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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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March 29th (search for this): chapter 7
ge waited till the heads of the Confederates appeared above the river bank. Then he let drive at them with his two big guns, pouring upon them a rain of grape, canister, and shrapnel. General Green, who behaved with the greatest gallantry, had his head blown off. After an hour and a half the Confederates withdrew from the unequal contest, with a loss of over four hundred dead and wounded. The Osage was sent to Mobile Bay in the spring of 1865 and was there sunk by a submarine torpedo on March 29th. A veteran of the rivers — the Pittsburg The Pittsburg was one of the seven ironclads that Eads completed in a hundred days. She first went into action at Fort Donelson, where she was struck forty times. Two shots from the Confederates pierced her below the guards. She began shipping water so fast that it was feared that she would sink. In turning around to get out of range, she fouled the Carondelet's stern, breaking one of her rudders. In going ahead to clear the Carondelet f
April 12th (search for this): chapter 7
he new leviathans of the river The low, rotating monitor-turret of this ironclad and her great guns saved both herself and the transport Black Hawk from capture during the return of the Red River expedition. The Osage was a later addition to the squadron; she and her sister ironclad, the Neosho, were among the most powerful on the rivers. Porter took both with him up the Red River. On the return the Osage was making the descent with great difficulty, in tow of the Black Hawk, when on April 12th she ran aground opposite Blair's plantation. A Confederate force twelve hundred strong, under General Thomas Green, soon appeared on the west bank and, planting four field-pieces, advanced to attack the stranded ironclad. The brisk enfilading fire of the Lexington and the Neosho did not deter them. Lieutenant-Commander T. O. Selfridge waited till the heads of the Confederates appeared above the river bank. Then he let drive at them with his two big guns, pouring upon them a rain of gra
the construction of monitors while the type was still an experiment, had merely succeeded in adding so many iron coffins to the navy. It was asserted that no monitor would prove seaworthy in heavy weather, to say nothing of being able to cross the ocean. In the spring of 1866, therefore, the Navy Department determined to despatch the Miantonomoh across the Atlantic; and, to show his faith in the iron coffins he had advocated, Assistant Secretary Fox embarked on her at St. John, N. B., on June 5th. Meanwhile the Monadnock had been despatched around the Horn to San Francisco; her progress was watched with far greater enthusiasm than that of the Oregon during the Spanish War. The Miantonomoh reached Queenstown in safety, after a passage of ten days and eighteen hours, and about the same time the Monadnock arrived at her destination, thus proving beyond cavil both the speed and seaworthiness of the American monitor. An epoch in naval warfare Under the date of July 4, 1861, th
August 13th (search for this): chapter 7
the double-turreted monitor. In the Saugus is well exemplified his principle of mounting guns in such a manner that they could be brought to bear in any direction. This object was defeated somewhat in the double-turreted type, since each turret masked a considerable angle of fire of the other. The Saugus, together with the Tecumseh and Canonicus and the Onondaga, served in the six-hour action with Battery Dantzler and the Confederate vessels in the James River, June 21, 1864. Again on August 13th she locked horns with the Confederate fleet at Dutch Gap. She was actively engaged on the James and the Appomattox and took part in the fall of Fort Fisher, the event that marked the beginning of the last year of the war. The latest type of iron sea-elephant in 1864: the double-turreted monitor Onondaga After having steadily planned and built monitors of increasing efficiency during the war, the Navy Department finally turned its attention to the production of a double-turreted o
September 16th (search for this): chapter 7
d that have been repeated and improved in all subsequent naval shipbuilding. Being fully aware that there was being built in the old Norfolk Navy-Yard an iron-clad vessel, but quite misinformed as to its power and scope, the Federal Navy Department, on August 7, 1861, advertised for bids for the construction of one or more iron-clad steam vessels of war . . . of not less than ten or over sixteen feet draft of water, to carry an armament of from eighty to one hundred tons weight. On September 16th, the board appointed to examine the ideas submitted made a long and exhaustive report. After the preamble occurs the following paragraph that is here quoted verbatim: J. Ericsson, New York, page 19.--This plan of a floating battery is novel, but seems to be based upon a plan which will render the battery U. S. S. Galena --one of the three first experiments in Federal ironclads The Civil War in America solved for the world the question of the utility of armor plate in the const
