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n support of Speaker Gully yesterday? -- That is Farquharson, of Aberdeen. That light-haired young man is Allen, of Newcastle. The gentleman on the upper bench is Sir E. Gourley, of Sunderland; and the one opposite, on the other bench, is Herbert Gladstone. But it is unnecessary to go further, you will understand his method. He pointed out quite two-score of people, with some distinctive remark about each. It was two or three minutes past twelve. A hush fell on the House, the doors were his verbiage serves as a shelter, until they can catch the idea they are groping for. I wanted some such shelter badly, for it requires a strong effort to marshal out your ideas and facts, so that there shall be no awkward break in the speech. Gladstone used to shelter to excess; he circumvented, to a weary length; and often required more than one sentence before he could muster courage to approach the fact. Well! I have not got the art! First, I have not the patience; and, then, again, I
e-hall, where I found the Members had begun to gather. One came to me with level eyes, and was about to indulge in an ejaculation, when I said, I almost think I know you by your look. You can't be O'Kelly? He softened, and answered Yes, --upon which, of course, I expressed my surprise that this stout figure could be the slim young man I knew in Madrid, twenty-three years ago. At that time he had just been released from a Cuban prison, and had been sent to Spain by the Cuban authorities. Sickles, the American Minister, obtained his release on parole. Now, here he stood, transformed into an elderly legislator! I gently chaffed him that, knowing I had been in London so many years, he had never sought my acquaintance. Tell me, honestly, I said, was it not because you had become such an important public man? It confused him a little, but O'Kelly and I were always pretty direct with each other. Just near me was the worthy Kimber of Wandsworth. I turned to him, and said, Now come,
ose it was he — read in a much clearer voice some message to the effect that we could proceed to elect a Speaker. When he concluded, he and his three friends took off their hats; at which we retired, betaking ourselves to our own House through the long passage by which we had left. I met many friends, but I have not been able to exchange twelve sensible words with any of them except Mr. Charles Darling, Q. C., M. P., Now Sir Charles Darling, Judge in the King's Bench Division. and Colonel Denny, M. P. All the rest appear to be in a perfect fever. They no sooner grasp your hand and pour out congratulations than they turn away to another person, and, during their glib greetings, keep looking away to someone else. I searched the faces on the Radical benches to see if I recognised John Burns and James J. O'Kelly. I would not be sure of O'Kelly, because he is so different from the slim young man I knew in Madrid in 1873--twenty-three years ago. It is too early yet to say whe
Balfour came next, with a long speech, which was undoubtedly a relief. Sir Charles Dilke jumped up after Balfour, and he seemed to me to come nearer to what I hadWith the sweet voice of Balfour, his own composure and self-possession, I think Dilke would have been superior to all. Mr. Seton-Karr was also excellent. Matter,se, of Harcourt; the deprecating manner of Balfour; the professional gravity of Dilke, were so opposite to the gage-throwing style of Haldane. He is a combatant, anousness, command of words, and easy, composed bearing, he deserves to rank with Dilke. But the sibilancy of his words distracts the ear, and that is a pity. He can a legitimate excuse for my rising to deliver a few remarks, in answer to Sir Charles Dilke. I see those remarks are called my Maiden Speech, but as I made no prepat such a time. Even the old Members are not always happy. Well, after Sir Charles Dilke sat down, our friend James Bryce rose, who, I must admit, speaks fluently
not flow so smoothly out of his lips as they may have coursed through his mind! If he is a new Member, he is a pitiable object at such a time. Even the old Members are not always happy. Well, after Sir Charles Dilke sat down, our friend James Bryce rose, who, I must admit, speaks fluently, as well he might, with his great experience as a Lecturer, Member, and Minister. I do not think he is at all nervous; at least, I should not judge him to be so from his manner. After him, rose Mr. McKenna to ask about Siam. I had made a little move, but I was too late, having not quite concluded in my own mind that I ought to speak. When he finished, Commander Bethell had the floor. These old Members shoot to their feet with a sudden spring, like Jack-in-the-Box. He spoke upon Egypt and the new countries of Central Africa like one desirous of obtaining information upon matters which puzzled him. Parker Smith, sitting beside me, was on his feet in an instant; but what he said seeme
