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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
y after the battle ended, not one wounded man of the great number who had fallen was left on the ground. The inspector-general of the army himself reported this interesting fact from personal examination. Ambulances going to the front—before the Wilderness campaign In the foreground of this photograph stand seven ambulances and two quartermasters' wagons, being prepared for active service in the field. The scene is the headquarters of Captain Bates, of the Third Army Corps, near Brandy Station. The following month (May, 1864) the Army of the Potomac moved to the front under General Grant in his decisive campaign from the Wilderness onward. A large quantity of stores lie upon the ground near the quartermasters' wagons ready for transportation to the front. As it became evident that any idea of providing each regiment with its individual hospital was impracticable in a large command, efforts were made to afford hospital facilities for each division at the front. As a result,
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
chooner lying at her bow are two of the vessels that were used in bringing medical supplies to the Army of the Potomac in its operations near Petersburg. All transport boats were at first under control of the quartermaster's department, but later a number were placed under the exclusive control of the medical officers. These varied in type from the finest freight boats to the best types of speedy steamers. United States hospital boat red rover at Vicksburg Hospital wharf on the Appomattox river, near City Point complete, to be used for succoring and transporting sick and wounded men, and for nothing else. The advantages of this organization became speedily manifest, and at the battle of Antietam, in the following month, it gave admirable service. Of its operation in the battle of Fredericksburg, Surgeon Charles O'Leary, medical director of the Sixth Corps, said in his official report: During the engagements of the 13th, the ambulances being guided and governed with p
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
out of chaos, health from disease, and surcease from suffering, in a manner and to a degree previously unparalleled. Its achievements must challenge the admiration of medical men for all time. Ambulance train of the engineer corps at Falmouth, Virginia 1863 Ambulance train of the engineer corps at Falmouth, Virginia 1863 upon which litters were laid or suspended, jarring being taken up by springs or rubber. These trains often included special cars arranged and used as kitchens, storFalmouth, Virginia 1863 upon which litters were laid or suspended, jarring being taken up by springs or rubber. These trains often included special cars arranged and used as kitchens, storerooms, dispensaries, and surgeries. From the completeness of their resources, the better type of them was practically a hospital on wheels. Frequently the sick and wounded were easiest and best removed by water, particularly in the vicinity of the Atlantic coast and in sections of the Mississippi watershed. But all transport vessels were under control of the Quartermaster's Department, which ordinarily gave the greatest preference and importance to its own duties, until higher authority, r
Coopers (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
nd the system pervading the whole Medical Department, from the stations in the field selected by the assistant surgeons with the regiments to the wards where the wounded were transferred from the hands of the surgeons to be attended by the nurses, afforded the most pleasing contrast to what we had hitherto seen during the war. . . . In the operations at the time of the battle of Chancellorsville in the following May, the Sixth Corps charged and took Marye's Heights behind the town of Fredericksburg. The medical director of the corps, in his report, says: The charge was made at 1 P. M.; the heights were taken, and in less than half an hour we had over eight hundred wounded. Two hours after the engagement, such was the celerity and system with which the ambulances worked, the whole number of wounded were within the hospitals under the care of nurses. In the battle of Gettysburg the ambulance organization was intact, and such was the perfection of its administration, that, on the
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
With the ambulance corps: transportation of Federal sick and wounded Edward L. Munson, M. D., Major, Medical Department, United States Army Well-equipped ambulance bearers of the army of the Potomac, 1862—drill in removing wounded Removing the wounded from Marye's heights, May 2, 1864: ambulance corps of the fifty-seventh New York infantry This spirited scene of mercy followed close on the assault and capture of the famous Stone Wall at Fredericksburg, May 2, 1863. The ambulances belong to the Fifty-seventh New York, which suffered a terrible loss when it helped, as a part of Sedgwick's Corps, to carry Marye's Heights. Out of one hundred and ninety-two men engaged, eight were killed, seventy-eight were wounded, and one was reported missing, a loss of forty-five per cent. Then the ambulance train was rushed to the front. Within half an hour all the wounded were in the field hospitals. The corps still had many of the short, sharply tilting, jolting two-wheeled ambu
