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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
of Guilford Court-house. Two horses were killed under him in this action, and he himself, dangerously wounded, was left upon the field, and was captured by the enemy. He was subsequently exchanged, and his sword was returned to him. This valued relic is now in the possession of his grandson, the Hon. Alexander H. H. Stuart, of Va. Judge Alexander Stuart, the youngest son of Major Alexander Stuart, was a lawyer by profession, and resided at various times in Virginia, in Illinois, and in Missouri. He held many honorable and responsible offices in each of these states. He died and was buried in Staunton, Va. His eldest son, the Hon. Archibald Stuart, of Patrick, the father of our general, was an officer in the war of 1812. He embraced the profession of law, and throughout his long and eventful life was actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and in political life. He represented first the county of Campbell, in the Virginia legislature, and was afterwards repeatedly e
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
pirit sustained him and ensured his recovery. Such boys grow into men who are an honor to any country. It has fallen to my lot on previous occasions, but in a different manner, to give the southern view of the cavalry battles at Fleetwood, at Aldie, Middleburg and Upperville, which occurred during the month of June, 1863, at the opening of the Gettysburg campaign. Some northern writers have persistently claimed notable victories in these engagements; but I have shown that the claim is witho of June, at Brandy station, was aught but a day of glory to the southern cavalry. No repeated assertions can convince the survivors of Fitz Lee's old brigade that the enemy could ever have moved James Breckinridge from behind that stone wall at Aldie; and no amount of florid rhetoric can persuade the men who fought under Stuart between Middleburg and Upperville, on that memorable Sabbath, the 21st of June, that there was anything of shame or defeat in retiring all day before the enemy's caval
Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
tained him and ensured his recovery. Such boys grow into men who are an honor to any country. It has fallen to my lot on previous occasions, but in a different manner, to give the southern view of the cavalry battles at Fleetwood, at Aldie, Middleburg and Upperville, which occurred during the month of June, 1863, at the opening of the Gettysburg campaign. Some northern writers have persistently claimed notable victories in these engagements; but I have shown that the claim is without foundat assertions can convince the survivors of Fitz Lee's old brigade that the enemy could ever have moved James Breckinridge from behind that stone wall at Aldie; and no amount of florid rhetoric can persuade the men who fought under Stuart between Middleburg and Upperville, on that memorable Sabbath, the 21st of June, that there was anything of shame or defeat in retiring all day before the enemy's cavalry, supported by a corps of infantry, and yet giving up hardly five miles of ground. I must not
Fort Lyon (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
Col. Lee to come and see him. I told them he would never accede to any terms but those he had offered; and as soon as I could tear myself away from their importunities I left, waved my cap, and Col. Lee's plan was carried out. * * * When Smith first came to the door I recognized old Osawatomie Brown, who had given us so much trouble in Kansas. No one then present but myself could have performed this service. In the Summer of 1860 the First cavalry was engaged in building Fort Wise, now Fort Lyon, and from this point Lieutenant Stuart, who had been notified of his promotion to a captaincy, but had not yet received his commission, made his way to Virginia in the Spring of 1861, and offered his sword for the defence of his native state. His resignation as an officer in the United States Army was accepted on the 7th of May. His first commission in the Confederate service was that of lieutenant colonel of infantry, dated 10th May, 1861, with orders to report to Col. T. J. Jackson,
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
n the upper side of the Chickahominy. The results of this expedition were most important and satisfactory. Within a few days Stuart with his cavalry conducted Jackson's corps over the same route to McClellan's rear, and on the 27th the crushing defeat of the Federal right wing was consummated at Cold Harbor. Aside from these s fairy tale than sober truth; and the astonishment of our troops at the boldness of such a leader was only equalled by the enthusiasm which his success inspired. Jackson's victories in the Valley had at this same time created the wildest ardor, and now the hopes of all were centred in the immortal three--Lee, Jackson, Stuart, undeiscences of those days. Chancellorsville. It was a weird scene which the dim moonlight disclosed when Stuart was recalled from Ely's ford to take command of Jackson's corps. The news of the fall of their great chieftain had spread among the men, and a sense of awe and dread seemed to pervade the lines, made still more impres
