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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
in the summer of 1841, when a church was formed, consisting of twelve members; and George W. Bosworth, a graduate of the Newton Theological Institution, was invited to become its pastor. A council of delegates from neighboring Baptist churches was convened, Sept. 8, 1841, in the vestry of the Second Congregational meeting-house. After due organization, the council proceeded to examine the articles of faith and covenant of the church; which were found to be substantially the same as the New Hampshire articles, so called, and such as are generally adopted by the regular Calvinistic Baptist churches in New England. The council then proceeded to examine the pastor elect; and, after a brief adjournment, the public services of recognizing the church were performed. At the same time, and by the above-named council, George W. Bosworth was publicly ordained to the work of the gospel ministry. Rev. Mr. Bosworth labored in his infant church, with great acceptance and success, for nearly fiv
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
parish paid the proprietors of pews in the old meeting-house $1,260, and received for said house $260. That the new house was larger than was needed, was a common impression; but the time may come when it will be crowded. It was solemnly dedicated to the worship of God and the promulgation of Christianity on Wednesday, the 4th of December, 1839. The exercises were: Introductory prayer, by Rev. Nathaniel Hall, of Dorchester; selection from the Scriptures, by Rev. Edward B. Hall, of Providence, R. I.; prayer of dedication, by Rev. Convers Francis, D. D., of Watertown; sermon, by Rev. Caleb Stetson; concluding prayer, by Rev. N. L. Frothingham, of Boston. It was the intention of the pastor and people that the original hymns and all the public religious services (except the sermon) should have been furnished, as the record says, by children of this society. It would have been so, had not the writer of this history been absent with his family in Europe. The preacher took 1 Cor. I
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
; work on the grounds, &c., $195.69; making a sum total of $13,797.63. The parish paid the proprietors of pews in the old meeting-house $1,260, and received for said house $260. That the new house was larger than was needed, was a common impression; but the time may come when it will be crowded. It was solemnly dedicated to the worship of God and the promulgation of Christianity on Wednesday, the 4th of December, 1839. The exercises were: Introductory prayer, by Rev. Nathaniel Hall, of Dorchester; selection from the Scriptures, by Rev. Edward B. Hall, of Providence, R. I.; prayer of dedication, by Rev. Convers Francis, D. D., of Watertown; sermon, by Rev. Caleb Stetson; concluding prayer, by Rev. N. L. Frothingham, of Boston. It was the intention of the pastor and people that the original hymns and all the public religious services (except the sermon) should have been furnished, as the record says, by children of this society. It would have been so, had not the writer of this his
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
usness, nor Christian devotion to freeze into formalism. According to the New England usage, the pews were sold at auction, after a committee had apportioned upon now in use for Rev. Mr. Greenwood's selection. There are few parishes in New England which have had no trouble with their Sunday choir. Singers are dangerously cated to God and to his church. Whether the voluntary system, as adopted in New England, is or is not a failure, is with some no longer a question. April 9, 1849cular history closes. Since 1820, Sunday schools have multiplied greatly in New England, and books and manuals for them have abounded. The first parish early folloso deep has grown the interest in Sunday schools and in the other schools of New England, that ours is called the children's age. It was believed they were needed, such as are generally adopted by the regular Calvinistic Baptist churches in New England. The council then proceeded to examine the pastor elect; and, after a brief
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
e council was composed of the following clergymen, with their delegates: Rev. Dr. Kirkland and Dr. Ware, Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Dr. Foster, Brighton; Rev. Thomas B. Gannett, Cambridgeport; Rev. Bernard Whitman, Waltham; Rev. Charles Briggs, Lexington; Rev. Edward B. Hall, Northampton; Rev. Ira H. T. Blanchard, Harvard. In the organization of the council, Rev. President Kirkland was chosen Moderator; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Scribe. After the usual religious services, the council examined the doings of the church and congregation relative to the dissolution of the pastoral relation of Rev. Andrew Bigelow, and found them regular. They next examined the doings of the ch
