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Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
andria, Iron Duke, Duillio, &c. During the war with the Confederacy, there were 123 torpedoes planted in Charleston harbor and Stono river, which prevented the capture of that city and its conflagration. There were 101 torpedoes planted in Roanoke river, North Carolina, by which, of twelve vessels sent with troops and means to capture Fort Branch, but five returned. One was sunk by the fire from the fort, and the rest by torpedoes. Of the five iron-clads sent with other vessels to take Mobile, Alabama (one was tin-clad), three were destroyed by torpedoes. There were fifty-eight vessels sunk by torpedoes in the war, and some of them of no small celebrity, as Admiral Farragut's flag-ship the Harvest Moon, the Thorn, the Commodore Jones, the Monitor Patapsco, Ram Osage, Monitor Milwaukee, Housatonic and others. (Cairo in Yazoo river). Peace societies we must acknowledge a failure in settling national differences by arbitration, since enlightened nations go to war for a mere politi
Canandaigua (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
uccess of the torpedo exercises, believing that they will command the attention of all the navies in the world. Enthusiasts claim that naval warfare has been substantially revolutionized by its invention; and the exercises of the squadron during the closing days of February, prove that this newfangled concern is not to be despised, as the navy often learned to its sorrow during the protracted blockade of the Southern coast at the time of the recent war. The Wabash, Congress, Ticonderoga, Canandaigua, Ossipee, Colorado, Brooklyn, Wachusett, Kansas, Lancaster, Alaska, Franklin, Fortune and Shenandoah, participated in the practice. This recalls to mind the following narration, well known to some of our readers: During the war with the Seminole Indians in Florida, April, 1840, the Seventh United States infantry was stationed at posts in the interior of the peninsula, and the country had been divided into squares of twenty miles each, and the headquarters located at Fort King, the former
Fort Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
ce upon the success of the torpedo exercises, believing that they will command the attention of all the navies in the world. Enthusiasts claim that naval warfare has been substantially revolutionized by its invention; and the exercises of the squadron during the closing days of February, prove that this newfangled concern is not to be despised, as the navy often learned to its sorrow during the protracted blockade of the Southern coast at the time of the recent war. The Wabash, Congress, Ticonderoga, Canandaigua, Ossipee, Colorado, Brooklyn, Wachusett, Kansas, Lancaster, Alaska, Franklin, Fortune and Shenandoah, participated in the practice. This recalls to mind the following narration, well known to some of our readers: During the war with the Seminole Indians in Florida, April, 1840, the Seventh United States infantry was stationed at posts in the interior of the peninsula, and the country had been divided into squares of twenty miles each, and the headquarters located at Fort Kin
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
tion of least resistance. While other nations are pursuing the science of assault and defence theoretically and experimentally, the United States has had more practical experience with the torpedo, and better understands its capabilities, wisely discarding the iron and steel leviathians of the deep for models, as the Dreadnaught, Inflexible, Devastation, Alexandria, Iron Duke, Duillio, &c. During the war with the Confederacy, there were 123 torpedoes planted in Charleston harbor and Stono river, which prevented the capture of that city and its conflagration. There were 101 torpedoes planted in Roanoke river, North Carolina, by which, of twelve vessels sent with troops and means to capture Fort Branch, but five returned. One was sunk by the fire from the fort, and the rest by torpedoes. Of the five iron-clads sent with other vessels to take Mobile, Alabama (one was tin-clad), three were destroyed by torpedoes. There were fifty-eight vessels sunk by torpedoes in the war, and s
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
gh it, as the direction of least resistance. While other nations are pursuing the science of assault and defence theoretically and experimentally, the United States has had more practical experience with the torpedo, and better understands its capabilities, wisely discarding the iron and steel leviathians of the deep for models, as the Dreadnaught, Inflexible, Devastation, Alexandria, Iron Duke, Duillio, &c. During the war with the Confederacy, there were 123 torpedoes planted in Charleston harbor and Stono river, which prevented the capture of that city and its conflagration. There were 101 torpedoes planted in Roanoke river, North Carolina, by which, of twelve vessels sent with troops and means to capture Fort Branch, but five returned. One was sunk by the fire from the fort, and the rest by torpedoes. Of the five iron-clads sent with other vessels to take Mobile, Alabama (one was tin-clad), three were destroyed by torpedoes. There were fifty-eight vessels sunk by torpedoe
