hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 172 0 Browse Search
Grant 96 20 Browse Search
United States (United States) 92 0 Browse Search
Stephen D. Lee 85 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 78 0 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
Sherman 66 6 Browse Search
John Pope 63 1 Browse Search
Herman Haupt 58 2 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 53 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 306 total hits in 86 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Roswell Henry Mason (search for this): chapter 11
he defenses under General Pemberton. Only starvation finally reduced the beleaguered force. In two unsuccessful assaults thousands of Federal soldiers were shot down. An instance of the spirit in which Americans fight is related by Lieutenant Roswell Henry Mason, who led his company of the Seventy-second Illinois Infantry into the city. The soldiers started in with three full days' rations in their haversacks. The gaunt and hungry Confederates lined the road on either side. Hey, Yank, throw us a hardtack, they called; or Hey, Yank, chuck us a piece of bacon. When Mason's company halted in the city not a haversack contained a morsel of food. A Confederate water battery that defended Vicksburg Confederate works behind Vicksburg: where Grant's army was held for over six weeks entrenchments at every halt. In at least two of the great battles during the preceding period of the war — Bull Run and Shiloh — no entrenchments to speak of had been used. Now, Halleck, going to th
O. E. Hunt (search for this): chapter 11
Entrenchments and fortifications O. E. Hunt, Captain, United States Army Confederate abatis-collected at Petersburg, to be placed in position against Grant's attack The development of the use of earthworks in war between civilized nations has been due to the adoption and increase of power of long-range firearms. The introduction of the breech-loading rifle, of comparatively recent date, has served to give a still greater impetus to the subject of fieldworks for the protection of the forces engaged, and to-day the spade is second in importance only to the rifle. Hasty entrenchments, as they are known by soldiers, were first used largely in the American Civil War. Even at that time, General Sherman expressed his belief that earthworks, and especially field-works, were destined to play a conspicuous part in all future wars, since they enabled a force to hold in check a superior one for a time, and time is a valuable element in all military operations. At the beg
battlefield of Chickamauga, the infantry and artillery of Thomas' wing of the Federal army stood like a rock behind entrency, being checked before the heavy trenches. Grant ordered Thomas' men to take the works at the foot of Missionary Ridge andckamauga, it is reported that Grant feared that the men of Thomas' army could not be trusted to stand under heavy pressure, ended. Seeing the line disobeying orders, Grant turned to Thomas, who was near, and inquired by whose orders the men had gone beyond the foot of the mountain, to which Thomas is said to have replied, By their own, I think. Grant's rejoinder was: ill suffer for this. The works at the top were heavy; but Thomas' troops succeeded, and no one suffered except the gallant the other was the assaulting party. Again, at Nashville, Thomas and Hood contended on equal terms behind their respective lines, but when Thomas became sufficiently strong he was able to drive Hood out of his works and then defeat him, as he did,
Antietam Lee (search for this): chapter 11
ts. The former schools of military teaching still showed their effects. In the campaign between Lee and Pope, in 1862, but little use was made of field-works, and at Antietam Lee fortified only a pAntietam Lee fortified only a part of his line, though strictly on the defensive. But Antietam evidently taught the lesson anew, for we find that same Confederate army at Fredericksburg with lines that defied the efforts of the asrginia, we find that, at Chancellorsville, Hooker lost precious time by stopping, after attaining Lee's flank, and entrenching, instead of making an immediate attack; and another entrenched line — thfinal operation in front of Petersburg. To meet the continuously extending left of the Federals, Lee's lines became dangerously thin, and he had to evacuate his works. He was not driven out by the at the famous Crater, but were never carried in a front attack till the final assault after which Lee withdrew. and Charleston. These were all elaborate and designed to sustain sieges and assaults
remarked that no clear conception of the remarkable campaign to Atlanta can be had unless the difficult character of the country and the formidable nature of these artificial defenses are remembered. Returning to the armies of the Potomac and of Northern Virginia, we find that, at Chancellorsville, Hooker lost precious time by stopping, after attaining Lee's flank, and entrenching, instead of making an immediate attack; and another entrenched line — this time of value — was taken up after Howard Engineers. For its murderous artillery fire every dawn and dusk during the nine months siege of Petersburg, Union Fort Sedgwick was named by the Confederates Fort Hell. It was located some three miles south of Fort McGilvery on the southern end of the inner line of Federal entrenchments, east of Petersburg. Hell feared invasion in this instance, as the bristling row of slender sharpened sticks planted in the salient witnesses. They were simply light palisades, held by putting p
