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Cub Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
t of a brigade and their short rifles had cloven it in two. Where the Yankee line had stood lay the dead and dying, but the brigade of General Wilcox was scattered to the winds. Captain Edelin captured a flag from the First Michigan, but they made no further stand that day. Colonel Elzey pursued them rapidly, flanking the Henry House, when General Beauregard rode up to him saying, Hail, Elzey! Thou Blucher of the day. Thence the brigade followed them beyond the Stone bridge, half way to Cub Run. Here it halted, and about sundown was ordered back to Camp Walker, near Union Mills Ford, reaching there at midnight. Thus these green soldiers, fresh from home, had in three days marched nearly eighty miles on one day's rations, with only six hours sleep, fought a battle and won a victory. President Davis, next morning, sent Colonel Elzey his promotion as Brigadier. He said going into battle to an officer (Major Johnson), Now for a yellow sash or six feet of ground. He had gallantly
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
g, which being made known through the Richmond Enquirer, large and liberal contributions were at once sent on from Virginia and the South. Over $20,000 worth of supplies of clothes and money was thus collected in a few weeks. Richmond was foremost in the work. Virginia, ever liberal, exceeded herself, and the whole South lavished generosity. Wherever there was a group of Maryland people they took pride in supplying their kindred in the field. Colonel George Schley and Dr. Steiner, of Augusta, Ga., sent Colonel Johnson $1,100 from themselves and other Marylanders. A gentleman of New Orleans, born in Prince George's, sent General Johnson $1,000. Hundreds of the sons of the old land, scattered through the Confederacy, sent their contributions until at last it was necessary to decline any further additions to the treasury. The clothing and blankets thus collected supplied the regiment to some extent during the remainder of the time it was in service. In December it was decided to
Hall's Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
hting their way with obstinacy but unable to hold their ground at any point. The pursuit was continued until within a mile and three-quarters of Arlington Mills. By this expedition two important posts were gained for our lines. While this was going on, Company A, Captain Goldsborough, and Company B, Captain Edelin, were having a brisk skirmish near Mason's house, where they killed and captured several of the enemy. Afterwards on this line the regiment had several skirmishes. One when Hall's hill was captured; Companies B and H, Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson, were engaged, and one at Padgett's, on the Little River pike, where Companies A and H, Captain Goldsborough, drove the enemy into their works at Alexandria. We became attached to this life. The constant excitement of skirmishing was such an agreeable variety to the monotony of camp, that we were loth to give it up, and frequently asked and obtained permission to double our tours of picket duty there. The fall of 1861 thus p
Baltimore City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
using a State flag presented at home to Captain Johnson's company. Captain Snowden, the regimental commissary, brought up a little blue Maryland color sent from Baltimore for the regiment, It was fastened to the lance by the side of the other one. Just then Kirby Smith galloped up. The watch-word is Sumter, the signal is this, sarom surrounding camps invited to attend. A convention was held according to custom, and a ticket duly and regularly nominated. General Benjamin C. Howard, of Baltimore, headed it for Governor, and an electoral ticket pledged to the support of Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stephens was added. Judges of election were appointed, and formed, and though only mustered on the 21st of May had been in active service since the 8th and 9th of May, 1861. Company A had served under Colonel Johnson in Baltimore during the week succeeding the 19th of April. Most of the men of these companies re-enlisted and went off on furlough. Captain Goldsborough, with his old men a
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
e halted, and Colonel Steuart read an order from General Johnston, informing them of the attack that day by the enemy at Bull Run, and calling on them to step out and march, so as to be in time for the great battle about to come off. Moving all nightervice. In December it was decided to put the troops in winter quarters and the division moved back along the line of Bull Run by Union Mills. The Fourth brigade was quartered near the ground it bivouaced on the night after the memorable march Union Mills. The Fourth brigade was quartered near the ground it bivouaced on the night after the memorable march and fight of July 21st. Pitching the camp on the hill just above Union Mills, towards McLean's Ford, every one set to work cleaning a place to build huts in. Hard work for a month, with few tools and nails, delaying all the time in hope of getting Union Mills, towards McLean's Ford, every one set to work cleaning a place to build huts in. Hard work for a month, with few tools and nails, delaying all the time in hope of getting plank to roof with, at last gave a neat, regular village of log houses, with streets and ditches, well ventilated and well drained. This was christened Camp Maryland, and the different streets and houses bore the names of loved and cherished locali
Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
m of the attack that day by the enemy at Bull Run, and calling on them to step out and march, so as to be in time for the great battle about to come off. Moving all night, they forded the Shenandoah about sunrise, and never halting once, reached Piedmont after midnight, in a drenching rain. There they halted Saturday, getting scant rations, and about 10 o'clock P. M., were marched to the railroad to get into the cars for Manassas junction. It was 3 o'clock A. M., however, before they got off, Maryland on the right, Tenth Virginia, then Third Tennessee. The Thirteenth Virginia had been sent another way. The terrible heat stifled the men, the dust choked their parched throats; all were on foot, the officers' horses having been left at Piedmont, but not a man fell out of ranks; now they came to wounded and bleeding men, but they only ran on the faster. They crossed a stream of mud, stirred by thousands of men and horses; catching handfuls, they thrust it in their mouths without stoppi
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
e green soldiers, fresh from home, had in three days marched nearly eighty miles on one day's rations, with only six hours sleep, fought a battle and won a victory. President Davis, next morning, sent Colonel Elzey his promotion as Brigadier. He said going into battle to an officer (Major Johnson), Now for a yellow sash or six feet of ground. He had gallantly won the former. The advance on Fairfax Courthouse. On Tuesday, July 23d, the First Maryland and Third Tennessee, with the Leesburgh battery, and some cavalry under command of Colonel J. E. B. Stuart, marched on to Fairfax Courthouse, starting at 3 o'clock A. M. As soon as it became light, the character of the rout was gradually revealed. The road was strewn with small arms and officers' swords, sashes, pistols, caissons, overturned ammunition wagons, loads of provisions, meat, bread, coffee, sugar, sutlers' stores, everything eatable, drinkable, or wearable. In Fairfax were found immense stores of tents, clothing, ov
Upton's Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
force, consisting of four companies, Thirteenth Virginia, Major Terrill, and the above detachment of the First Maryland, came upon the flank and rear of a strong picket of the enemy on Munson's Hill; Colonel Stuart, with Major Terrill, charged directly on it, while Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson made a dash in the rear to cut off their retreat. But the Yankees were too fleet, and only some half a dozen prisoners rewarded the effort. Thence the two detachments marched by different routes on Upton's Hill, where a considerable body of the enemy were visable. When going through a thicket near the house, Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson suddenly came upon a scout of five, who mistook him for a Federal, one was captured, and the rest escaped. On reaching the house, it was found to have been just left; but the party there only withdrew a short distance, and immediately attacked the position. Here Lieutenant Mitchell was badly wounded, and Private Fontaine was killed; both of Company I. Colonel St
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
olonel Steuart read an order from General Johnston, informing them of the attack that day by the enemy at Bull Run, and calling on them to step out and march, so as to be in time for the great battle about to come off. Moving all night, they forded the Shenandoah about sunrise, and never halting once, reached Piedmont after midnight, in a drenching rain. There they halted Saturday, getting scant rations, and about 10 o'clock P. M., were marched to the railroad to get into the cars for Manassas junction. It was 3 o'clock A. M., however, before they got off, and the cars being detained, they did not arrive at Manassas until towards noon. The division of General Kirby Smith, consisting of the Fourth brigade (Colonel Elzey) and the Fifth (General Smith), was not all up; only the Fourth had arrived. There was then no time for waiting. Colonel Elzey immediately ordered knapsacks to be piled and struck off in a swinging pace for Manassas. Before then the regiment had been using a Sta
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.103
company. Captain Snowden, the regimental commissary, brought up a little blue Maryland color sent from Baltimore for the regiment, It was fastened to the lance by thhrowing his right hand above his forehead, palm outwards and forward. Forward Maryland!! On they sprang at double-quick by the Junction, over the fields, across roauths without stopping. A field officer, without a hat, galloped by. Hurrah, Maryland, he shouted, and the regiment responded with a cheer and sprang forward with rde. Such. was the first military execution in the Army of the Potomac. The Maryland elections. On the first Wednesday of November, the election day at home, the regiment determined that inasmuch as Maryland would not have an opportunity to express her sentiments free from Yankee interference, a poll should be opened in camprself, and the whole South lavished generosity. Wherever there was a group of Maryland people they took pride in supplying their kindred in the field. Colonel Georg
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