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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e went on board the boat, where I got about three hours sleep until we reached Parkersburg. I have been hard at work all day, for I found everything in great confusion. Came up here in a boat about an hour ago, and shall go back to Parkersburg in two or three hours. . . We start from Parkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Barker's Illinois). Two Indiana regiments leave in the morning just after us. I shall have five additional regiments at Grafton to-morrow afternoon. I shall have some eighteen regiments two batteries, two companies of cavalry at my disposal — enough to thrash anything I find. I think the danger has been greatly exaggerated, and anticipate little or no chance of winning laurels. . . . A terrible storm is passing over us now; thunder and lightning terrible in the extreme. . . . Grafton, Sunday, June 23,
Chillicothe (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
natch a few moments to write you. We got off at 11.30 yesterday morning, and had a continual ovation all along the road. At every station where we stopped crowds had assembled to see the young general gray-headed old men and women, mothers holding up their children to take my hand, girls, boys, all sorts, cheering and crying, God bless you! I never went through such a scene in my life, and never expect to go through such another one. You would have been surprised at the excitement. At Chillicothe the ladies had prepared a dinner, and I had to be trotted through. They gave me about twenty beautiful bouquets and almost killed me with kindness. The trouble will be to fill their expectations, they seem to be so high. I could hear them say, He is our own general ; Look at him, how young he is ; He will thrash them ; He'll do, etc., etc. ad infinitum. . . . We reached here about three in the morning, and at once went on board the boat, where I got about three hours sleep until we
Clarksburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
! B. has represented a personal interview as an official treaty . . . . Captain Howe is at Clarksburg-Guentler with him. Mack is here with us. . . . I don't know exactly when I shall be able to leperson, everything seems to go wrong. . . . I expect in the course of an hour or two to get to Clarksburg — will probably march twelve miles thence to-day — with Howe's battery, Mack's and the Chicagos annoyed me much, but I hope to do such work here as will set criticism at defiance. . . . Clarksburg, June 30. . . . Again great delays here; will certainly get off by four A. M. to-morrow, a unsophisticated, looking up to me as their deliverer from tyranny. Camp 14 miles south of Clarksburg, July 2. . . . We start in a few moments to Buckhannon. I have with me two regiments, a b. I intend having a picked brigade with me all the time.--'s regiment is on the march up from Clarksburg; they signalized their entrance into the country by breaking into and robbing a grocery-store
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
but I begin to think that my successes will be due to manoeuvres, and that I shall have no brilliant victories to record. I would be glad to clear them out of West Virginia and liberate the country without bloodshed, if possible. The people are rejoiced to see us. Buckhannon, July 3. . . . We had a pleasant march of sixteebinet, including the President, are charmed with your activity, valor, and consequent success. We do not doubt that you will in due time sweep the rebels from West Virginia, but do not mean to precipitate you, as you are fast enough. Winfield Scott. . . . Our ride to-day was magnificent; some of the most splendid mountain viem almost hourly awaiting news of Cox's success in the Kanawha. Should Cox not be prompt enough I will go down there myself and bring the matter to a close. West Virginia being cleared of the enemy, I have then to reorganize and consolidate the army. The time of the three-months men is about expiring, and they form so large por
Parkersburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
tc. ad infinitum. . . . We reached here about three in the morning, and at once went on board the boat, where I got about three hours sleep until we reached Parkersburg. I have been hard at work all day, for I found everything in great confusion. Came up here in a boat about an hour ago, and shall go back to Parkersburg in twParkersburg in two or three hours. . . We start from Parkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Barker's Illinois). Two Indiana regiments leave in the morning just after us. I shall have five aParkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Barker's Illinois). Two Indiana regiments leave in the morning just after us. I shall have five additional regiments at Grafton to-morrow afternoon. I shall have some eighteen regiments two batteries, two companies of cavalry at my disposal — enough to thrash anything I find. I think the danger has been greatly exaggerated, and anticipate little or no chance of winning laurels. . . . A terrible storm is passing over us now;
Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
t work all day, for I found everything in great confusion. Came up here in a boat about an hour ago, and shall go back to Parkersburg in two or three hours. . . We start from Parkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Barker's Illinois). Two Indiana regiments leave in the morning just after us. I shall have five additional regiments at Grafton to-morrow afternoon. I shall have some eighteen regiments two batteries, two companies of cavalry at my disposal — enough to thrash anything I find. I think the danger has been greatly exaggerated, and anticipate little or no chance of winning laurels. . . . A terrible storm is passing over us now; thunder and lightning terrible in the extreme. . . . Grafton, Sunday, June 23, 1861. . . . We did not reach here until about two in the morning, and I was tired out. . . . Everything her
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
from him yesterday a despatch beginning, Your suggestion in respect to Staunton would be admirable, like your other conceptions and acts. I value that old man's praise very highly, and wrote him a short note last night telling him so. I enclose some scraps clipped off a dirty rebel flag captured at Rich Mountain. . . . Am engaged now in arranging to march home the three-months men to be reorganized, and in clearing up matters generally. . . . I suppose McDowell drove the enemy from Manassas Junction yesterday; if so the way will be pretty well cleared for the present. If any decided movement is made towards Richmond I shall feel sure that they cannot intend to trouble my people here. July 21, Beverly. . . . Were you satisfied with the result? Nine guns taken, twelve colors, lots of prisoners, and all this done with so little loss on our side! We found yesterday some more guns abandoned by Garnett, bringing the number taken up to nine. . . Gen. Cox has been badly checked i
Cheat Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
om Pegram a proposition to surrender, which I granted. L. Williams went out with an escort of cavalry and received him. He surrendered, with another colonel, some 25 officers, and 560 men. . . . I do not think the enemy in front of us in the Cheat Mountain pass, but that they have fallen back in hot haste. If they have, I will drive them out to-morrow and occupy the pass. . . . It now appears we killed nearly 200; took almost 900. . . . The valley in which we are is one of the most beautifut that some mothers and sisters and wives will bless the name of your husband. . . . Started this morning with a strong advanced guard, supported by two regiments, to test the question as to whether the rebels were really fortified in the Cheat Mountain pass. I went prepared for another fight, but found that they had scampered. We picked up some of their plunder, but they have undoubtedly gone at least to Staunton. The pass was strong, and they might have given us an immense deal of troub
Roaring Creek (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
atch from Gen. Scott last night. He said he was charmed with my energy, movements, and success. Pretty well for the old man. I hope to deserve more of him in the future. Move at six to-morrow morning to overtake advanced guard, which consists of three regiments, a battery, and one company of cavalry. I take up headquarters escort and four regiments infantry; three more follow next day. The large supply-train up and ready to move. Brig.-Gen. Garnett in command of enemy. July 10, Roaring creek. We have occupied the important position on this line without loss. The enemy are in sight, and I am about sending out a strong armed reconnoissance to feel him and see what he is. I have been looking at their camps with my glass; they are strongly entrenched, but I think I can come the Cerro Gordo over them. Telegram--Rich Mountain, July 12, 1861.--Have met with complete success; captured the enemy's entire camp, guns, tents, wagons, etc. Many prisoners, among whom several offic
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
men in getting a detachment thrashed than I did in routing two armies. The consequence is, I shall move down with a heavy column to take Mr. Wise in rear, and hope either to drive him out without a battle or to catch him with his whole force. It is absolutely necessary for me to go in person; I have no one to whom I can entrust the operation. More than that, I don't feel sure that the men will fight very well under any one but myself; they have confidence in me and will do anything that I put them at. I lose about fourteen regiments now whose term of service is about expiring, and am sorry to say that I have as yet found but few whose patriotism is sufficient to induce them to remain beyond their time. I expect to get away from here by day after to-morrow at latest. The march to the Kanawha will require about seven days. I hope to be able to start for Cincinnati in about two weeks from to-morrow. I expect the Guthrie Grays here to-day, and will take them with me to the Kanawha.
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