hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 278 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 264 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 185 1 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 180 0 Browse Search
W. M. Polk 178 2 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 174 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ruggles 165 1 Browse Search
B. F. Cheatham 143 5 Browse Search
N. H. Harris 143 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 132 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 39 total hits in 23 results.

1 2 3
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
rything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name. Major Irving A. Buck, of Baltimore, the name signed to the paper, and not Major Brock, the name which the printers put at the head of it, was the author of the interesting sketch of Cleburne and his division at Missionary Ridge and Ringgold Gap, which we published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present on the occasion. We are glad to learn that their monument scheme has been so entirely successful that they expect to dedicate it on the 10th of May next, and have secured General Fitz. Lee as the orator of the day. We hope to be able to greet our comrades of the Pelican State on that occasion
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present on the occasion. We are glad to learn that their monument scheme has been so entirely successful that they expect to dedicate it on the 10th of May next, and have secured General Fitz. Lee as the orator of the day. We hope to be able to greet our comrades of the Pelican State on that occasion, and to participate in the interesting exercises. The Carolina rifle battalion, of Charleston, S. C., celebrated appropriately the birthday of General R. E. Lee, on the 19th instant, and the Maryland Confederate army and Navy Society had their reunion on the same day. Would it not be well for this anniversary to be more generally celebrated?
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present on the occasion. We are glad to learn that their monument scheme has been so entirely successful that they expect to dedicate it on the 10th of May next, and have secured General Fitz. Lee as the orator of the day. We hope to be able to greet our comrades of the Pelican State on that occasion, and to participate in the interesting exercises. The Carolina rifle battalion, of Charleston, S. C., celebrated appropriately the birthday of General R. E. Lee, on the 19th instant, and the Maryland Confederate army and Navy Society had their reunion on the same day. Would it not be well for this anniversary to be more generally celebrated?
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
Seventh Virginia infantry, was one of the most brilliant young officers in the Army of Northern Virginia, and we share the regret of our gallant friend, General M. D. Corse, that in printing his report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, at Second Manassas (page 538, volume viii), in our last number, we should have allowed the name to be corrupted into Florrence. Colonel Ed. A. Palfrey, of New Orleans, informs us that he was not the author of the article on The secret history of Gettysburg, with which we credited him in our last, but that it was written by Captain W. J. Seymour, who served on General Hays's staff — the only connection Colonel Palfrey having with it being to furnish copies of the letters of Generals Lee and Cooper. We regret that we were led into this mistake by the friend who sent us the paper. We are always careful to have a responsible name attached to everything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present on the occasion. We are glad to learn that their monument scheme has been so entirely successful that they expect to dedicate it on the 10th of May next, and have secured General Fitz. Lee as the orator of the day. We hope to be able to greet our comrades of the Pelican State on that occasion, and to participate in the interesting exercises. The Carolina rifle battalion, of Charleston, S. C., celebrated appropriately the birthday of General R. E. Lee, on the 19th instant, and the Maryland Confederate army and Navy Society had their reunion on the same day. Would it not be well for this anniversary to be more generally celebrated?
Baltimore City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
him in our last, but that it was written by Captain W. J. Seymour, who served on General Hays's staff — the only connection Colonel Palfrey having with it being to furnish copies of the letters of Generals Lee and Cooper. We regret that we were led into this mistake by the friend who sent us the paper. We are always careful to have a responsible name attached to everything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name. Major Irving A. Buck, of Baltimore, the name signed to the paper, and not Major Brock, the name which the printers put at the head of it, was the author of the interesting sketch of Cleburne and his division at Missionary Ridge and Ringgold Gap, which we published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ters of Generals Lee and Cooper. We regret that we were led into this mistake by the friend who sent us the paper. We are always careful to have a responsible name attached to everything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name. Major Irving A. Buck, of Baltimore, the name signed to the paper, and not Major Brock, the name which the printers put at the head of it, was the author of the interesting sketch of Cleburne and his division at Missionary Ridge and Ringgold Gap, which we published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present on the occasion. We are glad to learn that their monument scheme has been so entirely successful that they expe
Edward A. Palfrey (search for this): chapter 1.7
gallant friend, General M. D. Corse, that in printing his report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, at Second Manassas (page 538, volume viii), in our last number, we should have allowed the name to be corrupted into Florrence. Colonel Ed. A. Palfrey, of New Orleans, informs us that he was not the author of the article on The secret history of Gettysburg, with which we credited him in our last, but that it was written by Captain W. J. Seymour, who served on General Hays's staff — the only connection Colonel Palfrey having with it being to furnish copies of the letters of Generals Lee and Cooper. We regret that we were led into this mistake by the friend who sent us the paper. We are always careful to have a responsible name attached to everything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name. Major Irving A. Buck, of Baltimore, the name signed to the paper, and not Major Brock, the name which the printers put at the head of it,
W. J. Seymour (search for this): chapter 1.7
of Northern Virginia, and we share the regret of our gallant friend, General M. D. Corse, that in printing his report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, at Second Manassas (page 538, volume viii), in our last number, we should have allowed the name to be corrupted into Florrence. Colonel Ed. A. Palfrey, of New Orleans, informs us that he was not the author of the article on The secret history of Gettysburg, with which we credited him in our last, but that it was written by Captain W. J. Seymour, who served on General Hays's staff — the only connection Colonel Palfrey having with it being to furnish copies of the letters of Generals Lee and Cooper. We regret that we were led into this mistake by the friend who sent us the paper. We are always careful to have a responsible name attached to everything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name. Major Irving A. Buck, of Baltimore, the name signed to the paper, and not Major Broc
C. C. Flowerree (search for this): chapter 1.7
ease ask your neighbor if he has received his January number, and if he has not tell him about this paragraph. The delay in getting out our last number has necessarily caused delay in this number; but we hope before long to get back to our former custom of issuing the number for each month not later than the 20th of the month before. Volume VIII has been bound. We have a few copies on hand, which we can supply at once, and we should be glad to have prompt orders. Colonel C. C. Flowerree, of the Seventh Virginia infantry, was one of the most brilliant young officers in the Army of Northern Virginia, and we share the regret of our gallant friend, General M. D. Corse, that in printing his report of the operations of Kemper's brigade, at Second Manassas (page 538, volume viii), in our last number, we should have allowed the name to be corrupted into Florrence. Colonel Ed. A. Palfrey, of New Orleans, informs us that he was not the author of the article on The sec
1 2 3