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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
ed to them. The object of Wise — who it was understood originated the raid — and his fellow-conspirators was, evidently, to capture the arms, proceed at once to Baltimore, arm the ruffians then having control of that city, and complete the then easy conquest of the national capital. An extra locomotive of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, with steam on, was in waiting at the Harper's Ferry bridge; a mysterious party from Baltimore was on the ground, one of whom positively refused the use of the engine to carry Captain Kingsbury beyond the power of the mob from which he had just made his escape; and the next day — the day of the slaughter of the Massachusettas then on the staff of Lieutenant-General Scott, writes as follows: It was doubtless the design of the rebels to procure arms there (Harper's Ferry) and move on Baltimore. Washington was doubtless the ultimate point of attack; but the whole rebel project failed by the destruction of the arms at Harper's Ferry. If these views are<
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
Richmond to capture the place, and secure the fifteen thousand arms which were still in store, and which Floyd and his coadjutors had been unable to dispose of. There was then but one alternative by which to defeat the purpose of the traitors, and the destruction of the arms became a military necessity. About three o'clock P. M. a report was received that several Virginia companies were marching from Charlestown to the Ferry, and it was also ascertained that the agents of the railroad to Winchester had been specially instructed to keep the track clear that night, which was an unusual order, as only day trains were habitually run upon that road. As the necessity for active measures arose much sooner than had been anticipated the preparations were necessarily hastily made; and as the civil employees of the government could not be relied upon, the details of the affair were of course confided to Lieutenant Jones and his men. The powder belonging to the armory was in the magazine on the
Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 34
reeley introduces the fiction with commendable brevity; Mr. Lossing, according to the character and purpose of his work, goes more into detail, and supports himself by a formidable array of marginal references; the authors of Harper's Pictorial history repeat the story with additions, and General Strother, who was on the ground, and who ought to have known, and evidently intended to narrate the facts in his spirited sketch in Harper's Magazine for June, 1866, indorses the general error. In Holland's admirable life of Mr. Lincoln, the story is thus told:-- The government works at Harper's Ferry were blown up and burned by Lieutenant Jones, in command of a company of regulars, moved by the intelligence of an advance of a large confederate force. Mr. Secretary Cameron, whose forgetfulness, as will be shown, is very extraordinary, in his official report at the extra session of Congress in 1861 uses the following language:-- In this connection it is a pleasurable duty to refer to t
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
There was then but one alternative by which to defeat the purpose of the traitors, and the destruction of the arms became a military necessity. About three o'clock P. M. a report was received that several Virginia companies were marching from Charlestown to the Ferry, and it was also ascertained that the agents of the railroad to Winchester had been specially instructed to keep the track clear that night, which was an unusual order, as only day trains were habitually run upon that road. As thrts of the establishment. It therefore became necessary to rely upon the natural combustibility of the materials for the destruction of the workshops and machinery. Between nine and ten o'clock P. M. a gentleman arrived from the direction of Charlestown, and reported that about two thousand men were within a short distance of the place. As this information appeared reliable, the match was soon applied to the trains already laid in the arsenals, and to the combustible materials in the carpent
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 34
eir means to equip a force sufficient to capture the capital, half filled as it was with traitors and lukewarm officials. General Cullum, who was then on the staff of Lieutenant-General Scott, writes as follows: It was doubtless the design of the rebels to procure arms there (Harper's Ferry) and move on Baltimore. Washington was doubtless the ultimate point of attack; but the whole rebel project failed by the destruction of the arms at Harper's Ferry. If these views are correct, is it not probable that not only the capital, but the nation, was thus saved? For if the traitors had then obtained possession of Washington, the concession of belligerent rights by France and England would have been promptly followed by unconditional recognition, and the bastard progeny of rebellion — to quote the language of Edmund Burke, similarly applied — begotten in a drunken delirium, produced by hot spirits drawn from the alembic of hell, would have become legitimatized by a successful revoluti
