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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.104
Gordon, in Petersburg, with my own and another brigade. General Gordon ordered us to Lieutenant Run, on the road leading to the Jerusalem Plank-road, not far from the ruins of the Ragland House, (I think that was the name,) and there await further orders. We were not taken into action; but, some time after the repulse, were ordered back to our winter quarters. Just as we reached our camp, the enemy threw forward a very strong force, and swept the entire Confederate picket line from Hatcher's Run to Lieutenant Run, and it was feared they would attack our weak line of battle. Our artillery opened, and the fighting continued throughout the day. About dark we succeeded in reestablishing the picket line in our front, excepting the hill in front of our left, from which the enemy could fire into our winter quarters. This hill was on the left of the road leading to the Jones House, and not far from it. We retake the Hill in front of our left. Next morning General Lee sent for me
Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.104
Thirty-seventh regiment, who was captured at Petersburg, informs me that when Grant made his last attack at that city our front was assailed by two Yankee corps, and that a third was leaving the works to join them just as he was taken into the enemy's line. Lieutenant Wiggins was confined a short time in the Old Capitol prison, where he spent his twenty-first birthday, and was laughed at by his comrades for being twenty-one and yet not being free. When he and others were being taken to Harrisburg he jumped from the car window just after the train had crossed a bridge, and as the night was very dark and rainy, he made his escape. He had on at the time a uniform made of an old shawl, but next morning he prevailed on a Radical near by to give him a working suit and a valise as a disguise. He afterwards worked until he made money enough to buy him a fashionable suit, in Baltimore, and pay his passage from that city to Richmond. His escape was exciting and full of adventure. When he
Baltimore City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.104
at by his comrades for being twenty-one and yet not being free. When he and others were being taken to Harrisburg he jumped from the car window just after the train had crossed a bridge, and as the night was very dark and rainy, he made his escape. He had on at the time a uniform made of an old shawl, but next morning he prevailed on a Radical near by to give him a working suit and a valise as a disguise. He afterwards worked until he made money enough to buy him a fashionable suit, in Baltimore, and pay his passage from that city to Richmond. His escape was exciting and full of adventure. When he reached Richmond Lieutenant Meade and I dressed him up in our soiled military clothes, and a lady friend escorted him to the Provost Marshal's office, in the Baptist Female Institute. He there surrendered as a straggler, was paroled and given transportation to his home in North Carolina. Lieutenant Wiggins was considered one of our bravest young officers. He specially distinguishe
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.104
rs came up to warm their feet. Their toes were all exposed, the uppers of their shoes being ripped from the soles. I soon found out that one of them was from East Florida and the other from Middle, and that both were disgusted with Virginia on account of the cold. When I informed them that I had once lived in West Florida, one West Florida, one of them said: Mister, ain't Florida a great place? There the trees stay green all the time, and we have oranges and lemons, and figs and bananas, and it is the greatest country for taters you ever did see. The following will speak for themselves: Headquarters Twenty-Eighth N. C. T., Feb. 5, 1864. Captain,--Complying with tFlorida a great place? There the trees stay green all the time, and we have oranges and lemons, and figs and bananas, and it is the greatest country for taters you ever did see. The following will speak for themselves: Headquarters Twenty-Eighth N. C. T., Feb. 5, 1864. Captain,--Complying with the request of the officers and men of the Twenty-eighth regiment, it gives me pleasure to report to General Lane that his gallant old regiment, knowing that the term of service for which it reorganized under his command would expire in September next, and believing that the cause in which it then enlisted so cheerfully is just and
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.104
Therefore, be it resolved by the officers and men of Company C, Tweneighth North Carolina Troops, That we, believing our cause to be a holy and just one, do hereby pwhich, we regret to say, seems to have seized the hearts of many bad men in North Carolina, will, if persisted in, prove ruinous to our cause, dangerous to our libert-enlistment of the Thirty-Seventh regiment. Thirty-Seventh regiment of North Carolina troops, February 10, 1864. Governor,--At a meeting of the Thirty-seventh regiment of North Carolina troops, held this day, the following committee having been appointed to propose resolutions for the consideration of the meeting--Captain through the regular official channels; to his Excellency Governor Vance of North Carolina, and to the newspapers for publication. The above resolutions were then endered as a straggler, was paroled and given transportation to his home in North Carolina. Lieutenant Wiggins was considered one of our bravest young officers. H
