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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
thief. Wash 'em? said this man one day, when the Federal corporal had the impudence to refer to the sacred soil on his clothes— wash 'em, corp'ral? I'm bound to say 'at you're a damn fool! That mud's what holds 'em together; sticks 'em fast-like! Ef you was to put them do's in water they'd go to nothing just like a piece oa salt! Inside of these clay-clothes a stalwart frame of a man lived and worked, a fearless soul, which had met death and laughed at it, from the Seven Days to Gettysburg, but which was now engaged in superintending a small manufactory of bone trinkets and gutta-percha rings, the sale of which brought wherewithal to eke out the meager sustenance of the prison ration. The determination to escape held first place with thousands. Where the prison was a stockade such men were always engaged on a tunnel, or else devoted their minds to working out some fantastic plan which would not fail to give them their liberty. Some plotted rebellion against authority,
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
belongings which had escaped the Southerners under guard by the prison–bolts and walls of Fort Warren Perhaps the Confederate prisoner with the shawl in this photograph feels the Northern atmor in the North. Books and reading matter were evidently available to these Confederates in Fort Warren, 1864. The men in this photograph are C. T. Jenkins, seated on the left; W. W. Helm, standinaw reigned supreme in those days so far as regarded men with Southern sentiments, but once in Fort Warren the prisoners were treated with the utmost respect, well-fed, and placed in comfortable quartthey were quietly taken from the trains, put in charge of a provost-guard, and transported to Fort Warren or some similar Federal prison. Comfortable Confederates in fort Warren—1864 Written bfort Warren—1864 Written by a Confederate captive, and decorated in color gazing into vacancy. Nostalgia (homesickness) occasionally appears on the surgeons' reports as the cause of death of a prisoner, but there can be no<
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
with a system at Monte Carlo, such visionaries were always devising fantastic plans which could not fail to give them their liberty. The passion for gambling was even stronger in prison. Even at Andersonville captives staked their food, their clothing, their blankets, their most precious belongings. To many, some such excitement was a necessary stimulant, without which they might have died of monotony and despair. draped in a blanket washing his only pair of trousers was not uncommon at Macon. At some of the prisons proper facilities were provided, but, oftener, men reverted to the habits of the cave-man. Says Sidney Lanier, in the book already quoted: For this man's clothes, those three thieves, grease, dirt, and smoke, had drawn lots; but not content with the allotment, all three were evidently contending which should have the whole suit. It appeared likely that dirt would be the happy thief. Wash 'em? said this man one day, when the Federal corporal had the impud
Millen (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
the majority of such attempts to escape. The great difficulty in all prisons was the necessity of getting through the twenty-four hours without yielding to fatal despair. in money allowed them as compensation. Thus, additional barracks were constructed in some Northern prisons largely by prison labor, and the ditch through which fresh water was led into the stagnant pond at Elmira, was dug by the prisoners. The Confederacy attempted to establish shoe and harness shops at Andersonville, Millen, and perhaps other places, to utilize the skill of the mechanics in prison and the hides of the slaughtered cattle which were going to waste. Assignments to the burial squad at all these Southern prisons were eagerly sought, and men also were glad to be detailed to the wood-squad, which brought in fuel, thinking themselves well repaid by the opportunity of getting outside the stockades for a few hours daily. Then, too, there was always a chance of escape if the guard were careless. Life
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
The life of the captured Holland Thompson Confederates in a Northern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master Alldridge. The others were: (2) Lieutenant Moses, C. S. A., (9) Captain Underwood, C. S. A., (10) Major Boland, C. S. A., (11) Second Assistant E. H. Browne, (14) Master Mate John Billups of the privateer Tacony, and (15) Captain Sanders, C. S. A. To go into a prison of war is in all respects to be born over. And so in this far little world, which was as much separated from the outer world as if it had been in the outer confines of space, it was striking to see how society immediately re
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
