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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
rish expenses were as follows: In 1825, $1,208.16; in 1830, $1,235.35; in 1840, $1,701.24 ; in 1845, $2,348.01; in 1850, $1,523.21. The change of the law in Massachusetts respecting the support of ministers, and the consequent change of action in some parishes, had produced fatal results. One statute provides thus: No person shvolution, his agent could not deliver the cup without legislative authority. The following public document will sufficiently explain itself:-- Commonwealth of Massachusetts.in Senate, Oct. 26, 1781. On the petition of David Osgood, pastor of the church of Christ in Medford, in behalf of said church:-- Resolved, That,the grief of the church. A society was formed to act in concert with the church; and was incorporated, under the general act of incorporation of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, May 29, 1842, on application of Moses Parsons, Lewis C. Sorntas, Robert L. Ells, William Parsons, and others. Many inconveniences were experienced
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Ware, Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Dr. Foster, Brighton; Rev. Thomas B. Gannett, Cambridgeport; Rev. Bernard Whitman, Waltham; Rev. Charles Briggs, Lexington; Rev. Edward B. Hall, Northampton; Rev. Ira H. T. Blanchard, Harvard. In the organization of the council, Rev. President Kirkland was chosen Moderator; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Scribe. After the usual religious services, the council examined the doings of the church and congregation relative to the dissolution of the pastoral relation of Rev. Andrew Bigelow, and found them regular. They next examined the doings of the church and congregation relative to the call of Mr. Stetson, and found them satisfactory; whereupon
Accomack (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
public worship in said parish the present year. This temporary and precarious provision for the support of God's worship and the spread of Christianity does not sound much like those iron-bound resolves of our pious ancestors, wherein life and property were for ever dedicated to God and to his church. Whether the voluntary system, as adopted in New England, is or is not a failure, is with some no longer a question. April 9, 1849: Voted, unanimously, to give Rev. George W. Briggs, of Plymouth, an invitation to settle with us as our minister in the gospel. $1,200 salary. April 15, Mr. Briggs communicated his refusal in a short and satisfactory letter. June 11, 1849: Voted that the parish vote by yeas and nays on the motion to extend an invitation to the Rev. John Pierpont to settle with them in the ministry for one year, with a salary of one thousand dollars,--provided the connection be dissolved on either side by giving a previous notice of six months. Yeas, 25; nays, 24.
Mystic River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
r, Brighton; Dr. Charles Lowell, Boston; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Dr. Aaron Bancroft, Worcester; Dr. Ezra Ripley, Concord; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Hinghtheir delegates: Rev. Dr. Kirkland and Dr. Ware, Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev twelve or fifteen individuals, members of that denomination, connected either with a church in Charlestown or the one in Malden, were accustomed to meet each week and hold a class-meeting, which was conducted by one of their number who had been appointed leader. During the winter of 1843-4, Rev. J. W. Whitman, stationed at Malden, and whose circuit included this town also, preached several times, in a small building, to attentive congregations; and, the Holy Spirit accompanying his earnest e
Hingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
er, Brighton; Dr. Charles Lowell, Boston; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Dr. Aaron Bancroft, Worcester; Dr. Ezra Ripley, Concord; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham. The council met on this day. Rev. Dr. Ripley, Moderator; and Rev. Mr. Francis, Scribe. After all the doings of the town and church relating to the call of Mr. Bigelow had been considered, and all other requisite inquiries had been made and . Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Dr. Foster, Brighton; Rev. Thomas B. Gannett, Cambridgeport; Rev. Bernard Whitman, Waltham; Rev. Charles Briggs, Lexington; Rev. Edward B. Hall, Northampton; Rev. Ira H. T. Blanchard, Harvard. In the organizatio
Somerset, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
