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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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t Petersburg, to be placed in position against Grant's attack The development of the use of earneer Corps. General John Gross Barnard was General Grant's chief of engineers in the East. The acc Bragg, attacking Constructing gabions for Grant's attack on Petersburg The basket-like objee Federal army before it could be relieved. Grant attacked Bragg to drive him off. Hooker was surmy, being checked before the heavy trenches. Grant ordered Thomas' men to take the works at the fral defeat at Chickamauga, it is reported that Grant feared that the men of Thomas' army could not ascended. Seeing the line disobeying orders, Grant turned to Thomas, who was near, and inquired bept the gallant men of both sides who fell. Grant went East, turning over the command of the Wes final campaign started from the Rapidan under Grant, in 1864. We already have noted how, in the Wigns of the war was tremendous. The losses in Grant's army from the time he crossed the Rapidan un[4 more...]
works seriously. A wholesome respect had grown for hasty entrenchments. The dirt-diggers were coming to the front. The defensive warfare carried on to the end by the Confederates in the West placed them most of the time behind their temporary or semi-permanent works. All the forts along the Mississippi were, necessarily, of the strongest character, assuming the importance of permanent fortifications, armed with heavy guns and manned by small permanent garrisons and, during Grant's and Banks' campaigns, by larger garrisons, pushed in from the field. All of these stronger places had to be taken by the process of regular siege. When Bragg retired from Murfreesboro, he entrenched several lines between that place and Chattanooga, but Rosecrans, by consummate strategic skill, turned him out of all of them without fighting serious battles. On the battlefield of Chickamauga, the infantry and artillery of Thomas' wing of the Federal army stood like a rock behind entrenchments and b
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 11
ding to Corinth, Mississippi, a distance of at least twenty miles, and then prepared for a regular siege of the latter place, where his army outnumbered that of Beauregard about two to one. His approach took a month, at the end of which time Beauregard evacuated Corinth without loss. This cautious advance marked the first use Beauregard evacuated Corinth without loss. This cautious advance marked the first use of Confederate artillery at Vicksburg. The natural fortifications around Vicksburg rendered it wellnigh impregnable, and it was made completely so by S. H. Lockett, chief engineer of the defenses under General Pemberton. Only starvation finally reduced the beleaguered force. In two unsuccessful assaults thousands of Feet, but behind the breaches rose many feet of gabions filled with earth. These were replaced as fast as the guns of the fleet dislodged the soft earth. General G. T. Beauregard wrote in his official report of February 8, 1863: The introduction of heavy rifled guns and iron-clad steamers in the attack of masonry forts has greatly
force. In two unsuccessful assaults thousands of Federal soldiers were shot down. An instance of the spirit in which Americans fight is related by Lieutenant Roswell Henry Mason, who led his company of the Seventy-second Illinois Infantry into the principle that already had been demonstrated was again shown to be true--one American in the trench was worth several Americans outside — for all Americans are intrinsically equal. While these stirring events of the East were occurring, SchofieAmericans are intrinsically equal. While these stirring events of the East were occurring, Schofield at Franklin, Tennessee, attacked by Hood, proved again that the increasing faith in hasty field-works was not ill Fort Sedgwick. Although the Union Fort Sedgwick before Petersburg was not as elaborate a piece of engineering as the bastion himself. Had the conditions been reversed, Hood's army would probably have done as well as Schofield's. They were all Americans of the same intrinsic quality. One force was behind breastworks, slight as they were, and the other was the assaulting
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 11
for the Peninsula, and Manassas was evacuated immediately. The quaker guns were still in position when the Federals took possession of the Manassas works. When McClellan arrived on the Peninsula, he found that the Confederates were there ahead of him in sufficient force to place works across from Yorktown, utilizing, in a large m country and the formikleble nature of these artificial defenses are remembered. Practically every foot of the way from Ringgold to Atlanta was entrenched. McClellan's army was delayed a month before the Confederates evacuated. The preliminary reconnaissances by the Federal engineers persuaded McClellan that a regular siegMcClellan that a regular siege of Yorktown was necessary, and accordingly strong works were erected opposite those of the Confederates. Emplacements for heavy guns and parapets to protect them were pushed to completion. Regular siege-works, consisting of parallels and approaches, were projected. The Confederates held the position until the last moment, and
American Civil War. Even at that time, General Sherman expressed his belief that earthworks, andll to the Atlanta fort: picket fences to stop Sherman's attack Picket fences with shaped and molve been utilized by the Confederates to delay Sherman's men for that fatal instant which loses manyans have declared that no clear conception of Sherman's remarkable campaign to Atlanta can be had uifications at Allatoona pass, Georgia When Sherman's army passed this point — early in June, 186s known to be somewhere in the vicinity. General Sherman said that the reason for the lack of fielooker was successful at Lookout Mountain, but Sherman did not make any headway against the right of the command of the Western Federal armies to Sherman, who prepared to attack Johnston, entrenched ront of which lighter lines had been placed. Sherman felt this position, found it almost impregnabar. It was not until February 17, 1865, after Sherman's great march, that the Fort was evacuated. [1 more...]