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
ron Duke, Duillio, &c. During the war with the Confederacy, there were 123 torpedoes planted in Charleston harbor and Stono river, which prevented the capture of that city and its conflagration. There were 101 torpedoes planted in Roanoke river, North Carolina, by which, of twelve vessels sent with troops and means to capture Fort Branch, but five returned. One was sunk by the fire from the fort, and the rest by torpedoes. Of the five iron-clads sent with other vessels to take Mobile, Alabama (one was tin-clad), three were destroyed by torpedoes. There were fifty-eight vessels sunk by torpedoes in the war, and some of them of no small celebrity, as Admiral Farragut's flag-ship the Harvest Moon, the Thorn, the Commodore Jones, the Monitor Patapsco, Ram Osage, Monitor Milwaukee, Housatonic and others. (Cairo in Yazoo river). Peace societies we must acknowledge a failure in settling national differences by arbitration, since enlightened nations go to war for a mere political abst
Seven Pines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
or more troops were collected there, and it became such an object of dread to the whole army that a soldier guard was put over it until Captain Rains was able to go and take it in. Suppose, said one officer to another, high in rank, that the Captain had died of his wound, what would you have done? I thought, said he, of firing at it with a six-pounder at a safe distance, and thus knocking it to pieces. The occasion of the first submarine torpedo was as follows: Soon after the battle of Seven Pines (called in Northern prints Fair Oaks ) General R. E. Lee, commanding, sent for General Rains and said to him: The enemy have upwards of one hundred vessels in the James river, and we think that they are about making an advance that way upon Richmond, and if there is a man in the whole Southern Confederacy that can stop them, you are the man. Will you undertake it? I will try, was the answer; and observing that ironclads were invulnerable to cannon of all calibre used and were really mast
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 5.39
-loading. The battering-ram and catapult gave way to the smooth-bore cannon, chain, bar and spherical shot, which is now yielding, except in enormous calibre 15-inch and more, to rifle-bores and elongated chilled shot (yet, on account of inertia, rifle calibre should never exceed ten inches). Torpedoes come next in the catalogue of destructives, the modern ne plus ultra of warlike inventions. The world indeed is in throes of fire and marine monsters. While war is looming up between Russia and Turkey, other nations are striving in guns, iron-clads and torpedo ships, for maritime supremacy. The powers of electricity in light-giving and heat-controlling to examine and blind an adversary by its glare at night, and fire-torpedoes for his destruction at all times, and the capability of steel and iron with Professor Barff's superheated steam in endurance, offensive and defensive, will be called into action to resist the 100-ton guns of Italy and other formidable calibres, also torp
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
ebruary, prove that this newfangled concern is not to be despised, as the navy often learned to its sorrow during the protracted blockade of the Southern coast at the time of the recent war. The Wabash, Congress, Ticonderoga, Canandaigua, Ossipee, Colorado, Brooklyn, Wachusett, Kansas, Lancaster, Alaska, Franklin, Fortune and Shenandoah, participated in the practice. This recalls to mind the following narration, well known to some of our readers: During the war with the Seminole Indians in Florida, April, 1840, the Seventh United States infantry was stationed at posts in the interior of the peninsula, and the country had been divided into squares of twenty miles each, and the headquarters located at Fort King, the former agency, which was commanded by Colonel Whistler, and Captain G. J. Rains commanded at Fort Micanopy, just twenty-five miles distant. Though there was, and had been since the beginning of hostilities, an Indian town within sound of drum at Fort King; yet it was so
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5.39
team in endurance, offensive and defensive, will be called into action to resist the 100-ton guns of Italy and other formidable calibres, also torpedo boats like the Thornycroft of France, the Lightning of England, and the Porter Alarm of the United States. Iron-clads are said to master the world, but torpedoes master the iron-clads, and must so continue on account of the almost total incompressibility of water and the developed gasses of the fired gunpowder of the torpedo under the vessel's bottom passing through it, as the direction of least resistance. While other nations are pursuing the science of assault and defence theoretically and experimentally, the United States has had more practical experience with the torpedo, and better understands its capabilities, wisely discarding the iron and steel leviathians of the deep for models, as the Dreadnaught, Inflexible, Devastation, Alexandria, Iron Duke, Duillio, &c. During the war with the Confederacy, there were 123 torpedoe
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