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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 206 total hits in 82 results.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
ain the national pension roll: carver hospital in Washington, September, 1864 The figure farthest to the riutions within the corporate limits of the city of Washington alone, and a total of twenty-five, with an aggreg hospital in this country being the Lincoln in Washington, D. C., which represented a total number of forty-sixote: November. Thirty years old. Decided to go to Washington as a nurse if I could find a place. Help needed,t the officers' quarters, Harewood hospital, near Washington Louisa M. Alcott, the author of little women, aide a Federal General hospital—the armory square, Washington Another view of ward K at the armory square s habit of visiting the Armory Square Hospital in Washington that so much care has been bestowed upon the flow interior of a ward at Harewood General hospital, Washington, in 1864 Interested convalescents interior of a ward at Harewood General hospital, Washington, in 1864 very great. During the first eighteen months of the
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
ster, and it was therefore possible to find the whereabouts or the fate of any patient in a few seconds. In addition to the general hospitals established for the treatment of patients until they were convalescent, wayside hospitals were established at every important junction-point. A Federal officer wounded at pine mountain, Georgia—August, 1864 This unusual photograph of an officer still on crutches, emaciated and suffering, was taken in August, 1864, near Pulpit Rock, Lookout Mountain, Tennessee. It is reproduced here through the courtesy of the officer himself—Major (later Colonel) L. R. Stegman, associated with the editors in the preparation of this work. In June, 1864, during Sherman's march to Atlanta, he was shot in the thigh, the shot fracturing the bone. Major Stegman was in command of the Hundred and Second New York, which was attached to the twentieth corps of the Army of the Cumberland. A wound of this character disabled the victim for many months. Colonel
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
t was trifling. The women of the South considered it a privilege to act as nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at vario
Jug Tavern (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansa
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
good service, particularly during that period before the general hospitals were built and the medical staff thoroughly organized. When the Medical Department became able to take care of all the sick and wounded, it seemed best, for obvious reasons, that all sick and wounded should be brought under direct supervision of the Medical Department, and a majority of the private hospitals were discontinued. One of them, however, established in Richmond just after the first battle of Manassas (Bull Run) by Miss Sally L. Tompkins, deserves mention. Doctor William Berrien Burroughs says of this hospital: Ten days after the battle, on July 30, 1861, entirely at her own expense she opened the Robertson Hospital (corner of Main and Third streets) which continued its mission of mercy to July 13, 1865. In Inside a Federal General hospital In the first part of the war, whenever the capacity of the regimental hospital canvas was exceeded, some neighboring dwelling-house would be ta
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansas with a number of her own servants and went to the seat of war in the West, serving first at Memphis, then at Belmont, Bowling Green, Nashville, Atlanta, Corinth, and Chattanooga. Nor must the work of the Roman Catholic sisterhoods be neglected. The nursing in some of the hospitals was entirely under their charge. At others, they worked with nurses appointed by the surgeons, or with volunteers. Every city or town containing a convent had in the inmates willing workers, who went where s
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
er daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansas with a number of her own servants and went to the seat of war in the West, serving first at Memphis, then at Belmont, Bowling Green, Nashville, Atlanta, Corinth, and Chattanooga. Nor must the work of the Roman Catholic sisterhoods be neglected. The nursing in some of the hospitals was entirely under their charge. At others, they worked with nurses appointed by the surgeons, or with volunteers. Every city or town containing a convent had in the inmates willing workers, who went where sickness and suffering were found.
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
of his patients, procuring for them articles of food to be had in the market. When chickens, butter, and eggs were not brought to the hospital in sufficient quantities, he sent out wagon-loads of cotton yarn purchased from the factories, and exchanged it for the much needed delicacies. After his promotion to the office of medical director, Doctor Stout was particularly insistent that real coffee should be served the patients in the hospitals under his control, and sent subordinates to Wilmington and Charleston to purchase it from the blockade-runners. A bakery was established at every hospital, and the saving thus made inured to the benefit of the hospital fund. He even went so far as to purchase at Chattanooga a printing outfit on which the numerous blanks needed for the use of the various hospitals were prepared. This was placed under the charge of privates detailed for the purpose and soon became a source of income. Seeds were bought for gardens, and, when the number of
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
laborate system of records, upon which the accuracy of the whole pension system of the Government rests, had to be maintained. Here the mortality statistics of the first division, Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac, were collected and preserved. The field desks had handles on the end, as seen, and were easily portable. The first-hand records of the pension system quarters of chief of ambulance, first division, ninth corps, in front of Petersburg, 1864 Part of the General hospital at City Point—the James river in the distance Doctor John R. Gildersleeve, when president of the Association of Medical Officers of the Army and Navy of the Confederacy, in 1904, delivered an interesting address upon Chimborazo Hospital, Richmond. When the necessity for larger hospital accommodations became evident, SurgeonGen-eral Moore, after consultation with Doctor James B. McCaw, of Richmond, chose Chimborazo Hill, on the outskirts of Richmond, as a site for the new hospital, and Doctor McCaw
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
be found in the country nearer the mountains, as yet undrained by the demands of the armies. The bakery had a capacity somewhat larger than was necessary for the hospital, and at times baked, by contract, a part of the bread for the prisoners in Belle Isle and Libby. From a series of articles prepared by Doctor Samuel H. Stout, Medical Director of the Army of Tennessee, we learn that the change of climate caused much sickness among the troops drawn from the Gulf States to Tennessee and Kentucky during the winter of 1861-62, and that only by the greatest exertions was Medical Director Yandell able to provide for the care of the sick. Most of these were sent to Hospital life. Hospital life for those well enough to enjoy it was far from dull. Witness the white-clad nurse with her prim apron and hoopskirt on the right of the photograph, and the band on the left. Most hospitals had excellent libraries and a full supply of current newspapers and periodicals, usually present
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