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Gainesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
rint at all so far as we know:] headquarters Kemper's brigade, September, 1862. Brigadier-General J. L. Kemper, Commanding Division: General,--I submit the following report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, which I had the honor to command during the battles of Groveton (August 29) and Manassas No 2 (August. 30th, 1862). On the morning of the 29th this brigade marched with the others of your command from its bivouac near Thoroughfare Gap, and halted about three miles east of Gainesville about 12 o'clock. We were at once placed in line of battle, in rear of Jenkins' brigade, near the Manassas Gap railroad. After remaining in this position for a short time, the brigade moved forward, east of the railroad. The Twenty-fourth Virginia was here detached and sent to support Rogers' battery, stationed near the------house. The rest of the brigade, by your order, was then moved west of the railroad, forming line of battle a few yards from the outskirts of a wood. The Seventh V
Groveton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8.85
d Manassas. Report of Colonel M. D. Corse, Commanding Kemper's Brigade. [The following important report does not appear in the Army of Northern Virginia reports, printed by the Confederate congress, and has never been in print at all so far as we know:] headquarters Kemper's brigade, September, 1862. Brigadier-General J. L. Kemper, Commanding Division: General,--I submit the following report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, which I had the honor to command during the battles of Groveton (August 29) and Manassas No 2 (August. 30th, 1862). On the morning of the 29th this brigade marched with the others of your command from its bivouac near Thoroughfare Gap, and halted about three miles east of Gainesville about 12 o'clock. We were at once placed in line of battle, in rear of Jenkins' brigade, near the Manassas Gap railroad. After remaining in this position for a short time, the brigade moved forward, east of the railroad. The Twenty-fourth Virginia was here detached a
d near the------house. The rest of the brigade, by your order, was then moved west of the railroad, forming line of battle a few yards from the outskirts of a wood. The Seventh Virginia went forward in skirmishing order across a field, some three hundred yards to the front. In the last movement the brigade was subjected to a heavy shelling from a battery of the enemy, distant about twelve hundred yards. Remaining in this position for half an hour, I received through your A. A. General, Captain Fry, an order to move forward, and to the right; to withdraw the Seventh, connect it with my line, and occupy a wood in front, distant four hundred yards. In obeying this order, the brigade was forced to move in full view of the above mentioned battery, which kept a constant fire upon us. Nothing daunted, however, the line moved steadily forward and took the position designated. I threw out Captain Simpson's company (Seventeenth regiment) as skirmishers to the front and right. In a short ti
John M. Patton (search for this): chapter 8.85
destructive volley into the enemy's ranks on our left, and pushed forward to the charge. The valiant Patton led the heroic Seventh Virginia. Its list of casualties in officers and men gives proof they were where the battle raged fiercely. Colonel Patton, Lieutenant-Colonel Florence, Major Swindler, and Adjutant Patton all fell, severely wounded in this brilliant onset. The ever-ready First, as usual, did its work manfully. Major Clements, with the war-worn Eleventh, moved forward with veteAdjutant Patton all fell, severely wounded in this brilliant onset. The ever-ready First, as usual, did its work manfully. Major Clements, with the war-worn Eleventh, moved forward with veteran firmness. The Seventeenth, led by the ardent Lieutenant-Colonel Marye, advanced in perfect line. Just before reaching the battery Colonel Marye fell, wounded severely (leg since amputated), and, under the command of the intrepid Major Herbert, the regiment continued the charge. The charge was a success, the enemy was driven from his guns, his infantry supports scattered, and his battery taken. My line was now somewhat broken, owing to the impetuosity of the charge, and seeing the en
tant Patton all fell, severely wounded in this brilliant onset. The ever-ready First, as usual, did its work manfully. Major Clements, with the war-worn Eleventh, moved forward with veteran firmness. The Seventeenth, led by the ardent Lieutenant-Colonel Marye, advanced in perfect line. Just before reaching the battery Colonel Marye fell, wounded severely (leg since amputated), and, under the command of the intrepid Major Herbert, the regiment continued the charge. The charge was a successColonel Marye fell, wounded severely (leg since amputated), and, under the command of the intrepid Major Herbert, the regiment continued the charge. The charge was a success, the enemy was driven from his guns, his infantry supports scattered, and his battery taken. My line was now somewhat broken, owing to the impetuosity of the charge, and seeing the enemy advancing his reserves, I dispatched my assistant adjutant-general, Captain Bryant, and aid de camp, Captain Beckham, to you for aid, which was promptly furnished. Samuel Coleman, private, company E, Seventeenth Virginia, in the hottest of the fight, wrested from the hands of the color-sergeant of the Elev