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
nder the exclusive control of the medical officers. These varied in type from the finest freight boats to the best types of speedy steamers. United States hospital boat red rover at Vicksburg Hospital wharf on the Appomattox river, near City Point complete, to be used for succoring and transporting sick and wounded men, and for nothing else. The advantages of this organization became speedily manifest, and at the battle of Antietam, in the following month, it gave admirable service. fitted with bunks; others with stanchions and supports, Ambulances. An ambulance train parked at Harewood hospital, the month Gettysburg was fought Ambulances and medical supply wagons parked—1864 A train of ambulances at City Point Ambulance train. This photograph shows to what a state of perfection, in drill and equipment, the ambulance service of the Union armies had been brought by April, 1863. The castle on the ambulance curtains indicates the Engineer Co
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
were at first under control of the quartermaster's department, but later a number were placed under the exclusive control of the medical officers. These varied in type from the finest freight boats to the best types of speedy steamers. United States hospital boat red rover at Vicksburg Hospital wharf on the Appomattox river, near City Point complete, to be used for succoring and transporting sick and wounded men, and for nothing else. The advantages of this organization became spein giving the rank of colonel to department surgeons having more than 4,000 hospital beds under their charge, and of lieutenantcolonel to those having less than that number. The murderous two-wheeled and merciful four-wheeled ambulance United States ambulance repair shop at Washington the front or rear. If the ambulance train could not reach the places where the wounded were lying, it was halted at the nearest practicable point, and the ambulance corps went forward and removed the woun
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
of infantry drawn up in battle array in the background are ready to repel any further assaults while the wounded are being removed on the litters. The one in the foreground (on the left) exhibits a device to elevate the patient's limbs. The medical officer is gazing anxiously at the wounded soldier, and an orderly is hurrying over with some bandaging. Directly behind the orderly, bearers are lifting another sufferer on a litter into the four-wheeled ambulance. A few of the wounded at Gettysburg: second corps hospital, Union center, near Meade's headquarters To these rough tents, erected by the Second Federal Army Corps, the wounded have been rushed during the second and third days of the mightiest of all American battles, just decided at a cost of 6,664 dead and 27,206 wounded. Accommodations are simple. But cups hang at the front of the foremost tent wherewith to slake the sufferers' thirst, and at least one woman nurse is present to soothe their fevered brows with the touch
Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
urg, May 2, 1863. The ambulances belong to the Fifty-seventh New York, which suffered a terrible loss when it helped, as a part of Sedgwick's Corps, to carry Marye's Heights. Out of one hundred and ninety-two men engaged, eight were killed, seventy-eight were wounded, and one was reported missing, a loss of forty-five per cent. Ts, was quickly collapsible when not required, and possessed legs which made its temporary use as a cot readily possible. This photograph shows the wounded on Marye's Heights after the battle at Spotsylvania, May 12, 1864. The wounded man on the stretcher is gazing rather grimly at the camera. His hand is bound up, and his foot shitherto seen during the war. . . . In the operations at the time of the battle of Chancellorsville in the following May, the Sixth Corps charged and took Marye's Heights behind the town of Fredericksburg. The medical director of the corps, in his report, says: The charge was made at 1 P. M.; the heights were taken, and in les
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.14
of the improved ambulance now used in our army. The lower photograph shows a section of a the vast system of repairs. The tremendous importance of general hospitals was recognized by Congress in February, 1865, in giving the rank of colonel to department surgeons having more than 4,000 hospital beds under their charge, and of lieutenantcolonel to those having less than that number. The murderous two-wheeled and merciful four-wheeled ambulance United States ambulance repair shop at Washington the front or rear. If the ambulance train could not reach the places where the wounded were lying, it was halted at the nearest practicable point, and the ambulance corps went forward and removed the wounded to the ambulances by means of litters. The ambulance train then removed the wounded to the field-hospitals, the service of which is later discussed and of which there was one to each division, where more elaborate professional treatment was received. These field-hospitals were us
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