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the church and congregation in this town. The religious exercises were in the following order: Introductory prayer, by Rev. Charles Brooks; sermon, by Rev. Dr. Bancroft; prayer of installation, by Rev. Dr. Holmes; charge, by Rev. Dr. Ripley; right hand of fellow-ship, by Rev. James Walker; concluding prayer, by Rev. Convers Francis; benediction, by the pastor. These several services (the prayers excepted) were published together by a vote of the parish. Mr. Bigelow was born in Groton, Mass., May 7, 1795, and graduated at Harvard College 1814. After studying law for a short time, he turned with his whole soul to the study of divinity, and spent some time at Edinburgh, Scotland. May, 1820, he was ordained as an evangelist, and labored with zeal and success at Eastport, Maine, and at Gloucester, Mass.; from which last place he married Miss Amelia Sargent Stanwood. Coming with reputation and experience to the work of the ministry in Medford, he did all that could be done fo
Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
wn and church to install the pastor elect, was composed of the following clergymen, with delegates: President Kirkland, Cambridge; Dr. Abiel Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Thaddeus Fiske, West Cambridge; Dr. John Foster, Brighton; Dr. Charles Lowell, BostonCambridge; Dr. Thaddeus Fiske, West Cambridge; Dr. John Foster, Brighton; Dr. Charles Lowell, Boston; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Dr. Aaron Bancroft, Worcester; Dr. Ezra Ripley, Concord; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; and Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham. The council met on this day. Res ordained. The council was composed of the following clergymen, with their delegates: Rev. Dr. Kirkland and Dr. Ware, Cambridge; Dr. Holmes, Cambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, CharCambridge; Dr. Lowell, Boston; Rev. Aaron Greene, Malden; Rev. Henry Ware, Boston; Rev. James Walker, Charlestown; Rev. Convers Francis, Watertown; Rev. Joseph Field, Weston; Rev. George Ripley, Boston; Rev. Samuel Ripley, Waltham; Dr. Fiske, West Cambridge; Rev. Charles Brooks, Hingham; Rev. Francis Parkman, Boston; Dr. Foster, Brighton; Rev. Thomas B.
Andover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
nd you, and all his people, may glorify him with that holiness which becomes his house for ever. On the 20th of June, 1823, a public meeting was held, and a new society formed, called The second Congregational Society of Medford. After the following sabbath, the members of the new society fitted up a hall in the neighborhood as a temporary place of worship, and their members gradually increased. Their pulpit was supplied by neighboring clergymen, and from the Theological Seminary in Andover, till Oct. 2; when seventeen members from the first church, with nine members of other churches who had removed lately to Medford, bringing with them letters of dismission, were organized into a church by an ecclesiastical council, of which Rev. William Greenough, of Newton, was chosen Moderator; and Rev. B. B. Wisner, of Boston, Scribe. The names of the original members were as follows (the seventeen first mentioned coming from the first church of Medford, the others from abroad):--
Eastport (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Walker; concluding prayer, by Rev. Convers Francis; benediction, by the pastor. These several services (the prayers excepted) were published together by a vote of the parish. Mr. Bigelow was born in Groton, Mass., May 7, 1795, and graduated at Harvard College 1814. After studying law for a short time, he turned with his whole soul to the study of divinity, and spent some time at Edinburgh, Scotland. May, 1820, he was ordained as an evangelist, and labored with zeal and success at Eastport, Maine, and at Gloucester, Mass.; from which last place he married Miss Amelia Sargent Stanwood. Coming with reputation and experience to the work of the ministry in Medford, he did all that could be done for making the divided waters mingle in peace; but, as irreconcilable differences of opinion were developed in the congregation, it was best that the dissentients should quietly withdraw, and provide for themselves a separate and satisfactory ministration of the word. The first step in su
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ting and sending the following letter:-- Medford, Aug. 25, 1823. Reverend and Beloved,--It m all connection with the primitive church of Medford. So far as the records speak, we find nothineen minister and people. The first parish in Medford felt somewhat the flux and reflux of the trou be considered members of the first parish in Medford for the present year, do hereby agree to pay t to become the pastor of the first parish of Medford, and install him in that office. Voted thaonel Royal gave a silver cup to the church in Medford; but, he being an absentee, suspected of not , called The second Congregational Society of Medford. After the following sabbath, the members ofsixty in number, to form the Mystic church of Medford, now a flourishing society. Mr. Baker, aft The origin of the first Baptist Society in Medford was in the summer of 1840, when a number of pl church was first used in public worship, in Medford, on Christmas Eve, A. D. 1847. About the sam[19 more...]
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