hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert E. Lee 150 10 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 123 11 Browse Search
United States (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 98 0 Browse Search
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) 91 1 Browse Search
Charlottesville Early 90 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 73 1 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
James E. B. Stuart 71 11 Browse Search
R. H. Anderson 70 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 95 total hits in 21 results.

1 2 3
evening before. The invading party could learn at Falmouth all they wanted to know, and I have not a doubt that when they crossed the river they were under the impression that only one company of cavalry occupied the town. I do not suppose any one in Falmouth had heard of the arrival of Bell and his company — the latter, I believe, having been quartered below town or in its suburbs late the evening previous. You know more accurately than I do as to the fruits of the victory, &c. The Munchausen story of prisoners, holding the town three hours, &c., is simply ludicrous. The Federal cavalryman was killed by one of the Confederates, and not a citizen. The first was on the outside of a fence on a cross street and the other on the inside. There was no dash on his part after a Rebel flag, but those living in the vicinity said he was retreating and refused to surrender. This I learned a very brief period after he was killed, and whilst his body was still lying on the ground. His
certain points on the Potomac, and on the upper Rappahannock at the various fords twenty-five or thirty miles above Fredericksburg, leaving at headquarters, besides the sick and such as had no arms, but few efficient men. The evening before Dahlgren's raid Captain Simpson's company, from Norfolk, unexpectedly joined us, but having provided no quarters, they were distributed for the night in the most convenient houses. Next morning Dahlgren entered the town, conducted by a deserter from Stafford, who led his men over a ford near Falmouth which had not been used within the memory of man. Our pickets nearer town were deceived and captured. Our position in town and our weakness were well known to the surrounding country, and of course to the deserter. When the attack was made by Dahlgren on our camp, he found but a few sick and disabled men, with the usual employees of the quartermaster and commissary, and perhaps a few others. Captain Simpson placed himself at the head of a few of
Ulric Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 2.15
Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. This incident is scarcely of sufficient importance to demy a sensational press. In the Memoir of Ulric Dahlgren, by his father, Rear Admiral Dahlgren, theRear Admiral Dahlgren, there is quoted from the account of a newspaper correspondent the following vivid sketch of the affairdred men all told. The tide ebbed, and Captain Dahlgren left his hiding place with his fifty-seve The Rebel cavalry were in every street. Captain Dahlgren resolved to fall upon them like a thunderd. Having cleared the main thoroughfare, Captain Dahlgren swept through a cross street upon anotherpetuous charge drove them back again, and Captain Dahlgren gathered the fruits of the victory--thirt but few efficient men. The evening before Dahlgren's raid Captain Simpson's company, from Norfol as many men in Fredericksburg at the time as Dahlgren, and of these several were sick and others wi you propose of the article sent in regard to Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. The files of [4 more...]
John Critcher (search for this): chapter 2.15
ar equals it. It will go down to history as one of the bravest achievements on record. The following letters from Judge Critcher and Major Kelly show how largely the correspondent drew upon his imagination in his account of this comparatively insis a fair sample of the style in which many of the so-called histories of the day are manufactured. The letters of Judge Critcher and Major Kelly were written after seeing the above account of one of the bravest achievements on record. General Fiaper a minute and accurate account of every incident of the day was published the next morning. Most respectfully, John Critcher, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding at Fredericksburg in the autumn of 1862. Fredericksburg, April 19, 1872. Judge CritJudge Critcher: Dear Sir — I regret very much that I am unable to assist you materially in the review you propose of the article sent in regard to Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. The files of the Herald during the war fell a prey to the ravages of
J. Raiford Bell (search for this): chapter 2.15
I looked for some moments before I realized that they were indeed Federal soldiers. I saw the blue overcoats, but thought they belonged to Colonel Bell's company, he having arrived, as I understood, the evening before. The invading party could learn at Falmouth all they wanted to know, and I have not a doubt that when they crossed the river they were under the impression that only one company of cavalry occupied the town. I do not suppose any one in Falmouth had heard of the arrival of Bell and his company — the latter, I believe, having been quartered below town or in its suburbs late the evening previous. You know more accurately than I do as to the fruits of the victory, &c. The Munchausen story of prisoners, holding the town three hours, &c., is simply ludicrous. The Federal cavalryman was killed by one of the Confederates, and not a citizen. The first was on the outside of a fence on a cross street and the other on the inside. There was no dash on his part after a R
