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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
to load the vessels. and foreign make. All the latter were being sold as fast as suitable prices could be obtained, and Ordnance stores of a perishable nature were also being disposed of. all the Southern arsenals that had been in the hands of the Confederate forces were reoccupied by the Union authorities, except that at Fayetteville, North Carolina, which had been destroyed. The Confederates also had a powder-mill at Augusta, Georgia, and a laboratory and an unfinished armory at Macon, Georgia. These had been captured, and were occupied by the Federal Ordnance Department. the evident importance of arming permanent fortifications as fast as they were built, required the construction of cannon and carriages for that purpose as far as the appropriations would permit. The construction of the forts had proceeded faster than the equipment of them, on account of the difficulty in finding suitable cannon to meet the increasingly exacting conditions of warfare. Wooden carriages h
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
g and safe-keeping of ordnance and ordnance stores in the United States. There were stored in arsenals in the South about 61,000 small arms of all patterns which fell into the hands of the Confederates. About April 23, 1861, the Chief of Ordnance suggested that, in view of the limited capacity of the arsenals, there should be purchased from abroad from 50,000 to 100,000 small arms and eight batteries of rifled cannon. There was no immediate action on this request. Early in 1861 the State of New York purchased 20,000 Enfield rifles from England, with an initial purchase of 100,000 rounds of ammunition. Efforts were made to encourage the private manufacturers in the Northern States to increase the capacity of their plants, and to provide a uniform pattern. The Springfield model of United States rifle was then the standard. The arsenal was kept in model condition throughout the war. In the yard were stored thousands of heavy and light cannon, with hundreds of thousands of projecti
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
forces. In the background is part of a wagon train beginning to load the vessels. and foreign make. All the latter were being sold as fast as suitable prices could be obtained, and Ordnance stores of a perishable nature were also being disposed of. all the Southern arsenals that had been in the hands of the Confederate forces were reoccupied by the Union authorities, except that at Fayetteville, North Carolina, which had been destroyed. The Confederates also had a powder-mill at Augusta, Georgia, and a laboratory and an unfinished armory at Macon, Georgia. These had been captured, and were occupied by the Federal Ordnance Department. the evident importance of arming permanent fortifications as fast as they were built, required the construction of cannon and carriages for that purpose as far as the appropriations would permit. The construction of the forts had proceeded faster than the equipment of them, on account of the difficulty in finding suitable cannon to meet the in
Washington (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
f labor and raw material, even if they so desired, and no private establishment could afford to carry on hand a large stock of Ordnance stores such as would meet possible demands from the Government. Warned by repeated failures to procure supplies, the chief of Ordnance had taken energetic measures, as far as the funds appropriated would permit, to enlarge the principal arsenals, viz.: Watertown, Massachusetts; Watervliet, West Troy, New York; Allegheny, Pennsylvania; St. Louis, Missouri; Washington, and Benicia, California. owing to the development of the resources of the United States, less material had been purchased abroad during the year ending June 30, 1863, than at previous periods of the war, and the Ordnance Department determined that still less should be acquired in Europe in the future. The only articles of which there appeared to be a possible lack were sulphur and saltpeter. During the year the reserve supply of saltpeter had been held intact, and all the powder nece
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
army O. E. Hunt, Captain, United States Army A Federal transport in April, 1865, taking artillery down the James river. The view is near Fort Darling on Drewry's bluff The provision of muskets and cannon for the vast army of volunte0-inch Columbiad in battery Semmes With a charge of fifteen pounds of powder this gun, above Farrar's Island on the James River, could throw a shot weighing 123 pounds 3,976 yards, or as far as the Dutch Gap Canal, over two m iles away. An 8-inHowever, many Parrott rifled Handling heavy guns it was no slight task to move the heavy ordnance, after the James River was opened and Richmond had fallen. The barge in the upper photograph has sunk deep into the water and lists heavily. photograph. This was a giant sling-cart used by the Federals in removing captured ordnance from the batteries on the James River below Richmond, after there was no more use for the battery shown above. By means of this apparatus the heaviest sieg