M. D. Corse (search for this): chapter 8.85
Second Manassas. Report of Colonel M. D. Corse, Commanding Kemper's Brigade. [The following important report does not appear in the Army of Northern Virginia reports, printed by the Confederate congress, and has never been in print at all so far as we know:] headquarters Kemper's brigade, September, 1862. Brigadier-General J. L. Kemper, Commanding Division: General,--I submit the following report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, which I had the honor to command during the battlesgiven below. command.officers.men.aggregate loss. Killed.Wounded.Total.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Total. First Virginia Regiment24622212531 Seventeenth Virginia Regiment 55439 4348 Eleventh Virginia Regiment123853 6164 Seventh Virginia Regiment 1212536 4153 Twenty-fourth Virginia Regiment1451063 7378 Total42731292131243274 Summary. Killed33 Wounded240 Missing1    274 I remain, General, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, M. D. Corse, Colonel Commanding Br
Samuel Coleman (search for this): chapter 8.85
eg since amputated), and, under the command of the intrepid Major Herbert, the regiment continued the charge. The charge was a success, the enemy was driven from his guns, his infantry supports scattered, and his battery taken. My line was now somewhat broken, owing to the impetuosity of the charge, and seeing the enemy advancing his reserves, I dispatched my assistant adjutant-general, Captain Bryant, and aid de camp, Captain Beckham, to you for aid, which was promptly furnished. Samuel Coleman, private, company E, Seventeenth Virginia, in the hottest of the fight, wrested from the hands of the color-sergeant of the Eleventh Pennsylvania regiment, his regimental colors and handed them to me. These colors I have already had the honor to forward to you. At this juncture, having received a wound in the thigh, and finding that my horse was tottering under me from a wound through his body, I turned over the command to Colonel Terry, reported to you, and with your permission, retired
time Major Palmer rode up, and I made him acquainted with the fact. I informed him of our situation, and suggested that some troops should be placed on our right. He went off, and in a short time General Drayton (with his brigade) reported with orders to relieve me. I then moved east of the railroad, and connected with the Twenty-fourth in line in rear of the house, keeping in front a line of pickets until the morning of the thirtieth, connecting with General Drayton on the right, and Colonel Benning, commanding Toombs' brigade, on the left. At 3 o'clock Colonel Hunton (Eighth Virginia), commanding Pickett's brigade, brought the order that this brigade, with the others of your command, were to occupy (at 5 o'clock P. M.) a wood near the Chinn House, in front of the line then occupied by Jenkins and Hunton. General Jenkins, Colonel Hunton and myself then rode forward and viewed the ground. It was agreed that they should advance and occupy the position, while I would support them
Eppa Hunton (search for this): chapter 8.85
on the right, and Colonel Benning, commanding Toombs' brigade, on the left. At 3 o'clock Colonel Hunton (Eighth Virginia), commanding Pickett's brigade, brought the order that this brigade, with t 5 o'clock P. M.) a wood near the Chinn House, in front of the line then occupied by Jenkins and Hunton. General Jenkins, Colonel Hunton and myself then rode forward and viewed the ground. It was agColonel Hunton and myself then rode forward and viewed the ground. It was agreed that they should advance and occupy the position, while I would support them. At half-past 4 o'clock your aid, Captain Flood, brought me an order to move forward in haste to the support of Jenkins and Hunton. I promptly obeyed, and over-took the two brigades advancing. I at once put my command in line about two hundred and fifty yards in rear of the two advancing brigades, keeping my distand artillery, I pushed forward, changing front so as to cover the ground just before occupied by Hunton's (Pickett's) brigade. In passing the Chinn House it was necessary to face the Twenty-fourth re
W. D. Pickett (search for this): chapter 8.85
ouse, keeping in front a line of pickets until the morning of the thirtieth, connecting with General Drayton on the right, and Colonel Benning, commanding Toombs' brigade, on the left. At 3 o'clock Colonel Hunton (Eighth Virginia), commanding Pickett's brigade, brought the order that this brigade, with the others of your command, were to occupy (at 5 o'clock P. M.) a wood near the Chinn House, in front of the line then occupied by Jenkins and Hunton. General Jenkins, Colonel Hunton and myseof the two advancing brigades, keeping my distance as they moved forward. Near the Chinn House, while under fire of the enemy's infantry and artillery, I pushed forward, changing front so as to cover the ground just before occupied by Hunton's (Pickett's) brigade. In passing the Chinn House it was necessary to face the Twenty-fourth regiment (Colonel Terry) to the left and file to the right. After passing this obstacle it came into line beautifully, and the whole line then became hotly engag
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