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Ship Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
most entirely interrupted the water-communication between Fortress Monroe and Ship Point, and made the already bad roads terrible beyond description. In those days Iing, having had an accident to the steamer on the way from Fortress Monroe to Ship Point. I was five hours on horseback (making about five miles), the roads being alnted transports from leaving for several days. The facilities for landing at Ship Point are very poor, and for several days it must have been next to impossible to marm done, although their shells burst handsomely. Am receiving supplies from Ship Point, repairing roads, getting up siege artillery, etc. It seems now almost cerus circumstances. Gen. Sumner has arrived. Most of Richardson's division at Ship Point. I cannot move it from there in present condition of roads until I get more of the point I then occupied. There were no communications to protect beyond Ship Point, and there was no possibility of the roads to Fortress Monroe being troubled
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
r the result as sure as human foresight could make it. On the 3d, then, Franklin's division was disembarked, and was to have moved to the front on the 4th. As soon as the fire of the water-batteries was silenced the gunboats, reinforced by the Galena under the gallant John Rodgers, were to run by and take up a position in rear, whence they could get a nearer fire on the defences and control the road leading from Yorktown to Williamsburg. When this was effected, the artillery of the land dess of the assault, with very little loss, was reasonably certain. In order to diminish the risk to the gunboats as much as possible, I proposed to Flag-Officer Goldsborough and to Capt. Smith, commanding the gunboats, that the gunboats and the Galena should run the batteries the night after we opened fire. If the effect of our fire had equalled our expectations so as to justify an assault during the first day's firing, I am very sure that Capt. Smith would have run by the batteries in broad
Urbana (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
to send gunboats up James river for fear of the Merrimac. The above plan of campaign was adopted unanimously by Maj.-Gen. McDowell and Brig.-Gens. Sumner, Heintzelman, and Keyes, and was concurred in by Maj.-Gen. McClellan, who first proposed Urbana as our base. This army being reduced by forty-five thousand troops, some of them among the best in the service, and without the support of the navy, the plan to which we are reduced bears scarcely any resemblance to the one I voted for. I ccisive and pregnant with great results. Circumstances, among which I will now only mention the uncertainty as to the power of the Merrimac, have compelled me to adopt the present line, as probably safer, though far less brilliant, than that by Urbana. When the movement was commenced I counted upon an active and disposable force of nearly 150,000 men, and intended to throw a strong column upon West Point either by York river or, if that proved impracticable, by a march from the mouth of the S
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
On the same day, at ten P. M., I sent the following to Secretary Stanton: Since Gen. Woodbury's brigade of volunteer engineer troops was only temporarily attached to the 1st corps for special service, and is much needed here, I have directed Gen. Woodbury to bring it here at once. Their services are indispensable. The following letter was written during the evening of April 5: headquarters, Army of Potomac, camp near Yorktown, April 5, 1862. Brig.-Gen. L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. U. S. A.: general: I have now a distinct knowledge of the general position of the enemy in my front. His left is in Yorktown; his line thence extends along and in rear of the Warwick river to its mouth. That stream is an obstacle of great magnitude. It is fordable at only one point (so far as I yet know) below its head, which is near Yorktown; is for several miles unfordable, and has generally a very marshy valley. His batteries and entrenchments render this line an exceedingly formidable one
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
t entirely interrupted the water-communication between Fortress Monroe and Ship Point, and made the already bad roads terribl having had an accident to the steamer on the way from Fortress Monroe to Ship Point. I was five hours on horseback (making e the road and take to the woods. The severe storm at Fortress Monroe prevented transports from leaving for several days. Tip Point, and there was no possibility of the roads to Fortress Monroe being troubled by the enemy. Wool's troops were of no possible use to me beyond holding Fortress Monroe, and would have been of very great use if the surplus had been incorporates. I should therefore be glad to have disposable at Fortress Monroe: I.1st. 2010-inch mortars complete.  2d. 208-inch to march back to Alexandria and immediately embark for Fortress Monroe. L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. I replied to the secretary:something more on the subject. Before starting from Fortress Monroe the best information in our possession clearly indicat
