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George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 32
this double precaution. In order to bring troops upon ground with which they are already familiar, it would be best to move Porter's corps upon Upton's Hill, that it may occupy Hall's Hill, etc.; McDowell's to Upton's Hill; Franklin's to the works in front of Alexandria; Heintzelman's to the same vicinity; Couch to Fort Corcoran, or, if practicable, to the Chain bridge; Sumner either to Fort Albany or to Alexandria, as may be most convenient. In haste, general, very truly yours, Geo. B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. U. S. A. In a very short time I had made all the requisite preparations and was about to start to the front in person to assume command as far out as possible, when a message came to me from Gen. Halleck informing me that it was the President's order that I should not assume command until the troops had reached the immediate vicinity of the fortifications. I therefore waited until the afternoon, when I rode out to the most advanced of the detached works covering the c
urn, going to the city last night on important business requiring despatch, was stopped at this end of the bridge and had to go back to Fort Albany. On both occasions the officers of the guards, though aware of our positions, said they had no discretion. On the 30th, Assist. Adj.-Gen. Williams telegraphs Gen. Wadsworth: In the absence of orders defining the limits of his command Gen. McClellan issues a countersign to-day to the troops of the Army of the Potomac in this vicinity. It is Malvern. If yours is different he will be obliged to you to communicate it, and also to instruct the guards at the Long bridge to recognize ours. Do you know what command furnishes the guard for the Virginia end of the Long bridge? A duplicate of the first part of this same despatch was sent the same day to Gen. John P. Slough, military governor of Alexandria, where Gen. McClellan's own headquarters then were. Obviously McClellan was not at this time in command of all the troops in and about
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 32
lan, since they had been unable to persuade Mr. Lincoln to take McClellan from the army. McClellanount of this remarkable interview, in which Mr. Lincoln, with deep emotion, threw himself and the sre in contact, and each trusted the other. Mr. Lincoln then intended to give to McClellan discretino one has appreciated the state of mind of Mr. Lincoln at this appalling moment, when he realized icians against the army and its commander. Mr. Lincoln was a sagacious man. He knew thoroughly thee most remarkable ever held in Washington. Mr. Lincoln entered it knowing his men. He knew that Mrn their course — to assure the country that Mr. Lincoln was alone responsible for the ruin they beln Welles, Secretary of the Navy, in his book, Lincoln and Seward, New York, 1874, page 194, says: smissed. . . . Whatever changes of mind Mr. Lincoln, subsequently underwent may with probabilitellan's command. It is not probable that Mr. Lincoln's attention was ever called to the existenc[2 more...]
possible, when a message came to me from Gen. Halleck informing me that it was the President's order that I should not assume command until the troops had reached the immediate vicinity of the fortifications. I therefore waited until the afternoon, when I rode out to the most advanced of the detached works covering the capital. I had with me Colburn, Key, and some other aides, with a small cavalry escort, and rode at once to Munson's Hill. About the time I reached there the infantry of King's division of McDowell's corps commenced arriving, and I halted them and ordered them into position. Very soon — within twenty minutes--a regiment of cavalry appeared, marching by twos, and sandwiched in the midst were Pope and McDowell with their staff officers. I never saw a more helpless-looking headquarters. About this time rather heavy artillery-firing was heard in the distance. When these generals rode up to me and the ordinary salutations had passed, I inquired what that artillery-
J. C. Kelton (search for this): chapter 32
m said that he could not go. Then I asked that Kelton, his adjutant-general, might be sent. Kelton Kelton cheerfully offered to go, and it was determined that he should start immediately. I took Kelton to Kelton to one side and advised him not to content himself with merely seeing Pope, but also to make it a pointmy house. The President informed me that Col. Kelton had returned and represented the condition s statements, alone induced Halleck to send Col. Kelton to the front for information. The return ol's office, dated March 1, 1886, and signed J. C. Kelton, Assist. Adj.-Gen. Col. Kelton was the offAdj.-Gen. Col. Kelton was the officer on Gen. Halleck's staff who had brought the intelligence of the condition of Gen. Pope's commaonsulted with Mr. Stanton does not appear. Col. Kelton says: It appears from the records that of General Order No. 122 was written by Col. J. C. Kelton, then assistant adjutant-general, headqu Gen. Halleck, was the same day returned by Col. Kelton to Col. Townsend, amended as it now stands.
