, extending — perpendicular to the railroad — to Massaponax Creek. A portion of Ramseur's brigade being at the time on picket on the river, he was ordered, with the whole of his brirdered to move the brigade to the right, about half a mile, and place it in the intrenchments — the right resting on Massaponax Creek and the left on the Bowling Green road. During the day the enemy's batteries across the river shelled a portion of <
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
enth instant. It remains now but to speak of our losses. They were heavy, (lists of which have already been forwarded to division headquarters, Brigadier-General Pender,) and among them I regret to announce the death of Colonel James M. Perrin, Orr's rifle regiment, who was mortally wounded while gallantly fighting his regiment at the breastworks, on Sunday, third May. Colonel Perrin was one of the captains of my old regiment, (First South Carolina volunteers,) and on duty with me in South Carolina previous to my coming to Virginia, in 1861. Since then he has, at various times, been under my command. A more zealous or efficient officer could not have been found in this command. Noble, brave, and pious, he lived to win the admiration and esteem of his friends, and we will trust died to receive the reward of a life spent in the strict discharge of every duty. I beg to enclose the reports of the Thirteenth, First, Fourteenth, and Orr's rifles, South Carolina volunteers. The Twe
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
rry's brigade, and at dark the latter was moved to the river to relieve such of the troops of McLaws's division as were on duty above Fredericksburg and opposite Falmouth. About nine o'clock P. M., the same day, I received orders from the commanding General to repair to Chancellorsville, and to make such a disposition of the two vania county: On the evening of the twenty-ninth of April, in compliance with orders from division headquarters, I moved my command to the heights in front of Falmouth, and throwing my pickets out to the river bank, remained in line of battle until about eleven o'clock on the morning of the first of May, when, in obedience to ore of shells upon the enemy, who had halted in the road upon the display of our skirmishers. The advance one of these regiments moved down the river in front of Falmouth, and sought shelter from our artillery fire in the rifle-pits along the river. The other regiments remained in the road, lying down, the stone knolls on either
hey soon encountered a heavy fire of artillery. Pressing on, they soon overtook the second line of battle, then at a halt, except the Stonewall brigade, which was moving (under orders) from the left to the right of the plank road. I ordered Colonel O'Neil not to wait on this movement, but to advance his brigade over the second line. At this moment Colonel O'Neil was disabled.by a fragment of a shell, and in person I made his right regiment (the third Alabama) press forward through the troops,Colonel O'Neil was disabled.by a fragment of a shell, and in person I made his right regiment (the third Alabama) press forward through the troops, and sent a staff officer with directions to Colonel Hall, who succeeded to the command, to continue his advance. The first line was in turn overtaken and passed; but the confusion arising from passing the two lines caused the two regiments on the left of this brigade to become separated from the others. These two moved obliquely to the right, under the immediate command of Colonel Hall, and encountered the fire of the enemy's infantry, posted behind a barricade on the right of the road, and n
J. M. Hall (search for this): chapter 31
welfth Georgia; Colonel Cooke, Fourth Georgia, severely wounded; Colonel Hall, Fifth Alabama; Colonel Christie, Twenty-third North Carolina; C Lieutenant-Colonel Garvin and Major Bryan, and the Fifth, under Colonel Hall and Lieutenant-Colonel Hobson--moved in line of battle with thisirected Major Whiting to move the brigade forward, and to inform Colonel Hall, of the Fifth Alabama, that the command devolved on him. ColonelColonel Hall was, at the time, on the extreme left of the line with his regiment. The brigade moved forward under a most terrific storm of shell, gr took place afterwards I respectfully refer you to the report of Colonel Hall, who so bravely led it, and that of Colonel Pickens, who so gallt, Edward A. O'Neal, Colonel, commanding Brigade. Report of Colonel Hall. headquarters Fifth Alabama regiment, Santee, Caroline counve the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. M. Hall, Colonel, commanding Brigade. Report of Colonel Hamilton.
dwick, Eleventh Alabama; Lieutenants Bankston and Cox, Fourteenth Alabama, all fell fighting with the heroism of veteran soldiers, against greatly superior forces of the enemy. Among the severely wounded are Colonel Royston, Eighth Alabama; Colonel Pinkard, Fourteenth Alabama; Major McCord, Fourteenth Alabama; Captain Cook, Tenth Alabama; Lieutenants Barksdale and Cobb, Lewis's battery; all alike distinguished for their intelligence and valor. I cannot call to your notice all officers that of especial praise, for the conduct of all was excellent; I will, however, report that the five regimental commanders, Colonel Royston, Eighth Alabama, and after his severe wound, Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert, who commanded the Eighth Alabama; Colonel Pinkard, Fourteenth Alabama; Colonel Forney, Tenth Alabama; Colonel Sanders, Eleventh Alabama; Major Williams, Ninth Alabama, were intelligent, energetic, and gallant in commanding, directing, and leading their men. The brigade slept on the field at
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