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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Romeo (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ter was let in it took some days for it to attain a sufficient level in the vast area flooded. Late in February, Smith and his squadron started out with transports carrying 6,000 troops. Struggling against overhanging trees and masses of driftwood, pausing to remove great trees which the Confederates had felled in their way, the gunboats managed to pick a channel, and approached Fort Pemberton on March 11, 1863. Many of the gunboats had suffered severely from this amphibious warfare. The Romeo had her stacks carried away, the Petrel had lost her wheel, and the Chillicothe had started a plank by running upon a submerged stump. The soldiers were grumbling at the constant labor of digging the gunboats out of the woods. The channel was so obstructed and narrow that only one gunboat at a time could effectually engage Fort Pemberton. After a few days of ineffectual bombardment the expedition was abandoned and the gunboats returned to the Mississippi over the same long, difficult cour
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ivers. It was soon seen that the hold upon Tennessee and Kentucky gained by the Federals by the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson would be lost without adequate assistance from the navy, and Admiral Porter was authorized to purchase small light-drafteels of three of the series of the Eads ironclads, and here the unlucky Carondelet was repaired after her injuries at Fort Donelson. The large force of shipwrights, carpenters, mechanics, and engineers was kept constantly at work, often night and dr to Foote before the land forces were able, on account of the bad roads, to put in an appearance. On February 14th, Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River, invested by Grant's army, was vigorously attacked by the same flotilla, with the exception r Foote's powerful ironclads. The opportunity was not long in coming. Foote, suffering from the wound received at Fort Donelson, was relieved by Captain Charles H. Davis on May 9th. The new commander, who was soon to be promoted to flag-officer
Pleasant Hill, Cass County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
with the transports carrying A. J. Smith's column of 10,000 men. Fort De Russy was captured, and Alexandria and Natchitoches fell into Union hands as they advanced. Banks with his army arrived a week later. At Sabine Cross Roads the vanguard met the Confederates in force. Sufficient care had not been taken to keep the several Union bodies together, and the Confederates under General Taylor defeated Franklin April 8th, and drove him back with a loss of 3,000 out of 11,000 engaged. At Pleasant Hill, A. J. Smith made a stand on April 9th, but was unable to hold his own. An immediate retreat was made, without waiting to bury the dead, and the fleet came near being cut off by low water at Alexandria, but the ingenuity of Colonel Bailey in constructing a dam and water-way enabled it to escape. In the picture the level in front of the hotel is piled with ammunition and supplies — elaborate preparations all wasted. Entrapped above the falls — gloomy days of waiting and narrow escape
Manila Bay (Philippines) (search for this): chapter 10
t to mention the coolness of my executive officer, Mr. Dewey, and the steady, fearless, and gallant manner in which the officers and men of the Mississippi defended her, and the orderly and quiet manner in which she was abandoned after being thirty-five minutes aground under the fire of the enemy's batteries. There was no confusion in embarking the crew, and the only noise was from the enemy's cannon. Lieutenant-Commander George Dewey, here mentioned at the age of 26, was to exemplify in Manila Bay on May 1, 1898, the lessons he was learning from Farragut. lot of craft, under the control of the army, and known as the River Defense Fleet. They were river steamers, with bows enclosed in iron, and were designed for use as rams. Fourteen vessels in all were thus prepared, and eight were sent up the river in charge of Captain James E. Montgomery to try conclusions with Flag-Officer Foote's powerful ironclads. The opportunity was not long in coming. Foote, suffering from the wound
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
night or two later, Walke was the first to tempt what seemed in the minds of the other officers annihilation. The passing of the batteries sealed the fate of Island No.10, and it was surrendered on April 7, 1862, leaving the Federal fleet free to proceed toward the strongly built Fort Pillow. A word must be said of the effortme time, engaging the shore batteries now occupied by the troops of Generals Pope and Buford. He had resolved to stop the Federal gunboats if they should pass Island No.10, but he soon began to doubt his ability to do this, and, besides, his powder supply became almost exhausted. So he went down the river in response to an urgener its guns had been left behind at Fort Pillow, to prevent its falling into the hands of the Federals. The scout-boat Grampus and six transports were sunk at Island No.10 before the surrender. The latter were raised, and one of them became famous as the hospital-ship Red Rover. Hollins' ships were now replaced by a somewhat