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, life, and material. If we break through and advance, both our flanks will be assailed from two great water-courses in the hands of the enemy; our supplies would give out, and the enemy, equal, if not superior, in numbers, would, with the other advantages, beat and destroy this army. The greatest master of the art of war has said that if you would invade a country successfully, you must have one line of operations and one army, under one general. But what is our condition? The State of Virginia is made to constitute the command, in part or wholly, of some six generals, viz.: Fremont, Banks, McDowell, Wool, Burnside, and McClellan, besides the scrap, over the Chesapeake, in the care of Dix. The great battle of the war is to come off here. If we win it the rebellion will be crushed. If we lose it the consequences will be more horrible than I care to foretell. The plan of campaign I voted for, if carried out with the means proposed, will certainly succeed. If any part of
Ship's Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
es and entrenchments render this line an exceedingly formidable one, entirely too much so (so far as I now understand it) to be carried by a simple assault. I shall employ to-morrow in reconnoissances, repairing roads, establishing a depot at Ship's Point, and in bringing up supplies. Porter, the head of the right column, has moved as close upon the town as the enemy's guns will permit; he is encamped there, supported by Hamilton's division. Porter has been under fire all the afternoon. Buof regulars, Hunt's artillery reserve, and a small cavalry force. Owing to the lack of wagons Casey did not reach Young's Mill until the 16th. Richardson's division reached the front on the same day. Hooker's division commenced arriving at Ship's Point on the 10th. The roads were so bad and wagons so fern that it was with the utmost difficulty supplies could be brought up, and the field-artillery moved with great difficulty. Even the headquarters wagons could not get up, and I slept in a d
Gloucester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
o make a movement from the Severn river upon Gloucester and West Point. I am reduced to a front attas too small to attempt any movement to turn Gloucester without the assistance of the navy, and I warps to land upon the Severn river and attack Gloucester in the rear. My present strength will not for his available vessels unless I can turn Gloucester. I send by mail copies of his letter and onns. I need more force to make the attack on Gloucester. To Brig.-Gen. L. Thomas on April 9: Wea be at Yorktown from 27 to 32 heavy guns, at Gloucester 14 Columbiads. The probable armament of Yory guns and mortars bearing upon Yorktown and Gloucester, their water-batteries, a line of works betwlent effect upon the wharves of Yorktown and Gloucester, in order to prevent the landing of supplies the siege it was apparent that the works at Gloucester could not be carried by assault from the reassault. We captured in the works, including Gloucester, seventy-seven guns and mortars, supplied wi[4 more...]
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
es unfordable, and has generally a very marshy valley. His batteries and entrenchments render this line an exceedingly formidable one, entirely too much so (so far as I now understand it) to be carried by a simple assault. I shall employ to-morrow in reconnoissances, repairing roads, establishing a depot at Ship's Point, and in bringing up supplies. Porter, the head of the right column, has moved as close upon the town as the enemy's guns will permit; he is encamped there, supported by Hamilton's division. Porter has been under fire all the afternoon. But five men killed. His rifled field-guns and sharpshooters have caused some loss to the enemy. Keyes, with two divisions, is in front of Lee's Mill, where the road from Newport News to Williamsburg crosses Warwick river. He has been engaged in an artillery combat of several hours' duration, losing some five killed. At Lee's Mill we have a causeway covered by formidable batteries. The information obtained at Fort Monroe in reg
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
eft here, and you know the pressure under which I did it, and, as I thought, acquiesced in it — certainly not without reluctance. After you left I ascertained that less than 20,000 unorganized men, without a single field-battery, were all you designed to be left for the defence of Washington and Manassas Junction, and part of this even was to go to Gen. Hooker's old position. Gen. Banks's corps, once designed for Manassas Junction, was diverted and tied up on the line of Winchester and Strasburg, and could not leave it without again exposing the upper Potomac and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. This presented, or would present when McDowell and Sumner should be gone, a great temptation to the enemy to turn back from the Rappahannock and sack Washington. My implicit order that Washington should, by the judgment of all the commanders of army corps, be left entirely secure, had been neglected. It was precisely this that drove me to detain McDowell. I do not forget that I was s
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