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
ng opened a document marked confidential, the order was committed to my charge for the night, and Stuart was soon asleep. The letter discussed at length the plan proposed of passing around the enemy's rear. It informed General Stuart that General Early would move upon York, Pennsylvania, and that he was desired to place his cavalry as speedily as possible with that, the advance division of Lee's right wing. The letter suggested that as the roads leading northward from Shepherdstown and Williamsport were already incumbered by the infantry, the artillery, and the transportation of the army, the delay which would necessarily occur in passing by these, would, perhaps, be greater than would ensue if General Stuart passed around the enemy's rear. The letter further informed him that if he chose the latter route General Early would receive instructions to look out for him, and endeavor to communicate with him; and York, Pennsylvania, was designated as the point in the vicinity of which
Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
. I cannot now follow Stuart as he led our cavalry through the seven days battles around Richmond; at Cedar mountain; at the second battle of Manassas; through the first Maryland campaign, and at Fredericksburg. I cannot do more than make bare mention of his midnight descent upon the rear of Pope's army at Catlett's station — or of his expedition into Pennsylvania, when he again electrified both nations by passing for the second time around McClellan's army as it lay on the banks of the Potomac — returning to the Virginia shore without the loss of a man or a horse, having accomplished one of the most wonderful marches on record. Nor is it my intention to enter into the details of the Chancellorsville campaign. The distinguished officer who, one year ago, spoke to you from this place, has given with eloquence and power, which I cannot hope to equal, the history of the cavalry in that battle. He has told you how paucity of numbers was compensated for by the skill of the commander
Kearney, Neb. (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
of ten days Stuart was able to ride upon horseback; and as the other wounded were in condition to bear removal, this detachment started in the endeavor to reach Fort Kearny, which was supposed to be less than one hundred miles distant. Within five days the party was deserted by their Pawnee guides, and was left, during a rainy seasut compass, without sun or stars to guide their course. Lost in the wilderness! In this dilemma Stuart volunteered to press forward with a small party to find Fort Kearny, and send out thence for the relief of the main body. For two days he wandered without gaining any knowledge of the fort or of his own location; but on the thithward which he recognized as the mail route from Kearny to Leavenworth. Pursuing this trail for fifty-five miles, on the evening of the same day he arrived at Fort Kearny, whence succor and supplies were sent to his suffering comrades. Lost in the wilderness, with no means of determining the course in which he was marching;--tra
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
ibiting the same powers of endurance, the same indomitable resolution, the same devotion to duty, the same quiet reliance upon the guiding hand of an overruling Providence which fitted him in after days for the high command which devolved upon him. Faithful in little, he was faithful also in much. From the Fall of 1857 until thth Early during the afternoon or the night of the same day. This would have brought him to Gettysburg in time to participate in the battle of the first day. But Providence directed otherwise; and still believing that our army was upon the Susquehanna, Stuart pressed forward to Carlisle, and two days, precious days, were lost in a xcept at the sacramental table. Devotion to duty — duty to his God, duty to his country, was the ruling principle of his life. His reliance upon an overruling Providence was simple and complete. When about to graduate at West Point, he discusses, in letters to his father, the future which lies before him; and while much incline
Campbell (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.70
and resided at various times in Virginia, in Illinois, and in Missouri. He held many honorable and responsible offices in each of these states. He died and was buried in Staunton, Va. His eldest son, the Hon. Archibald Stuart, of Patrick, the father of our general, was an officer in the war of 1812. He embraced the profession of law, and throughout his long and eventful life was actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and in political life. He represented first the county of Campbell, in the Virginia legislature, and was afterwards repeatedly elected from Patrick county to the same body. He was a member of the famous Convention of 1829-30, and of the Convention of 1850, in which he was actively associated with the Hon. Henry A. Wise. He represented the Patrick District in the Federal Congress during the Nullification period, and was a strong supporter of Mr. Calhoun in that crisis. Concerning his personal character I quote the words of another: Archibald Stuart w
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