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 34
d, Captain Kingsbury, of the ordnance department, then on duty in Washington, was ordered, at the suggestion of General Scott, to proceed immecouched in the following terms:-- Adjutant General's office, Washington, April 17, 1861. Sir: By direction of the Secretary of War youd be furnished at the same time by the Secretary. Before leaving Washington, Captain Kingsbury received verbal instructions from General Scot over the cross-ties of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to reach Washington on the evening of the nineteenth, where he found, on his arrival, in the hands of the myrmidons of treason on a triumphal march to Washington. This view of the matter is forcibly presented in Abbott's hisls to procure arms there (Harper's Ferry) and move on Baltimore. Washington was doubtless the ultimate point of attack; but the whole rebel p thus saved? For if the traitors had then obtained possession of Washington, the concession of belligerent rights by France and England would
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 34
he place would soon be in their possession, and if it was to be defended no time must be lost in organizing the Union forces. The shops were accordingly closed, by order of Captain Kingsbury; the men were assembled, and in a brief address the commanding officer described the situation, and called for volunteers. The workmen had been formed into military companies since the John Brown raid. All who were faithful to their allegiance, and willing to protect and defend the property of the United States, were directed to assemble with their company organizations at one o'clock P. M. The order was received with applause; the men dispersed, as was supposed, for their arms and equipments; but the appointed hour arrived, and brought with it no such force as had been expected. Only a small number of the men employed responded to the appeal, and it was uncertain, in view of the active and evil influences then at work around them, how many of these could be relied on at the decisive moment.
France (France) (search for this): chapter 34
heir means to equip a force sufficient to capture the capital, half filled as it was with traitors and lukewarm officials. General Cullum, who was then on the staff of Lieutenant-General Scott, writes as follows: It was doubtless the design of the rebels to procure arms there (Harper's Ferry) and move on Baltimore. Washington was doubtless the ultimate point of attack; but the whole rebel project failed by the destruction of the arms at Harper's Ferry. If these views are correct, is it not probable that not only the capital, but the nation, was thus saved? For if the traitors had then obtained possession of Washington, the concession of belligerent rights by France and England would have been promptly followed by unconditional recognition, and the bastard progeny of rebellion — to quote the language of Edmund Burke, similarly applied — begotten in a drunken delirium, produced by hot spirits drawn from the alembic of hell, would have become legitimatized by a successful revoluti
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
arefully excluded from an official report of the affair by the very Secretary by whose order he was thus suddenly placed in a position of such responsibility; and the same version or perversion of the facts is still reproduced by all the historians of the rebellion. But while Captain Kingsbury's name was thus systematically ignored at the north, and by the war department of the government, his efforts for the cause of the Union were promptly recognized and appreciated elsewhere. In the Staunton (Va.) Spectator, and other southern newspapers, he was denounced for his action at Harper's Ferry as a diabolical monster, and his name held up for reproach and execration among his friends and relatives at the south. A brief glance at the circumstances connected with the attack on Harper's Ferry will show that the events of that night probably had a far more important bearing upon the final result of the rebellion than has ever been publicly ascribed to them. The object of Wise — who it w
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
wo thousand men were within a short distance of the place. As this information appeared reliable, the match was soon applied to the trains already laid in the arsenals, and to the combustible materials in the carpenter's shop, and the room containing the gunstocks. The rifle works, in which there were but a small number of finished arms, on account of their remoteness, could not be conveniently fired. As soon as the buildings were fairly lighted, Lieutenant Jones with his guard left for Hagerstown, while Captain Kingsbury was hardly authorized to leave then, and, was also unwilling to depart before learning the result of his efforts to baffle the Richmond conspirators. For sometime after the beginning of the conflagration the streets of the village were deserted. At length one man, who appeared more enterprising than his neighbors, entered one of the burning arsenals and hauled therefrom into the street a box of arms. On opening it, and not finding the rifle muskets he evidently
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