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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Catskill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
fter breakfast-time on the 9th, the Merrimac, followed by the Confederate squadron, got under way under a Deck of the Catskill --the leader of the great bombardment On July 10, 1863, under Commander George W. Rodgers, and with Rear-Admiral Dahlgren's flag floating above her, the Catskill steamed across the bar into Charleston Harbor and opened fire on Fort Wagner on Morris Island. She was followed by the Montauk, Nahant, and Weehawken, and immediately all the Confederate batteries in Charleston Harbor spoke out their terrific thunder. The Catskill was no stranger to that battle-ground; she had seen her first service in Admiral Du Pont's squadron that had failed to silence the defenses of Charleston the preceding April. Now came herwhile her side armor and deck-plates were pierced in many places, making the entrance of the water troublesome. But the Catskill, after firing 128 rounds, came out of action in good working order. On August 17th Commander Rodgers, while maneuvering
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ged them the Virginia ( Merrimac ) came down the river, but the two antagonists did not give battle to each other. On May 11th the Virginia was destroyed by the Confederates and it was determined to send the Monitor and several vessels up the James River in an effort to capture Richmond. On May 15th, the Federal vessels were confronted by the hastily constructed Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff. These works were all that stood between the Federals and the Confederate Capital, but behind them wthe ways at the same time. When the first was launched, she proved not sufficiently buoyant to sustain her armor and guns, giving a very good imitation of a submarine when striking the water. To meet the demand for light-drafts--three on the James River — these monitors were lightened by removing their turrets, as has been done in the case of the one in the picture. The naval reports record every form of disparagement of these vessels, except the profanity they evoked from officers and men.
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
exactly understood. . .. Whatever the cause, candor compels me to say that the Merrimac failed to reap the fruits of her victory. She went out to destroy the Minnesota, and do what further damage to the enemy she could. The Monitor was there to save the Minnesota. The Merrimac did not accomplish her purpose. The Monitor did. She did it Blockaders. While Admiral Porter with the fleet was waiting impatiently at Hampton Roads for the start of the much-delayed expedition against Fort Fisher, there was work a-plenty along the coast to keep up the blockade and circumvent the attempts of such Confederate vessels as the Roanoke to raise it. The upper picture is of especial popular interest; lying to the right of the despatchboat and monitor off Port Royal is James Gordon Bennett's yacht Rebecca, one of the fastest sailing yachts of her time. When she swept into Port Royal flying the Stars and Stripes, she was taken for a blockade-runner until her identity was learned. The offi
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
sively their superior endurance. The Lehigh first made her appearance in the James on an expedition and demonstration made up that river by Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee in July, 1863. In September she was attached to Admiral Dahlgren's fleet. From October 26th to November 4th, under Commander A. Bryson, she and the Patapsco were assigned to the special duty of hammering Fort Sumter. On November 16, 1863, she ran aground on Sullivan's Island and was dangerously exposed to the guns of Fort Moultrie for five hours before she could be gotten off. The new sea-elephant of the navy — the Lehigh in 1864 The monitor Lehigh. Ground, but always keeping herself between the Minnesota and the vessel that had counted her as prey. In fear of running aground, the Merrimac did not follow, and at about two o'clock, turned her bow toward Sewell's Point. It was a few minutes after noon when the Monitor made for the shallow water, and Lieutenant Worden had been stunned and almost blinde
Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
n the stream, and farther down toward Fortress Monroe the splendid steam frigates Minnesota and Roanoke, and the sailing frigate St. Lawrence. There were some nondescript vessels and a few decrepit hich were 9-inch; together, their crews amounted to well over a thousand men. The Minnesota and Roanoke had twelve hundred men between them, and carried over eighty 9-inch and 11-inch guns. There aded Merrimac hove in sight, everything had been commotion on board of them. The Minnesota and Roanoke were endeavoring to get up steam, and the St. Lawrence, as well as both of the former vessels, came drifting down the stream, that first the Minnesota, then the St. Lawrence, and lastly the Roanoke went aground, although the two last-named were soon afloat. While the Congress and the shorehe coast to keep up the blockade and circumvent the attempts of such Confederate vessels as the Roanoke to raise it. The upper picture is of especial popular interest; lying to the right of the despa