tinued but a few months in this relation, leaving the people again destitute of an under-shepherd. Some months now elapsed; when Mr. G. F. Danforth, a graduate of New Hampden, N. H., was called, publicly ordained, and installed as pastor. Rev. Mr. Danforth resigned his pastoral relation after the brief period of little more than a year. A destitution of some months followed, when the people again succeeded in calling a minister to supply the sacred desk; and the Rev. E. K. Fuller, of Somerset, Mass., was invited to fill the sacred office. Rev. Mr. Fuller commenced his labors on the 1st of April, 1849, and continued his work, with much success, until April 1, 1854,--a period of five years. Notwithstanding the too frequent changes in the pastoral relation, it has been the good fortune of this church and society to enjoy its full share of increase and prosperity. Since its organization, two new societies of the Protestant faith have been formed in Medford, and two new churches ha
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
l Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Thaddeus Fiske, West Cambridge; Dr. John Foster, Brighton; Dr. Charles Lowell, Boston; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Dr. Aaron Bancroft, Worcester; Dr. Ezra Ripley, Concord; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham. The ces: Rev. Dr. Kirkland and Dr. Ware, Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Br 1843, no Methodist Episcopal church existed in this place. Some twelve or fifteen individuals, members of that denomination, connected either with a church in Charlestown or the one in Malden, were accustomed to meet each week and hold a class-meeting, which was conducted by one of their number who had been appointed leader. D
Waltham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Dr. Foster, Brighton; Rev. Thomas B. Gannett, Cambridgeport; Rev. Bernard Whitman, Waltham; Rev. Charles Briggs, Lexington; Rev. Edward B. Hall, Northampton;Waltham; Rev. Charles Briggs, Lexington; Rev. Edward B. Hall, Northampton; Rev. Ira H. T. Blanchard, Harvard. In the organization of the council, Rev. President Kirkland was chosen Moderator; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Scribe. After the usual religious services, the council examined the doings of the church and congregation relative to the dissolution of the pastoral relation of Rev. Andrew Bigelow, and found them regular. They next examined the doings of the church and congregation relative to the call of Mr. Stetson, and found them satisfactory; whereupon they v
David Osgood (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 7: ecclesiastical history (continued). First parish. after the death of Dr. Osgood, the eyes of so many were turned upon the Rev. Andrew Bigelow, that the Committee engaged him, March fession; the properties of being liberal and practical, yet deeply serious and evangelical. Dr. Osgood gave by will some valuable books to the church, for the use of his successors in the ministry ate of Isaac Royal, Esq., an absentee, the silver cup mentioned in the above order of court. David Osgood. By a resolve of the church, in 1824, the pewter dish was sold, and a silver one purchas 11, 1713.DiedJan. 23, 1722. Rev. Ebenezer Turell,SettledNov. 25, 1724.DiedDec. 8, 1778. Rev. David Osgood.SettledSept. 14, 1774.DiedDec. 12, 1822. Rev. Andrew Bigelow,SettledJuly 9, 1823.Resignedl prosperity. Second Congregational Society. Early in June, 1823, after the death of Rev. David Osgood, and soon after the settlement of Rev. Andrew Bigelow as pastor of the first church, it ap
Sagamore John (search for this): chapter 8
regret of his people that any circumstances should, in his opinion, have made a separation from them desirable. He left behind him many aching hearts, and many warm friends, who will not forget how he labored among them as a good minister of Jesus Christ in all faithfulness and love. Mr. Bigelow baptized 66 persons; married 37 couples; officiated at 105 funerals; and admitted 26 communicants to the church. The parish-committee, consisting of Messrs. John Symmes, Jonathan Brooks, and John King, engage Mr. Caleb Stetson, a graduate of Harvard College in 1822, to preach as a candidate for five sabbaths. At the close of his engagement, the parish passed the following votes :-- Jan. 8, 1827: Voted unanimously to give Mr. Caleb Stetson an invitation to settle with us as our minister in the gospel. Voted unanimously to give Mr. Stetson one thousand dollars salary. Voted to give Mr. Stetson one thousand dollars over and above his salary, to be paid on the day of his settl
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