in which I cannot help seeing a great deal of degradation. The criminal waste of precious time, devotion to antique customs, the silent endurance of evils, which, by a word, could be swept away, have afforded me much matter of wonder. There are Irish M. P.'s who must feel amply rewarded, in knowing that, through sheer excess of impudence only, they can condemn so many hundreds of their betters to bend servilely to their behests! At many of the divisions, I have been almost smothered by Hicks-Beach, the Marquis of Lorne, Austin Chamberlain, Arthur Balfour, Tom Ellis, Arnold-Forster, Henry Chaplin, George Curzon, Lord Compton, Sydney Gedge, Lord Dalkeith, Coningsby Disraeli, and scores of great land-owners and others; temperature in the nineties. While, on the other side of our cage, stood Tim Healy in the cool hall, smiling inwardly at this servility on the part of so many noble and worthy men! But, if I pity this dumb helplessness of our great Majority, and marvel at its mee
hree hundred and fifty Members for eleven hours, must needs be vitiated. We are herded in the lobbies like so many sheep in a fold; and, among my wonders, has been that such a number of eminent men could consent voluntarily to such a servitude, in which I cannot help seeing a great deal of degradation. The criminal waste of precious time, devotion to antique customs, the silent endurance of evils, which, by a word, could be swept away, have afforded me much matter of wonder. There are Irish M. P.'s who must feel amply rewarded, in knowing that, through sheer excess of impudence only, they can condemn so many hundreds of their betters to bend servilely to their behests! At many of the divisions, I have been almost smothered by Hicks-Beach, the Marquis of Lorne, Austin Chamberlain, Arthur Balfour, Tom Ellis, Arnold-Forster, Henry Chaplin, George Curzon, Lord Compton, Sydney Gedge, Lord Dalkeith, Coningsby Disraeli, and scores of great land-owners and others; temperature in the n
friends took off their hats; at which we retired, betaking ourselves to our own House through the long passage by which we had left. I met many friends, but I have not been able to exchange twelve sensible words with any of them except Mr. Charles Darling, Q. C., M. P., Now Sir Charles Darling, Judge in the King's Bench Division. and Colonel Denny, M. P. All the rest appear to be in a perfect fever. They no sooner grasp your hand and pour out congratulations than they turn away to anothSir Charles Darling, Judge in the King's Bench Division. and Colonel Denny, M. P. All the rest appear to be in a perfect fever. They no sooner grasp your hand and pour out congratulations than they turn away to another person, and, during their glib greetings, keep looking away to someone else. I searched the faces on the Radical benches to see if I recognised John Burns and James J. O'Kelly. I would not be sure of O'Kelly, because he is so different from the slim young man I knew in Madrid in 1873--twenty-three years ago. It is too early yet to say whether I shall like the House or not. If there is much behaviour like that of Dr. Tanner in it, I shall not; but it is ominous to me that the man can b
of precious time, devotion to antique customs, the silent endurance of evils, which, by a word, could be swept away, have afforded me much matter of wonder. There are Irish M. P.'s who must feel amply rewarded, in knowing that, through sheer excess of impudence only, they can condemn so many hundreds of their betters to bend servilely to their behests! At many of the divisions, I have been almost smothered by Hicks-Beach, the Marquis of Lorne, Austin Chamberlain, Arthur Balfour, Tom Ellis, Arnold-Forster, Henry Chaplin, George Curzon, Lord Compton, Sydney Gedge, Lord Dalkeith, Coningsby Disraeli, and scores of great land-owners and others; temperature in the nineties. While, on the other side of our cage, stood Tim Healy in the cool hall, smiling inwardly at this servility on the part of so many noble and worthy men! But, if I pity this dumb helplessness of our great Majority, and marvel at its meek submissiveness to the wholly unnecessary, I pity still more that solitary figure
ony was sweetly simple, yet it moved me; and, in my heart, I honoured every Member the more for it. I thought of Solomon's beautiful Prayer for Understanding, and the object of these supplications was for assistance in the right doing of the legislative work before the House. The Speaker has grown sensibly, in my estimation, since the first day when he sat in the ranks, on the Radical benches. Then he appeared a clever, legal-looking member, of somewhat high colour, a veritable Pleydell (Scott's Guy Mannering ). Though I have seen him in his process of transformation into the First Commoner, I was not quite prepared for this increased respect. I suppose the form and ceremony attending his coming and going, the ready obedience and respect of every Member and official, have somewhat to do with my conversion. I feel as if we were going to be proud of him. The seconder of the Address was our friend Robertson, of Hackney, who was in Court dress. He spoke well, but wandered discu
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