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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
were, however, highly satisfactory, and warranted the belief that cast-iron guns of these calibers might be introduced into the service with safety and Fort Sumter in 1863. Battery B of the First United States Artillery became known as Henry's Battery from the name of its young commander, Lieutenant Guy V. Henry (afterward a brigadier-general; later still a conspicuous figure in the Spanish-American War). it took part in the siege operations against Forts Wagner and Gregg on Morris I The metal proved too soft to stand the additional wear on rifled guns, however, and it was then found that wrought iron served the purpose best. Later forged steel proved more satisfactory for breech loaders. Light field guns — a piece of Henry's Battery, before Sumter in 1863 After the attempt on Sumter-third New York Light artillery Napoleon gun in battery no. 2, Fort Whipple: peace at the defenses of Washington The lush, waving grass beautifies this Union fort, one of the fin
Blakely (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
the Confederates during the bombardment. The parapets have been repaired, all is in order, and a lady in the costume of the day graces the Fort with her presence. Pulaski mounted forty-eight guns in all. Twenty bore upon Tybee Island, from which the bombardment was conducted. They included five 10-inch Columbiads, nine 8-inch Columbiads, three 42-pounders, three 10-inch mortars, one 12-inch mortar, one 24-pounder howitzer, two 12-pounder howitzers, twenty 32-pounders, and two 4 1/2-inch Blakely rifled guns. Against these General Gillmore brought six 10-inch and four 8-inch Columbiads, five 30-pounder Parrotts, twelve 13-inch and four 10-inch siege mortars, and one 48-pounder, two 64-pounder and two 84-pounder James rifles. The most distant of the batteries on Tybee Island was 3,400 yards from the Fort, and the nearest 1,650. modern siege-guns can be effective at a dozen miles. Modern field Artillery has a maximum effective range of 6,000 yards. In the Civil War the greatest ef
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
General Quincy A. Gillmore was the reduction of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, which fell April 11, 1862. the upper photograph shows the Third Rhode Island Artillery at drill in the Fort, and the lower shows battery a, looking toward Tybee. Behind the parapet is part of the remains of the covered way used by the Confederates during the bombardment. The parapets have been repaired, all is in order, and a lady in the costume of the day graces the Fort with her presence. Pulaski mounted forty-eight guns in all. Twenty bore upon Tybee Island, from which the bombardment was conducted. They included five 10-inch Columbiads, nine 8-inch Columbiads, three 42-pounders, three 10-inch mortars, one 12-inch mortar, one 24-pounder howitzer, two 12-pounder howitzers, twenty 32-pounders, and two 4 1/2-inch Blakely rifled guns. Against these General Gillmore brought six 10-inch and four 8-inch Columbiads, five 30-pounder Parrotts, twelve 13-inch and four 10-inch siege mortars,
the development of the resources of the United States, less material had been purchased abroad during the year ending June 30, 1863, than at previous periods of the war, and the Ordnance Department determined that still less should be acquired in Europe in the future. The only articles of which there appeared to be a possible lack were sulphur and saltpeter. During the year the reserve supply of saltpeter had been held intact, and all the powder necessary had been purchased, while the supply ois was known as a center-pintle carriage. It could be revolved in a complete circle. to meet successfully all the exigencies of the great war, and to keep supplies going out constantly to a tremendous army operating over a territory as large as Europe. And the quality of the Ordnance supplied had surpassed anything theretofore used in the armies of the world. during the year ending June 30, 1863, over twenty thousand officers had been accountable to the Department for Ordnance and Ordnance
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hrough it. So successful was this method that the War Department, in 1860, authorized a 15-inch smoothbore gun. It proved a great success. General Rodman then projected his 20-inch smooth-bore gun, which was made in 1864 under his direction at Fort Pitt, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. It was mounted at Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, very soon afterwards, but on account of the tremendous size and destructive effect of its projectiles it was fired only four times during the war. It was almost impossPittsburg, Pennsylvania. It was mounted at Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, very soon afterwards, but on account of the tremendous size and destructive effect of its projectiles it was fired only four times during the war. It was almost impossible to get a target that would withstand the shots and leave anything to show what had happened. These four shots were fired with 50, 75, 100 and 125 pounds of powder. The projectile weighed 1,080 pounds, and the maximum pressure on the bore was 25,000 pounds. In March, 1867, it was again fired four times with 125, 150, 175 and 200 pounds of powder, each time with an elevation of twenty-five degrees, the projectile attaining a maximum range of 8,001 yards. This is no mean record even compare
