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Hudson, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
drizzle. . . . April 18, 1.15 A. M. . . . About a half-hour ago the accustomed intermittent sound of artillery was varied in its monotony by a very heavy and continued rattle of musketry, with the accompaniment of a very respectable firing of artillery. I started at once for the telegraph-office, and endeavored in vain for some ten or fifteen minutes to arouse the operators at the stations in the direction of the firing. So I ordered twenty of the escort to saddle up, and started off Hudson, Sweitzer, and the Duc de Chartres to learn the state of the case. The firing has ceased now for some minutes, and I am still ignorant as to its whereabouts and cause. Of course I must remain up until I know what it is. I had had Arthur, Wright, Hammerstein, Radowitz, and the Comte de Paris, as well as Colburn, also up, with some of the escort ready to move or carry orders, as the case may be, but just now told them to lie down until I sent for them. It is a beautiful moonlight night, cle
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ieving me from command. If they will simply let me alone I feel sure of success; but will they do it? May 5, 9.30 A. M. . . . You will have learned ere this that Yorktown is ours. It is a place of immense strength, and was very heavily armed. It so happened that our preparation for the attack was equally formidable, so that Lee, Johnston, and Davis confessed that they could not hold the place. They evacuated it in a great hurry, leaving their heavy guns, baggage, etc. I sent the cavalry after them at once, and our advance is now engaged with them at Williamsburg. The weather is infamous; it has been raining all night, and is still raining heavily; no signs of stopping; roads awful. I hope to get to West Point to-day, although the weather has delayed us terribly. It could not well be worse, but we will get through nevertheless. The villains (secesh) have scattered torpedoes everywhere — by springs, wells, etc. It is the most murderous and barbarous thing I ever heard of
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
[April 1 to May 5, 1862] Steamer commodore, April 1, 1862 Potomac river, 4.15 P. M. As soon as possible after reaching Alexandria I got the Commodore under way and put off. I did not feel safe until I could fairly see Alexandria behind us. I have brought a tug with us to take back despatches from Budd's Ferry, where I shall stop a few hours for the purpose of winding up everything. I found that if I remained at Alexandria I would be annoyed very much, and perhaps be sent for from Washington.. . . Officially speaking, I feel very glad to get away from that sink of iniquity. . . 8 P. M. I have just returned from a trip in one of the naval vessels with Capt. Seymour to take a look at the rebel batteries (recently abandoned) at Shipping Point, etc. They were pretty formidable, and it would have given us no little trouble to take possession of them had they held firm. It makes only the more evident the propriety of my movements, by which Manassas was forced to be evacuated
Ship Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
camped about five miles from Yorktown: have been here two or three days. Have now visited both the right and left, and, in spite of the heavy rain, must ride to Ship Point and our right immediately after breakfast. All I care for about the rain is the health and comfort of the men. They are more fond of me than ever; more enthusiep in mud; roads infamous: but we will get through it. I have had great difficulty in arranging about supplies — so few wagons and such bad roads. Rode down to Ship Point yesterday morning. . . . 9 A. M. Interrupted and unable to finish. Have been bothered all the evening, but am getting things straightened out. .. . Starng of our men admirable. I received to-day a letter from Burnside, which I enclose. . . Franklin arrived yesterday and spent the night in my tent. He is at Ship Point to-night; I expect his division to-morrow. .. . Don't be at all discouraged; all is going well. I know exactly what I am about. I can't go with a rush over st
Potomac River (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Chapter 18: private letters. [April 1 to May 5, 1862] Steamer commodore, April 1, 1862 Potomac river, 4.15 P. M. As soon as possible after reaching Alexandria I got the Commodore under way and put off. I did not feel safe until I could fairly see Alexandria behind us. I have brought a tug with us to take back despatches from Budd's Ferry, where I shall stop a few hours for the purpose of winding up everything. I found that if I remained at Alexandria I would be annoyed very much, and perhaps be sent for from Washington.. . . Officially speaking, I feel very glad to get away from that sink of iniquity. . . 8 P. M. I have just returned from a trip in one of the naval vessels with Capt. Seymour to take a look at the rebel batteries (recently abandoned) at Shipping Point, etc. They were pretty formidable, and it would have given us no little trouble to take possession of them had they held firm. It makes only the more evident the propriety of my movements, by which Man