the Thirty-seventh regiment of North Carolina troops, held this day, the following committee having been appointed to propose resolutions for the consideration of the meeting--Captain W. T. Nicholson, Company E; Captain D. L. Hudson, Company G; Captain A. J. Critcher, Company B; Sergeant J. M. Black, Company A; Private Rufus Holdaway, Company A; Sergeant H. D. Hagaman, Company B; Private P. W. Turnmire, Company B; Sergeant J. W. Alexander, Company C; Private J. W. Barnett, Company C; Private K. M. Hasty, Company D; Private K. M. Dees, Company D; Sergeant Alfred Green, Company E; Private James C. Coffy, Company E; Sergeant R. M. Staley, Company F; Corporal J. C. Duncan, Company F; Corporal C. C. Pool, Company G; Private A. Campbell, Company G; Sergeant J. J. Ormand, Company H; Sergeant R. B. Tucker, Company H; Sergeant J. C. Flow, Company I; Private D. L. McCord, Company I; Private D. H. Douglas, Company K; Private S. V. Box, Company K. Captain W. T. Nicholson, chairman of the comm
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 11.104
yed or driven from it. Resolved, That the spirit of submission, which, we regret to say, seems to have seized the hearts of many bad men in North Carolina, will, if persisted in, prove ruinous to our cause, dangerous to our liberty, and disgraceful to the fair name of our State; we, therefore, express our entire disapprobation of the course of these traitors, and earnestly appeal to them to desist from their ruinous policy, and sustain our government and leaders. Resolved, That in President Davis and Governor Vance we recognize the able statesmen, virtuous rulers, and true patriots, and pledge ourselves to sustain them throughout these trying times. Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to our Brigadier-General; also to the Fayetteville Observer and Wilmington Journal, with a request that they be published. Headquarters Lane's brigade, February 6th, 1864. To the Officers and Soldiers Of the Eighteenth Regiment, N. C. T.: Comrades,--It were not possible t
h line. When General Gordon attacked Fort Steadman, General Wilcox was sick, and I commanded his division. I was ordered about dark to report to General Gordon, in Petersburg, with my own and another brigade. General Gordon ordered us to Lieutenant Run, on the road leading to the Jerusalem Plank-road, not far from the ruins of the Ragland House, (I think that was the name,) and there await further orders. We were not taken into action; but, some time after the repulse, were ordered back to our winter quarters. Just as we reached our camp, the enemy threw forward a very strong force, and swept the entire Confederate picket line from Hatcher's Run to Lieutenant Run, and it was feared they would attack our weak line of battle. Our artillery opened, and the fighting continued throughout the day. About dark we succeeded in reestablishing the picket line in our front, excepting the hill in front of our left, from which the enemy could fire into our winter quarters. This hill was o
, your obedient servant, W. H. A. Speer, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding. Captain E. J. Hale, Jr., A. A. G. Resolutions of Company C, Twenty-Eighth North Carolina troops. At a meeting held in Company C, Twenty-eighth North Carolina Troops, January 30th, 1864, Capt. T. J. Linebarger was called to the chair and Corporal G. A. Abernathy appointed secretary. The object of the meeting having been explained by the president, Lieutenant M. A. Throneburg and privates J. M. Grice and J. P. Little were appointed a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sentiments of the meeting. Lieutenant Throneburg, from the Committee on Resolutions, reported and read the following preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted: Whereas, the term of service for which we enlisted will expire in August next, and whereas the exigencies of the service demand of every soldier to remain at his post and to do battle for his country's rights; Therefore, be it resolved by the
G. A. Abernathy (search for this): chapter 11.104
J. Hale, Jr., A. A. G. Resolutions of Company C, Twenty-Eighth North Carolina troops. At a meeting held in Company C, Twenty-eighth North Carolina Troops, January 30th, 1864, Capt. T. J. Linebarger was called to the chair and Corporal G. A. Abernathy appointed secretary. The object of the meeting having been explained by the president, Lieutenant M. A. Throneburg and privates J. M. Grice and J. P. Little were appointed a committee to draft resolutions expressive of the sentiments e Secretary communicate a copy of these resolutions to Brigadier-General Lane; also a copy to Colonel Speer, with the request that they be published on parade this afternoon. On motion, the meeting adjourned. T. J. Linebarger, President. G. A. Abernathy, Secretary. camp of the Eighteenth regiment, N. C. T., February 6th, 1864. At a meeting of the Eighteenth North Carolina Troops, held this day, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted: Whereas, It has been brou
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