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 2.15
ide into Fredericksburg. The contributors to the daily newspapers seem to be under the necessity of writing something, if possible, that is marvellous and sensational; and a father may well be pardoned for reproducing what is so flattering to his pride. But the facts: There were four companies of cavalry, just mustered into service and armed with such guns as each man could provide, that had then their headquarters at Fredericksburg. But these companies were distributed by order of General Smith (then at Richmond) from West Point, on the York river, along the lower Rappahannock; at certain points on the Potomac, and on the upper Rappahannock at the various fords twenty-five or thirty miles above Fredericksburg, leaving at headquarters, besides the sick and such as had no arms, but few efficient men. The evening before Dahlgren's raid Captain Simpson's company, from Norfolk, unexpectedly joined us, but having provided no quarters, they were distributed for the night in the mos
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 2.15
y as one of the bravest achievements on record. The following letters from Judge Critcher and Major Kelly show how largely the correspondent drew upon his imagination in his account of this comparatively insignificant affair. But this romancing is a fair sample of the style in which many of the so-called histories of the day are manufactured. The letters of Judge Critcher and Major Kelly were written after seeing the above account of one of the bravest achievements on record. General Fitzhugh Lee: My Dear Sir — There is far more of romance than truth in the newspaper account of Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. The contributors to the daily newspapers seem to be under the necessity of writing something, if possible, that is marvellous and sensational; and a father may well be pardoned for reproducing what is so flattering to his pride. But the facts: There were four companies of cavalry, just mustered into service and armed with such guns as each man could provide,
ensational press. In the Memoir of Ulric Dahlgren, by his father, Rear Admiral Dahlgren, there is quoted from the account of a newspaper correspondent the following vivid sketch of the affair: I am sitting in Colonel Ashboth's tent, at General Sigel's headquarters, listening to a plain statement of what occurred, narrated by a modest, unassuming sergeant. I will give it briefly. General Burnside had requested that a cavalry reconnoissance of Fredericksburg should be made. General SiGeneral Sigel selected his body-guard, commanded by Captain Dahlgren, with fifty-seven of the First Indiana cavalry. It was no light task to ride forty miles, keep the movement concealed from the enemy, cross the river and dash through the town, especially as it was known that the Rebels occupied it in force. It was an enterprise calculated to dampen the ardor of most men, but which was hailed almost as a holiday excursion by the Indianians. They left Gainesville Saturday morning, took a circuitous ro
ion of how history is manufactured and a small affair magnified into a brilliant achievement by a sensational press. In the Memoir of Ulric Dahlgren, by his father, Rear Admiral Dahlgren, there is quoted from the account of a newspaper correspondent the following vivid sketch of the affair: I am sitting in Colonel Ashboth's tent, at General Sigel's headquarters, listening to a plain statement of what occurred, narrated by a modest, unassuming sergeant. I will give it briefly. General Burnside had requested that a cavalry reconnoissance of Fredericksburg should be made. General Sigel selected his body-guard, commanded by Captain Dahlgren, with fifty-seven of the First Indiana cavalry. It was no light task to ride forty miles, keep the movement concealed from the enemy, cross the river and dash through the town, especially as it was known that the Rebels occupied it in force. It was an enterprise calculated to dampen the ardor of most men, but which was hailed almost as a h
at Falmouth, the exploit of this youthful hero, though very creditable to him, seems not so distinguished by its boldness or success. I append a letter from Major Kelly, from whom I hoped to obtain an accurate account of — the affair. He was then editor of the Fredericksburg Herald, in which paper a minute and accurate account of every incident of the day was published the next morning. Most respectfully, John Critcher, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding at Fredericksburg in the autumn of 1862. Fredericksburg, April 19, 1872. Judge Critcher: Dear Sir — I regret very much that I am unable to assist you materially in the review you propose of the article sent in regard to Dahlgren's ride into Fredericksburg. The files of the Herald during the war fell a prey to the ravages of the times, and I have not the slightest recollection of any facts that I may then have written. The first intimation I had of the affair was a small colored boy's coming into the chamber (about 8 o'
1 2 3