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
essee and Cumberland Rivers. It was soon seen that the hold upon Tennessee and Kentucky gained by the Federals by the fall of Forts Henry and an island in the Mississippi opposite the dividing line between Tennessee and Kentucky, holding the bank of the river below this point by mFederal success at Chattanooga made it important to patrol the upper Tennessee River, and a number of small gunboats were built for that purpe military leaders whose strategy had resulted in the recovery of Tennessee to the Union. Federal gunboats on the upper Tennessee Goveupper Tennessee Government steamboat used on the upper Tennessee in 1864-65 Squadron, as the Western Flotilla was now called, and had control of the river betweupper Tennessee in 1864-65 Squadron, as the Western Flotilla was now called, and had control of the river between Vicksburg and Port Hudson. Farragut once more entered the river and ran two vessels of his squadron past the works at Port Hudson on the ttle of Chickamauga, late in 1863, they needed gunboats on the upper Tennessee River, but none of Admiral Porter's fleet could cross the Muss
Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
active in the flotilla cooperating with General W. T. Sherman against Haynes' Bluff and Drumgould's Bluff, Mississippi, to distract attention from Grant's famous movement to the south of Vicksburg. She accompanied the expedition that captured Yazoo City on May 21, 1863, and destroyed $2,000,000 worth of Confederate vessels, yards, mills, and other property. On June 7, 1863, she, with the little Lexington, drove off the Confederate attack on Milliken's Bend, Louisiana. In 1864, she accompanien-clad Number 2, the Marmora, under Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Robert Getty, played a lively part in the operations of Admiral Porter's squadron against Vicksburg. She and the Signal were the tin-clads that reconnoitered up the torpedo-infested Yazoo, Dec. 11, 1862, and it was while protecting the Marmora from the Confederates along the bank that the luckless Cairo met her fate. The Marmora was with the fleet in Sherman's futile attack at Chickasaw Bayou. After the fall of Vicksburg, the sq
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ieutenant George M. Bache, the brave commander of the lost Cincinnati. He, in the little veteran Lexington, accompanied by the Cricket and Marmora, went up the White River where the Confederates were massing. In the middle of August, 1863, the three little gunboats completely broke up the expedition that was being set afoot by thrg. A terrible disaster happened on June 17th to the gunboat Mound City, which, in company with the St. Louis, Lexington, and Conestoga, had been sent up the White River to convoy troops and transports and to assist in an attack on the Confederate batteries at St. Charles, Arkansas. A shot from a masked gun on the bank penetrat May, 1864 The tin-clad piloted by an Admiral: the Cricket --Porter's flagship on the return After capturing single-handed two Confederate steamers on the White River, this little fourth-rate vessel took an active part in the bombardment of Vicksburg under command of Acting Master A. R. Langthorne. On the Red River expeditio
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Rivers. It was soon seen that the hold upon Tennessee and Kentucky gained by the Federals by the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson would be lost without adequate assistance from the navy, and Admiral Porter was authorized to purchase small light-draft river steamers and add them to Fitch's flotilla as rapidly as they could be converted into gunboats. One of the first to be completed was the Silver Lake. The little stern-wheel steamer first distinguished herself on February 3, 1863, at Dover, Tennessee, where she (with Fitch's flotilla) assisted in routing 4,500 Confederates, who were attacking the Federals at that place. The little vessel continued to render yeoman's service with the other gunboats, ably assisted by General A. W. Ellet's marine brigade. The navy's fresh-water sailors In this group the crew of the Carondelet is crowding to get within range of the camera. One of the earliest of the river ironclads, the Carondelet was frequently the flagship of Admiral Porter;
Natchitoches (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d river expedition of April, 1864--Federal transports below the falls On the second Red river expedition, in 1864, Alexandria was garrisoned and made the base for the army and navy operating both above and below that point, in the effort that had for its ultimate object the recovery of Texas to the Union. The fleet under Admiral Porter started up the Red River from Vicksburg with the transports carrying A. J. Smith's column of 10,000 men. Fort De Russy was captured, and Alexandria and Natchitoches fell into Union hands as they advanced. Banks with his army arrived a week later. At Sabine Cross Roads the vanguard met the Confederates in force. Sufficient care had not been taken to keep the several Union bodies together, and the Confederates under General Taylor defeated Franklin April 8th, and drove him back with a loss of 3,000 out of 11,000 engaged. At Pleasant Hill, A. J. Smith made a stand on April 9th, but was unable to hold his own. An immediate retreat was made, without w
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