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
covered way used by the Confederates during the bombardment. The parapets have been repaired, all is in order, and a lady in the costume of the day graces the Fort with her presence. Pulaski mounted forty-eight guns in all. Twenty bore upon Tybee Island, from which the bombardment was conducted. They included five 10-inch Columbiads, nine 8-inch Columbiads, three 42-pounders, three 10-inch mortars, one 12-inch mortar, one 24-pounder howitzer, two 12-pounder howitzers, twenty 32-pounders, andGeneral Gillmore brought six 10-inch and four 8-inch Columbiads, five 30-pounder Parrotts, twelve 13-inch and four 10-inch siege mortars, and one 48-pounder, two 64-pounder and two 84-pounder James rifles. The most distant of the batteries on Tybee Island was 3,400 yards from the Fort, and the nearest 1,650. modern siege-guns can be effective at a dozen miles. Modern field Artillery has a maximum effective range of 6,000 yards. In the Civil War the greatest effective range of field Artillery
Broadway Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t was no slight task to move the heavy ordnance, after the James River was opened and Richmond had fallen. The barge in the upper photograph has sunk deep into the water and lists heavily. A crowd of men are busy handling it. The tripod at Broadway Landing in the lower photograph had legs about as thick as the body of a man, but it looks none too large to handle the big guns lying beneath. Judging from the height of the sentry standing by its left leg, the guns are ten feet long. Both of them are reinforced at the breech. Towing a piece from a Confederate battery on the James A tripod swinging Parrott guns by the Appomattox. At Broadway landing cast-iron field-guns were successfully used. These received a reenforcement of wrought iron shrunk around the base. A considerable number of the bronze Napoleon guns were, however, retailed, and did effective service at short ranges. for heavier Ordnance cast iron was early found to be the most suitable material, and proved ent
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
in the market of labor and raw material, even if they so desired, and no private establishment could afford to carry on hand a large stock of Ordnance stores such as would meet possible demands from the Government. Warned by repeated failures to procure supplies, the chief of Ordnance had taken energetic measures, as far as the funds appropriated would permit, to enlarge the principal arsenals, viz.: Watertown, Massachusetts; Watervliet, West Troy, New York; Allegheny, Pennsylvania; St. Louis, Missouri; Washington, and Benicia, California. owing to the development of the resources of the United States, less material had been purchased abroad during the year ending June 30, 1863, than at previous periods of the war, and the Ordnance Department determined that still less should be acquired in Europe in the future. The only articles of which there appeared to be a possible lack were sulphur and saltpeter. During the year the reserve supply of saltpeter had been held intact, and al
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 8
ontract had to be recognized to a great extent. The States had already sent troops for service armed with numerous patterns of rifles, and it was impracticable to rearm all of them. On January 25, 1862, the chief of ordnance reported to Secretary Stanton that, under the administration of his predecessor, Secretary Cameron, it had been tentatively decided to have, if possible, but one caliber of rifles, and to cause the necessary changes to be made to accomplish this. It was found that therr the former models of repeaters — and from that time to the end of the war these and kindred types were greatly sought after by new regiments going to the front. During the first part of the war, so great was the demand for muskets that Secretary Stanton approved a recommendation of the chief of ordnance on August 8, 1862, for a somewhat lenient interpretation of the contracts with private establishments delivering small arms. General Ripley stated that it had been found impossible to hold
D. Nostrand (search for this): chapter 8
ctile attaining a maximum range of 8,001 yards. This is no mean record even compared with twentieth century pieces. we publish on page 255 an accurate drawing of the great fifteen-inch gun at Fort Monroe, Virginia; and also a picture, from a recent sketch, showing the experiments which are being made with a view to test it. It is proper that we should say that the small drawing is from the lithograph which is published in Major Barnard's Notes on sea-coast defense, published by Mr. D. Van Nostrand, of the city. this gun was cast at Pittsbugh, Pennsylvania, by Knap, Rudd and Co., under the direction of Captain T. J. Rodman, of the Ordnance Corps. Its dimensions are as follows: total length190 inches. length of calibre of bore156 inches. length of ellipsoidal chamber9 inches. total length of bore165 inches. maximum exterior diameter.48 inches. news of March 30, 1861. with their introduction into the foreign services. Prior to that time, artillerists and invento
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