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ieving me from command. If they will simply let me alone I feel sure of success; but will they do it? May 5, 9.30 A. M. . . . You will have learned ere this that Yorktown is ours. It is a place of immense strength, and was very heavily armed. It so happened that our preparation for the attack was equally formidable, so that Lee, Johnston, and Davis confessed that they could not hold the place. They evacuated it in a great hurry, leaving their heavy guns, baggage, etc. I sent the cavalry after them at once, and our advance is now engaged with them at Williamsburg. The weather is infamous; it has been raining all night, and is still raining heavily; no signs of stopping; roads awful. I hope to get to West Point to-day, although the weather has delayed us terribly. It could not well be worse, but we will get through nevertheless. The villains (secesh) have scattered torpedoes everywhere — by springs, wells, etc. It is the most murderous and barbarous thing I ever heard of
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
lent. No general ever labored under greater disadvantages, but I will carry it through in spite of everything. I hope Franklin will be here to-morrow or next day. I will then invest Gloucester and attack it at the same time I do York. When the Galena arrives I will cause it to pass the batteries, take them in reverse, and cut off the enemy's communications by York river. As I write I hear our guns constantly sounding and the bursting of shells in Secession. 9 P. M. The firing of last ut I have taken all possible precautions, and hope to gain the information necessary with but little loss. There is no other choice than to run the risk. . . . Everything is as quiet now as if there were no enemy within a hundred miles of us The Galena, under Rodgers, will be here by day after tomorrow. April 26. Again raining, and has been all the morning. Grover carried a redoubt of the rebels most handsomely this morning. It was one from which they had it in their power to annoy the
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
m had they held firm. It makes only the more evident the propriety of my movements, by which Manassas was forced to be evacuated and these batteries with it. The trip was quite interesting. . . . Steamer commodore, April 3, Hampton roads, 1.30 P. M. . . I have been up to my eyes in business since my arrival. We reached here about four yesterday P. M.; ran into the wharf and unloaded the horses, then went out and anchored. Marcy and I at once took a tug and ran out to the flag-ship Minnesota to see Goldsborough, where we remained until about nine, taking tea with him. On our return we found Gen. Heintzelman, soon followed by Porter and Smith, all of whom remained here all night. I sat up very late arranging movements, and had my hands full. I have been hard at work all the morning, and not yet on shore. Dine with Gen. Wool to-day at four, and go thence to our camp. We move to-morrow A. M. Three divisions take the direct road to Yorktown, and will encamp at Howard's Brid
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
gh, where we remained until about nine, taking tea with him. On our return we found Gen. Heintzelman, soon followed by Porter and Smith, all of whom remained here all night. I sat up very late arranging movements, and had my hands full. I have been hard at work all the morning, and not yet on shore. Dine with Gen. Wool to-day at four, and go thence to our camp. We move to-morrow A. M. Three divisions take the direct road to Yorktown, and will encamp at Howard's Bridge. Two take the James River road and go to Young's Mill. The reserve goes to Big Bethel, where my headquarters will be to-morrow night. My great trouble is in the want of wagons — a terrible drawback; but I cannot wait for them. I hope to get possession, before to-morrow night, of a new landing-place some seven or eight miles from Yorktown, which will help us very much. It is probable that we shall have some fighting to-morrow; not serious, but we may have the opportunity of drubbing Magruder. The harbor here
Gloucester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
day. Secretary Fox spent last night with me. As soon as he had gone I rode to Porter's camp, thence to the river-bank to meet Capt. Missroom, commanding the gunboats. Have had an excellent view of the water defences of Yorktown, as well as of Gloucester. The enemy is very strong and is adding to his works and the number of his men. I could see them coming in on schooners. But as my heavy guns are not yet landed, and the navy do not feel strong enough to go at them, I can only hurry forward omy stand-by-so true and faithful. Many of my aides are excellent. No general ever labored under greater disadvantages, but I will carry it through in spite of everything. I hope Franklin will be here to-morrow or next day. I will then invest Gloucester and attack it at the same time I do York. When the Galena arrives I will cause it to pass the batteries, take them in reverse, and cut off the enemy's communications by York river. As I write I hear our guns constantly sounding and the bursti
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