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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ance in the St. Johns, within five miles of Jacksonville, and on the next day announced the arrival at Jacksonville of eighteen vessels-gunboats and transports — the landing of the enemy, presumed in reek, twelve or thirteen miles distant from Jacksonville, where I found our troops in position. Theo Cedar creek, within six or seven miles of Jacksonville. On the 3rd Major-General J. Patton Andersm reliable sources, that the enemy occupied Jacksonville with at least twelve thousand men, that the supplied with means for a regular seige of Jacksonville, our operations in that quarter must be conlected on the St. John's, a few miles above Jacksonville, for a battery of one rifled thirty-two pou obstructed from passing with troops beyond Jacksonville. Cavalry pickets have been also establising of the 7th February the enemy landed at Jacksonville, from eighteen transports and gunboats, a l On the 8th instant the enemy advanced from Jacksonville with great rapidity, in three heavy columns[3 more...]
Camp Beauregard (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ts. On the 8th instant the enemy advanced from Jacksonville with great rapidity, in three heavy columns-cavalry in the advance. Artillery and infantry followed under command of Brigadier-General Seymour. They approached Camp Finnegan as the command there were in the act of retiring. Their largely superior numbers deterred Lieutenant-Colonel McCormick, commanding, from attacking them, and in the darkness of the night he withdrew his command with caution and address and joined me at Camp Beauregard, near Ocean Pond, on the Olustee, on the 13th instant. The enemy, with celerity, pressed on to Baldwin, capturing on their way five guns of Company A and B, Light Artillery, which had been ordered to Baldwin; reached Baldwin at daylight on the 9th instant. Remaining a short time, they continued on to Barber's the same night. At this point they were met, on the 10th instant, by two companies of cavalry, under Major Robert Harrison, Second Florida cavalry, whom I had ordered to join me
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
efore in print. They will be read with interest, and will be received as a valuable contribution to the material for the future historian: Report of General Beauregard.Headquarters Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, S. C., March 25th, 1864. General,--In transmitting detailed reports of recent operations in East Florida, I have to accompany them, for the information of the War Department, with the following: The officer in observation at Foot Point, of t-and Inspector-General C. S. A., Richmond, Virginia. Report of General Joseph Finnegan.Headquarters District East Florida, in the field, twelve miles from Jacksonville, February 26, 1864. Brigadier-General Thos. Jordan, Chief of Staff, Charleston, S. C.: General,--For the information of the commanding general I have the honor to report that on the evening of the 7th February the enemy landed at Jacksonville, from eighteen transports and gunboats, a large force of cavalry, artillery and
Whitemarsh Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
informed the Honorable Secretary of War by telegraph the 9th ultimo, I regarded it as imperative to attempt to secure the subsistence resources of Florida. General Finnegan was also apprised of these reinforcements on the 11th February, and instructed to mancoeuvre meantime to check or delay the enemy, but to avoid close quarters and unnecessary loss of men. While these reinforcements were en route, the enemy again attempted to delay them by a movement with show of force against Whitemarsh Island, near Savannah, and it became a measure of proper precaution to halt at Savannah two of the regiments on the way to General Finnegan, for the development of the enemy's plans, one of which regiments, indeed, I felt it but prudent to detain there to the present. The want of adequate rolling stock on the Georgia and Florida railroads, and the existence of the gap of some twenty-six miles between the two roads, subjected the concentration of my forces to a delay, which deprived my effort
Cedar Creek (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
him the immediate command of the troops in the State of South Carolina, but he promised to repair to any point threatened or attacked by the enemy, and give the officer there in command the benefit of his experience and assistance. On the 2nd instant I reached Camp Milton, General Gardner's Headquarters, in rear of McGirt's creek, twelve or thirteen miles distant from Jacksonville, where I found our troops in position. The day preceding, our advanced pickets had been thrown forward to Cedar creek, within six or seven miles of Jacksonville. On the 3rd Major-General J. Patton Anderson also arrived at Camp Milton, and assumed command on the 6th instant of the forces, now about eight thousand effectives of all arms. In the meantime it had been ascertained, from reliable sources, that the enemy occupied Jacksonville with at least twelve thousand men, that the position, naturally strong, had been much strenghtened since the battle of the 20th ultimo, and that four or five gunboats i