Watervliet (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
hief of Ordnance had taken energetic measures, as far as the funds appropriated would permit, to enlarge the principal arsenals, viz.: Watertown, Massachusetts; Watervliet, West Troy, New York; Allegheny, Pennsylvania; St. Louis, Missouri; Washington, and Benicia, California. owing to the development of the resources of the UniWest Troy, New York; Allegheny, Pennsylvania; St. Louis, Missouri; Washington, and Benicia, California. owing to the development of the resources of the United States, less material had been purchased abroad during the year ending June 30, 1863, than at previous periods of the war, and the Ordnance Department determined that still less should be acquired in Europe in the future. The only articles of which there appeared to be a possible lack were sulphur and saltpeter. During the yeuties of cleaning, repairing, preserving, and storing the tremendous quantities of war materiel that had accumulated. Fire-proof warehouses were constructed at Watervliet, Frankfort, and Allegheny arsenals, three great magazines were constructed at St. Louis Arsenal, and one each at Washington and Benicia arsenals. The Harper's
France (France) (search for this): chapter 8
mall arms used during the conflict, and to making preparations for the conversion of the old Springfield muskets, the best in the world of their kind, into rifled breech-loaders, the new type which the experience of war had brought into being. France had sent an army into Mexico. The United States declared this a violation of the Monroe Doctrine, and the issue was doubtful. The Ordnance Department expected further trouble, but was fully prepared for it. The able officers of the department atment and the devoted personnel under their direction had made an institution unsurpassed in history. Be it for peace or war, no concern was felt for the outcome, for arms, equipments, and miscellaneous stores for nearly two million men were ready for issue, or already in the hands of troops. This was the net result of the great labors of the men of the department. But France realized the power of the United States, withdrew her forces from the support of Maximilian, and the crisis was past.
Enfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
The United States musket then, as nearly always since, had no superior in the world. The patriotic efforts of the States to assist the general Government were well shown by the action of New York in purchasing, early in 1861, twenty thousand Enfield rifles from England, with an initial purchase of one hundred thousand Ladies and officers in the interior court, Washington arsenal These leisurely ladies and unhurried officers do not betray the feverish activity which existed in the Uniolimited capacity of the arsenals, there should be purchased from abroad from 50,000 to 100,000 small arms and eight batteries of rifled cannon. There was no immediate action on this request. Early in 1861 the State of New York purchased 20,000 Enfield rifles from England, with an initial purchase of 100,000 rounds of ammunition. Efforts were made to encourage the private manufacturers in the Northern States to increase the capacity of their plants, and to provide a uniform pattern. The Spri
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
les being exceedingly destructive. These mortars were sometimes used for siege purposes, as at Yorktown, but their great weight made them difficult to move and emplace in temporary works. the breechrg, a whole division of Ewell's corps was A Dahlgren 11-inch smooth-bore naval gun, opposite Yorktown The Dahlgren guns of large caliber were made of cast iron, solid and cooled from the exteriotch Gap Canal, over two m iles away. An 8-inch Parrott and a Rodman gun In this battery at Yorktown are a pear-shaped Rodman gun and the long slim lines of an 8-inch Parrott in front. The latterut one-half million captured muskets of domestic McClellan's guns and gunners ready to leave Yorktown this photograph of May, 1862, shows artillery that accompanied McClellan to the Peninsula, parked near the lower wharf at Yorktown after the Confederates evacuated that city. The masts of the transports, upon which the pieces are to be loaded, rise in the background. On the shore stand the
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
64, turn out three hundred thousand of the finest muskets in the world, annually, and the arsenal at Rock Island, Illinois, was under construction, and promised a great addition to the capacity of the Ordnance Department. There were, in the hands of troops in the field, one and one-quarter million small arms, and the stock on hand in the armories and Fort Pulaski. one of the first siege exploits of General Quincy A. Gillmore was the reduction of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, which fell April 11, 1862. the upper photograph shows the Third Rhode Island Artillery at drill in the Fort, and the lower shows battery a, looking toward Tybee. Behind the parapet is part of the remains of the covered way used by the Confederates during the bombardment. The parapets have been repaired, all is in order, and a lady in the costume of the day graces the Fort with her presence. Pulaski mounted forty-eight guns in all. Twenty bore upon Tybee Island, from which the bombar
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