are not such as a sea-going vessel should possess. But she may be moved from one place to another on the coast in smooth water. We recommend that an experiment be made with one battery of this description on the terms proposed, with a guarantee and forfeiture in case of failure in any of the properties and points of the vessel as proposed. Price, $275,000; length of vessel, 172 feet; breadth of beam, 41 feet; depth of hold, 11 feet; time, 100 days; draft of water, 10 feet; displacement, 1255 tons; speed per hour, 9 statute miles. This was the first notice of the famous Monitor. The idea of her construction was not exactly new, but no vessel of this class had ever been launched. She resembled, in a measure, the suggested floating battery of Stevens, but still more that proposed in the plans of Theodore R. Timby, of New York, and submitted to the War Department by him in the year 1841. This included specifications and drawings for a revolving iron battery, and practically was
amers, or floating batteries, to be constructed, with a view to perfect protection from the effects of present ordnance at short range, and make an appropriation for that purpose. For a long time the armored vessel had been the pet of the inventor, and the building of iron ships of war had been contemplated. To go into the history of such attempts would be to review, in a measure, all the records of the past, for ironprotected ships had been constructed for many years, and as far back as 1583 the Dutch had built a flat-bottomed sailing John Ericsson, Ll.D.-the precursor of a new naval era The battle of Ericsson's Monitor with the Merrimac settled the question of wooden navies for the world. Born in Sweden in 1803, Ericsson was given a cadetship in the corps of engineers at the age of eleven. In 1839, with several notable inventions already to his credit, he came to America and laid before the Navy Department his new arrangement of the steam machinery in warships. It had b
pet of the inventor, and the building of iron ships of war had been contemplated. To go into the history of such attempts would be to review, in a measure, all the records of the past, for ironprotected ships had been constructed for many years, and as far back as 1583 the Dutch had built a flat-bottomed sailing John Ericsson, Ll.D.-the precursor of a new naval era The battle of Ericsson's Monitor with the Merrimac settled the question of wooden navies for the world. Born in Sweden in 1803, Ericsson was given a cadetship in the corps of engineers at the age of eleven. In 1839, with several notable inventions already to his credit, he came to America and laid before the Navy Department his new arrangement of the steam machinery in warships. It had been regarded with indifference in England, yet it was destined to revolutionize the navies of the world. In 1841 Ericsson was engaged in constructing the U. S. S. Princeton. She was the first steamship ever built with the propelli
s had the courage to recommend the Monitor, and this last great invention of Ericsson brought him immortal fame. Ie died in New York in 1889. His body was sent back to his native land on board the U. S. S. Baltimore as a mark of the navy's high esteem. vessel that was virtually an ironclad. She accomplished nothing but successfully running ashore, and was captured by the Spaniards, who regarded her as a curiosity. John Stevens, of Hoboken, New Jersey, submitted plans, during the War of 1812, for an ironclad to the United States Government. They were not acted upon, and America, for a time, watched Europe while she experimented with protecting iron belts, a movement that began soon after 1850, when ordnance had increased in power, penetration, and efficiency. All that was lacking in the United States up to the year 1861 was a demand, or an excuse, for experiment along the lines of progress in naval construction. It came with the outbreak of the Civil War. As a naval writer,
into the history of such attempts would be to review, in a measure, all the records of the past, for ironprotected ships had been constructed for many years, and as far back as 1583 the Dutch had built a flat-bottomed sailing John Ericsson, Ll.D.-the precursor of a new naval era The battle of Ericsson's Monitor with the Merrimac settled the question of wooden navies for the world. Born in Sweden in 1803, Ericsson was given a cadetship in the corps of engineers at the age of eleven. In 1839, with several notable inventions already to his credit, he came to America and laid before the Navy Department his new arrangement of the steam machinery in warships. It had been regarded with indifference in England, yet it was destined to revolutionize the navies of the world. In 1841 Ericsson was engaged in constructing the U. S. S. Princeton. She was the first steamship ever built with the propelling machinery below the water-line, and embodied a number of Ericsson's inventions — among
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