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
f small arms) than usual, I gave Major-General Gilmer, at Savannah, immediate notification of the fact, with instructions toeported. On the 16th of January, I repaired in person to Savannah, in which quarter I apprehended some operations might be re. Colquitt's brigade was ordered from James' island to Savannah with a light battery; General Finnegan was advised of wharacticable, with infantry to be drawn from Charleston and Savannah, but requested, in consequence of the very recent dischart to take their places and avoid danger to Charleston and Savannah. Scarcely had Colquitt's brigade began to move when the o the theatre of war from the works around Charleston and Savannah, and the positions covering the Savannah railroad. This vement with show of force against Whitemarsh Island, near Savannah, and it became a measure of proper precaution to halt at Savannah two of the regiments on the way to General Finnegan, for the development of the enemy's plans, one of which regimen
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
Johns's island. Though assured of the purpose of this movement, it assumed, however, so serious a form as to compel me to divert, temporarily, General Colquitt's and three and a half regiments of his brigade, to reinforce General Wise, then confronted by at least two brigades of the enemy (about four thousand five hundred strong), pushed forward in advance of the Haulover or bridgeway between Johns's and Seabrook's island,s and in addition several regiments of infantry were detached from Sullivan's and James's islands to be in readiness for the development of the enemy's purposes. On the night of the 11th ultimo I ordered all our batteries bearing on Morris island to open a heavy simultaneous fire on that portion, as if a cover for an assault, and with the hope of forcing the enemy to withdraw from Johns's island to the protection of his own works. This stratagem seems to have produced the desired effect, or assisted to make him abandon the movement on Johns's island, and withdra
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
uarters Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, S. C., March 25th, 1864. General,--In transmitting detailed reports of recent operations in East Florida, I have to accompany them, for the information of the War Department, with the following: The officer in observation at Foot Point, of the enemy's fleet in the waters of Port Royal and Broad river, having reported, on the afternoon of the 14th January, that some thirty-five vessels, including an iron-clad from Hilton Head, had gone to sea in the fog the day before, and probably with troops, as it was observed to be more quiet on the adjacent islands (less drumming and firing of small arms) than usual, I gave Major-General Gilmer, at Savannah, immediate notification of the fact, with instructions to keep strict watch in the direction of Warsaw Sound and the Ossabaw. At the same time orders were given to the proper staff-officers to hold means of transportation by rail in readiness on the Charleston and Sav
Lake City (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
defeat the enemy at Ocean-Pond, some thirteen miles in advance of Lake City. In the meanwhile other troops, fast as the means of railroad ration of the enemy into the interior, either on the line towards Lake City, or into the lower part of the State, to which end a position hased Sanderson; on the 11th instant they were within three miles of Lake City. Here I had hastily collected, principally from the District of aced this force in a favorable position two and a half miles from Lake City, in the direction of the enemy. At half past 9 the enemy advanceworks, and concentrated their whole force for a final movement on Lake City. In the meantime I used every possible effort to gather reinfo on the 13th moved to Ocean Pond, on Olustee, thirteen miles from Lake City, and occupied the only strong position between Lake City and BarbLake City and Barber's. Here I had field works thrown up, and for several days with a force less than two thousand strong, awaited the enemy's advance. In t
Foot Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.2
ere never before in print. They will be read with interest, and will be received as a valuable contribution to the material for the future historian: Report of General Beauregard.Headquarters Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, S. C., March 25th, 1864. General,--In transmitting detailed reports of recent operations in East Florida, I have to accompany them, for the information of the War Department, with the following: The officer in observation at Foot Point, of the enemy's fleet in the waters of Port Royal and Broad river, having reported, on the afternoon of the 14th January, that some thirty-five vessels, including an iron-clad from Hilton Head, had gone to sea in the fog the day before, and probably with troops, as it was observed to be more quiet on the adjacent islands (less drumming and firing of small arms) than usual, I gave Major-General Gilmer, at Savannah, immediate notification of the fact, with instructions to keep strict watch i
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