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
towing lines, and they were making every effort to gain the scene of active fighting. Near Sewell's Point, at the south of the James where the Elizabeth River flows into it, was a heavy Confederate nder Lieutenant-Commander W. N. Jeffers, she led a squadron against the Confederate works at Sewell's Point, and as she engaged them the Virginia ( Merrimac ) came down the river, but the two antagoni it was supposed, until the morrow. The Merrimac and her consorts withdrew to anchorage off Sewell's Point. And so the curtain fell! It would be impossible to exaggerate the feeling of elation ons in Battles and leaders of the Civil war of the vessel's condition as she lay at anchor off Sewell's Point: The armor was hardly damaged, though at one time our ship was the focus on which were dunning aground, the Merrimac did not follow, and at about two o'clock, turned her bow toward Sewell's Point. It was a few minutes after noon when the Monitor made for the shallow water, and Lieuten
Montauk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
, we slept at our guns, dreaming of other victories in the morning. Shortly after breakfast-time on the 9th, the Merrimac, followed by the Confederate squadron, got under way under a Deck of the Catskill --the leader of the great bombardment On July 10, 1863, under Commander George W. Rodgers, and with Rear-Admiral Dahlgren's flag floating above her, the Catskill steamed across the bar into Charleston Harbor and opened fire on Fort Wagner on Morris Island. She was followed by the Montauk, Nahant, and Weehawken, and immediately all the Confederate batteries in Charleston Harbor spoke out their terrific thunder. The Catskill was no stranger to that battle-ground; she had seen her first service in Admiral Du Pont's squadron that had failed to silence the defenses of Charleston the preceding April. Now came her supreme test under Admiral Dahlgren. As his flagship she became the especial target. A large percentage of the sixty hits were very severe. Yet the brave men in the
Craney Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
after this the rebels concentrated their whole battery upon the tower and pilot-house of the Monitor, and soon after the latter stood down for Fortress Monroe, and we thought it probable she had exhausted her supply of ammunition or sustained some injury. Soon after, the Merrimac and two other steamers headed for my ship, and I then felt to the fullest extent my condition. . . . On ascending the poop-deck, I observed that the enemy's vessels had changed their course and were heading for Craney Island. Captain Parker's candid and unprejudiced review of this action states: Why the Merrimac did not persist in destroying the Minnesota, I never exactly understood. . .. Whatever the cause, candor compels me to say that the Merrimac failed to reap the fruits of her victory. She went out to destroy the Minnesota, and do what further damage to the enemy she could. The Monitor was there to save the Minnesota. The Merrimac did not accomplish her purpose. The Monitor did. She did it
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
was heard the sound of heavy firing, and Lieutenant John L. Worden, then in command, as he listened intently, estimated the distance to be full twenty miles and correctly guessed that it was the Merrimac in conflict with the Federal fleet. While she steamed ahead the Monitor was made ready for action, although such preparations were of the simplest character. Before long the flames and smoke from the burning Congress could be easily distinguished. At 9 P. M. the Monitor was alongside the Roanoke, whose commander, Captain Marston, suggested that she should go at once to the assistance of the Minnesota, which was still aground. It was midnight before Lieutenant S. Dana Greene, sent by Worden, reached the Minnesota and reported to Captain Van Brunt. While the two officers were talking there came a succession of loud reports, and the Congress blew up, as if warning her sisters of the fleet of the fate in store for them. There was little sleep for anyone that night. At seven o'clo
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
cated The first prize of a monitor--Federal officers on deck of the captured Confederate ram Atlanta The honor of the first decisive engagement with one of the formidable ironclads that were c of Wassaw Sound, followed by the Nahant. When about a mile and a half from the Weehawken, the Atlanta, which was aground, fired a rifleshot at her. The Weehawken, without replying, approached to wirds of the ram and opened fire. The first shot broke through the armor and wood backing of the Atlanta, strewing her deck with splinters and prostrating about forty of her crew by the concussion. Tport. Five shots in all were fired by the Weehawken in fifteen minutes. Then the colors of the Atlanta were hauled down, a white flag was hoisted, and Commander William A. Webb, C. S. N., put off in his sword to Captain Rodgers. The fight was over before the Nahant could become engaged. The Atlanta was not seriously damaged and was added to the Federal navy, where she did good service. hers
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