uted elsewhere. Sidney Lanier in Tiger Lilies. Sidney Lanier, the Southern poet, in the novel Tiger Lilies, from which the quotation at the head of the chapter was taken, has elaborated some of his reflections during his own prison life at City Point, in the American Civil War. The individuals comprising the three estates, however, were not wholly the same in prison and out. Life in prison brought out unexpected capabilities and unsuspected deficiencies. Men who in the ordinary routine of on this photograph by a Confederate prisoner's hand speaks eloquently for itself. This was the only Federal prison without any barracks. Only tents stood upon the low, narrow sand-spit. Prisoners were sent here from the West for exchange at City Point; at times as many as twenty thousand were crowded within the limits of the stockade. But from the faded photograph on this page there is reflected the spirit of the Confederate army—devotion to duty. As the ex-soldiers stood in line, a task a
Johnson's Island (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
s are evidently at ease. Not every man is a Mark Tapley who can keep cheerful under creditable circumstances. But where the prisoners were men of some mentality they adopted many plans to mitigate the monotony. The Confederate officers at Johnson's Island had debating societies, classes in French, dancing, and music, and a miniature government. From left to right the men standing, exclusive of the two corporals on guard, are C. W. Ringgold, F. U. Benneau, S. DeForrest, J. T. Hespin, J. P. Haattributed to other diseases. Where the prisoners were educated men with resources in themselves, they struggled bravely to keep up their courage, for if this were lost their chances of survival were lessened. The Confederate officers at Johnson's Island had debating societies, classes in French, dancing, and music; they organized a government and debated and raised questions in their House of Representatives. The same sort of thing went on at Libby and at other places, and some of the disc
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
ome of the prisoners toward their companions are revolting. In Andersonville and Salisbury, organized bands preyed upon the weak or upon thol and execution of a number of prisoners by their companions in Andersonville is well known. In those prisons where the prisoners cooked t money, and bought the belongings of the spendthrifts. Even in Andersonville, prisoners kept restaurants and wood-yards, and hundreds peddlesiness men in the prisons, as well as the improvident. Even in Andersonville, there were prisoners who kept restaurants and wood-yards. Hunhe Confederacy attempted to establish shoe and harness shops at Andersonville, Millen, and perhaps other places, to utilize the skill of the The passion for gambling was even stronger in prison. Even at Andersonville captives staked their food, their clothing, their blankets, the even some of the poorly clothed prisoners on Belle Isle and in Andersonville and Florence gambled away the clothing and blankets sent by the
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
The life of the captured Holland Thompson Confederates in a Northern keep. Port Warren. 1864 Nine of the prisoners in this photograph were officers of the Confederate States ironclad Atlanta, captured at Savannah, June 17, 1863: (1) Master T. L. Wragg, (3) Gunner T. B. Travers, (4) First Assistant Engineer Morrill, (5) Second Assistant Engineer L. G. King, (6) Master Mate J. B. Beville, (7) Pilot Hernandez, (8) Midshipman Peters, (12) Third Assistant Engineer J. S. West, (13) Master As page is represented David Kilpatrick (third from left), who became mayor pro tem. of New Orleans, and G. W. Dupre (tenth), later clerk of the Louisiana Supreme Court. Others well known later as citizens of their home communities and of the United States, can be picked out from the complete roster from left to right as it was written on the photograph: J. F. Stone, First Maryland Cavalry; H. C. Florance, First W. Artillery; D. Kilpatrick, First W. Artillery; William Byrne, Cit. Maryland; D. W
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.5
elves, they struggled bravely to keep up their courage, for if this were lost their chances of survival were lessened. The Confederate officers at Johnson's Island had debating societies, classes in French, dancing, and music; they organized a government and debated and raised questions in their House of Representatives. The same sort of thing went on at Libby and at other places, and some of the discussions given in the books of reminiscences are exceedingly interesting. At Camp Ford, in Texas, at Fort Lafayette, and at one of the Richmond prisons, newspapers written out by hand were published. A study of mortality statistics shows that there were fewer deaths in the prisons for officers than in those for privates. Their treatment was not essentially different and their food was often the same, yet they endured the hardships more successfully. Generally, they were, of course, men of more education and training than the privates, and had greater resources in themselves. They
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