id. As a matter of fact, the value of them was not realized by anyone, except that it was known, of course, that heavy works were capable of withstanding an attacking body several times the strength of the defending force. But, after Shiloh, Halleck took command and erected earthworks nearly every foot of the way from Pittsburg Landing to Corinth, Mississippi, a distance of at least twenty miles, and then prepared for a regular siege of the latter place, where his army outnumbered that of Bbehind Vicksburg: where Grant's army was held for over six weeks entrenchments at every halt. In at least two of the great battles during the preceding period of the war — Bull Run and Shiloh — no entrenchments to speak of had been used. Now, Halleck, going to the extreme in the other direction, lost valuable time constructing trenches for which a little effort at reconnaissance would have told him there was no use. With such good preliminary preparation we should be prepared to see field-fo
Daniel Phineas Woodbury (search for this): chapter 11
a high point of efficiency. On the Peninsula a brigade, consisting of the Fifteenth and Fiftieth New York Volunteer Engineers, was commanded by Brigadier-General Daniel Phineas Woodbury, a West Point graduate of the class of 1836, and a captain of engineersat the outbreak of the war. In the Peninsula campaign the engineers were afortification and building bridges. Woodbury's Bridge across the Chickahominy did notable service. Gallant and meritorious conduct in this campaign secured General Woodbury the rank of colonel in the United States Army. At Fredericksburg similar service connected with the work of the pontoon trains brought for him the rank of brigadier-general. He was brevetted major-general August 15, 1864. Fighting with sharpened sticks — primitive but effective protection Major-General D. P. Woodbury: the engineer who built the pontoon bridges at Fredericksburg had been driven in by Jackson's flank march and attack. At Gettysburg, the Army of the Potomac ma
Henry C. Foster (search for this): chapter 11
it almost impregnable, made a flank movement, and turned Johnston out of his stronghold. In the retaining attack on the works, the Federal troops took a portion of the lower lines of entrenchments, but found the upper works too strong. The turning movement having succeeded, the Union troops withdrew from the front, and Johnston retired to Saps at Vicksburg. In the center rises Coonskin Tower, a lookout and station for sharpshooters. It was built under the direction of Lieutenant Henry C. Foster of the Twenty-third Indiana Infantry. In honor of his raccoon-fur cap, the soldiers nicknamed him Coonskin. The sap-roller, shown in the illustration below, was used for construction of a sap or trench extending toward the defenders' works in a siege. A famous sap appears in the upper photograph — that built by Logan's busy men, winding its way toward the strong redan of the veteran Third Louisiana Regiment on the Jackson Road. First a parallel is opened — that is, a trench is c
S. H. Lockett (search for this): chapter 11
nding to Corinth, Mississippi, a distance of at least twenty miles, and then prepared for a regular siege of the latter place, where his army outnumbered that of Beauregard about two to one. His approach took a month, at the end of which time Beauregard evacuated Corinth without loss. This cautious advance marked the first use of Confederate artillery at Vicksburg. The natural fortifications around Vicksburg rendered it wellnigh impregnable, and it was made completely so by S. H. Lockett, chief engineer of the defenses under General Pemberton. Only starvation finally reduced the beleaguered force. In two unsuccessful assaults thousands of Federal soldiers were shot down. An instance of the spirit in which Americans fight is related by Lieutenant Roswell Henry Mason, who led his company of the Seventy-second Illinois Infantry into the city. The soldiers started in with three full days' rations in their haversacks. The gaunt and hungry Confederates lined the road on e
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