ant Roswell Henry Mason, who led his company of the Seventy-second Illinois Infantry into the city. The soldiers started in with three full days' rations in their haversacks. The gaunt and hungry Confederates lined the road on either side. Hey, Yank, throw us a hardtack, they called; or Hey, Yank, chuck us a piece of bacon. When Mason's company halted in the city not a haversack contained a morsel of food. A Confederate water battery that defended Vicksburg Confederate works behind ViYank, chuck us a piece of bacon. When Mason's company halted in the city not a haversack contained a morsel of food. A Confederate water battery that defended Vicksburg Confederate works behind Vicksburg: where Grant's army was held for over six weeks entrenchments at every halt. In at least two of the great battles during the preceding period of the war — Bull Run and Shiloh — no entrenchments to speak of had been used. Now, Halleck, going to the extreme in the other direction, lost valuable time constructing trenches for which a little effort at reconnaissance would have told him there was no use. With such good preliminary preparation we should be prepared to see field-fortificatio
open. Self-preservation as a law of nature, and necessity, as the mother of invention, soon impressed themselves, however, on the officers and men confronting one another in the field — the How the pioneer photographer helped to fortify The lettering on the wagon curtain, Photographic wagon, Engineer Department, explains how the problem of preserving the visual teachings of war was solved for the Union Government. Vast strides in photography were being made by the pioneers Brady, Gardner, and Captain Poe. Diagrams and sketches gave place to actual reflections of the engineering problems which were overcome. Here is the first instance of field-photography for a war department. This photograph reveals the interior of Union Fort Steadman, in front of Petersburg, and its bomb-proof quarters in traverses. On the right is a photographic wagon of the Engineer Corps. The attendant is taking his ease in its shade. This photographic outfit was maintained for the purpose of keep
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 11
who fell. Grant went East, turning over the command of the Western Federal armies to Sherman, who prepared to attack Johnston, entrenched around Dalton, in northern Georgia. Buzzard's Roost formed the strongest portion of Johnston's line, which Johnston's line, which consisted of heavy fortifications on the heights, in front of which lighter lines had been placed. Sherman felt this position, found it almost impregnable, made a flank movement, and turned Johnston out of his stronghold. In the retaining attack onJohnston out of his stronghold. In the retaining attack on the works, the Federal troops took a portion of the lower lines of entrenchments, but found the upper works too strong. The turning movement having succeeded, the Union troops withdrew from the front, and Johnston retired to Saps at VicksburJohnston retired to Saps at Vicksburg. In the center rises Coonskin Tower, a lookout and station for sharpshooters. It was built under the direction of Lieutenant Henry C. Foster of the Twenty-third Indiana Infantry. In honor of his raccoon-fur cap, the soldiers nicknamed him Coon
in the campaign to follow that the important instruction in the art was to come. The progress of the Federals was energetically disputed by inferior numbers in field-works at Williamsburg, which was not so solidly fortified as Yorktown. A large Fort with six redoubts bar-red the road into the town, but, with the flanks not well protected, the position could be turned, and the Union troops did not wait to undertake a siege. At Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Seven Pines, Malvern Hill, and Harrison's Federal fortifications at Allatoona pass, Georgia When Sherman's army passed this point — early in June, 1864--entrenching was becoming a fine art with the American armies. From the battle of New Hope Church, on May 25th, almost every advanced line on either side entrenched itself as spon as its position was taken up. Not to be outdone by their Western comrades, the great armies operating in Virginia also got down and dug dirt. In timber, huge logs were placed in position and cove
n Railroad, it was nevertheless an exceedingly well-constructed example of field-works. It had to be so in order to stand up against the vindictive fire of Fort Mahone. From this fastness the determined Confederates incessantly tried to render Sedgwick susceptible to assault, thus enabling them to break through and relieve the Army of Northern Virginia from its predicament. The Petersburg campaign was not exactly a formal siege, but the operations of two armies strongly entrenched, either of ons of the residents of the locality in search of fire wood. A few years after the war hardly a vestige of them remained. Rainstorms had done more damage than the tons of Federal shells. Fort Sedgwick, where the garrison held its ground Sedgwick — gabions heightened by sand-bags placed. With only a light line of works, he was able to withstand the onslaughts of one of the best armies of the Confederacy and withdraw with all his trains and supplies, after inflicting a very large loss o
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9