fortifications and command them for the defence of Washington. I remarked . . . that I could not but feel that giving command to him was equivalent to giving Washington to the rebels. This and more I said. . . . The President said it distressed him exceedingly to find himself differing on such a point from the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Treasury; that he would gladly resign his place; but that he could not see who could do the work wanted as well as McClellan. I named Hooker, or Sumner, or Burnside, either of whom would do the work better. Mr. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, in his book, Lincoln and Seward, New York, 1874, page 194, says: At the stated cabinet meeting on Tuesday, the 2d of Sept, while the whole community was stirred up and in confusion, and affairs were growing beyond anything that had previously occurred, Stanton entered the council-room a few moments in advance of Mr. Lincoln, and said, with great excitement, he had just learned
S. V. Heintzelman (search for this): chapter 32
a: general: Gen. Halleck instructed me to repeat to you the order he sent this morning to withdraw your army to Washington without unnecessary delay. He feared that his messenger might miss you, and desired to take this double precaution. In order to bring troops upon ground with which they are already familiar, it would be best to move Porter's corps upon Upton's Hill, that it may occupy Hall's Hill, etc.; McDowell's to Upton's Hill; Franklin's to the works in front of Alexandria; Heintzelman's to the same vicinity; Couch to Fort Corcoran, or, if practicable, to the Chain bridge; Sumner either to Fort Albany or to Alexandria, as may be most convenient. In haste, general, very truly yours, Geo. B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. U. S. A. In a very short time I had made all the requisite preparations and was about to start to the front in person to assume command as far out as possible, when a message came to me from Gen. Halleck informing me that it was the President's order that
H. Hammerstein (search for this): chapter 32
Chapter 32: Recalled to save the capital Pope defeated the President appeals to McClellan he accepts command alarm in Washington enthusiasm of the army the capital safe the order of Sept. 2 Halleck's testimony Stormy cabinet meeting. Late at night of Aug. 31, I think, Maj. Hammerstein One of my aides, whom I had sent to the front to bring me news as to the real state of affairs — returned, bringing a despatch from Pope, which was to be sent to Halleck by telegraph. The information Hammerstein brought proved that Pope's despatch was false throughout. On the 1st of Sept. I met Gen. Halleck at his office in Washington, who by verbal order directed me to take charge of Washington and its defences, but expressly prohibited me from exercising any control over the active troops under Gen. Pope. At this interview I told him what I had every reason to know to be the true state of affairs. He doubted the accuracy of my information and believed the statements
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 32
is acts on Sept. 2, that he saw and knew what Halleck did not do, and what McClellan was doing, in to writing of that command. The following is Halleck's testimony: On his [Gen. McClellan's] once. Please define my position and duties. Halleck made no reply to this; and from what followedid: I wish not to control. That I leave to Gen. Halleck, aided by your counsels. The unexplainedand responsible from Aug. 26 to Sept. 1. Gen. Halleck's verbal orders to Gen. McClellan on Sept. n, p. 415). Secretary Welles says Stanton and Halleck were filled with apprehensions beyond others.s. Gen. McClellan went swiftly to work. Gen. Halleck went to inform Secretary Stanton of the ove Now, when he heard from Mr. Stanton and Gen. Halleck that the capital was lost, and that they hathe President direct to McClellan, and that Gen. Halleck considered himself relieved from responsibi. Adj.-Gen. Col. Kelton was the officer on Gen. Halleck's staff who had brought the intelligence of[54 more...]
William B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 32
2. Maj.-Gen. John Pope, Commanding Army of Virginia: general: Gen. Halleck instructed me to repeat to you the order he sent this morning to withdraw your army to Washington without unnecessary delay. He feared that his messenger might miss you, and desired to take this double precaution. In order to bring troops upon ground with which they are already familiar, it would be best to move Porter's corps upon Upton's Hill, that it may occupy Hall's Hill, etc.; McDowell's to Upton's Hill; Franklin's to the works in front of Alexandria; Heintzelman's to the same vicinity; Couch to Fort Corcoran, or, if practicable, to the Chain bridge; Sumner either to Fort Albany or to Alexandria, as may be most convenient. In haste, general, very truly yours, Geo. B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. U. S. A. In a very short time I had made all the requisite preparations and was about to start to the front in person to assume command as far out as possible, when a message came to me from Gen. Halleck inf
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